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Tag: Wisconsin

One of FBI’s Most Wanted Fugitives Is Captured After Being on the Run for 16 Years

Octaviano Juarez-Corro

By Steve Neavling

A man accused of opening fire at a crowded Milwaukee park and killing two people and injuring three others in May 2006 was captured in Mexico, the FBI announced Friday. 

Octaviano Juarez-Corro, who disappeared after the shooting, was placed on the FBI’s Ten Most Wanted Fugitives list in September. 

He was wanted on two counts of first-degree homicide, three counts of attempted intentional homicide, and one count of unlawful flight to avoid prosecution. 

Acting on a tip, the FBI, with the help of Mexican authorities, found Juarez-Corro on Thursday evening in Guadalajara. 

“Octaviano Juarez-Corro spent the last 16 years running from law enforcement, hiding in another country, and believing time and distance was on his side,” Michael Hensle, special agent in charge of the FBI’s Milwaukee Field Office, said in a statement. “The FBI has a long reach and extraordinary law enforcement partnerships across the globe. I commend the tireless efforts of all our partners from Milwaukee to Mexico in closely coordinating with the FBI in capturing this wanted fugitive and helping to bring this violent offender to justice, as well as closure to the victims and their families.” 

According to authorities, hundreds of people were gathered at South Shore Park on the banks of Lake Michigan when Juarez-Corro approached a friend of his estranged wife and struck up a conversation. He and his wife, who shared a daughter, were close to finalizing a divorce at the time. 

Juarez-Corro opened fire at the park, striking his wife with two gunshot wounds in the chest, authorities allege. She survived. 

Milwaukee Police Chief Jeffrey Norman thanked the FBI for capturing Juarez-Corro.  

“The Milwaukee Police Department appreciates all of the efforts by the FBI and assisting law enforcement agencies involved in the apprehension of Octaviano Juarez-Corro,” Norman said. “With his capture, we are one step closer to bringing justice and closure to the victims, the victims’ families and everyone that was impacted by this tragic incident.”

Michael E. Hensle Named Special Agent in Charge of FBI’s Milwaukee Field Office

Special FBI Agent in Charge Michael Hensle

By Steve Neavling

Michael E. Hensle has been named special agent in charge of the FBI’s Milwaukee Field Office. 

Hensle had been serving as the deputy assistant director of the Inspection Division at FBI headquarters in Washington, D.C. 

Hensle became an FBI special agent in 2003, when he was first assigned to the Albany Field Office in New York, investigating white-collar crime, public corruption, and civil rights. 

In 2006, Hensle moved to the Newark Field Office in New Jersey and continued to investigate public corruption. He also investigated organized crime, domestic terrorism, and weapons of mass destruction violations. 

In 2008, Mr. Hensle became supervisory special agent in the Weapons of Mass Destruction Directorate at FBI headquarters, where he worked in the Infrastructure Countermeasures Unit and Biological Countermeasures Unit. In 2011, he was promoted to chief of the Biological Countermeasures Unit and led the bioterrorism program and initiatives to prevent the acquisition, production, and use of biological agents as weapons of mass destruction (WMDs). 

In 2012, Hensle transferred to the Salt Lake City Field Office, where he initially led the domestic terrorism, WMD, and crisis management programs for Utah, Idaho, and Montana. In 2015, he became assistant special agent in charge of Salt Lake City’s counterterrorism, WMD, crisis management, and administrative programs and oversaw the eight resident agencies in Montana.  In 2017, Hensle led the field office’s counterintelligence, cyber, intelligence, and administrative programs. 

In 2018, Hensle became inspector in the Inspection Division at FBI headquarters. In 2020, he was appointed to chief inspector and provided oversight of eight inspectors and staff in the Office of Inspections. 

Later in 2020, Mr. Hensle became deputy assistant director in the Inspection Division, where he continued to lead the Office of Inspections and oversaw the FBI’s internal affairs portfolio. In addition, he coordinated audits and reviews of the bureau conducted by the Department of Justice’s Office of Inspector General and the Government Accountability Office.  

Accused Mass Shooter Added to FBI’s Ten Most Wanted Fugitives List

Octaviano Juarez-Corro

By Steve Neavling

A man accused of opening fire at a crowded Milwaukee park and killing two people and injuring three others in May 2006 has been placed on the FBI’s Ten Most Wanted Fugitives list. 

Octaviano Juarez-Corro, who is now 47, has been on the run ever since. 

He’s wanted on two counts of first-degree homicide, three counts of attempted intentional homicide, and one count of unlawful flight to avoid prosecution. 

The FBI believes he fled to Mexico. 

According to authorities, hundreds of people were gathered at South Shore Park on the banks of Lake Michigan when Juarez-Corro approached a friend of his estranged wife and struck up a conversation. He and his wife, who shared a daughter, were close to finalizing a divorce at the time. 

“They were reportedly going through a difficult time in sharing visitation with their daughter,” Special Agent Steve Whitecotton of the FBI’s Milwaukee Field Office said in a statement.

Juarez-Corro opened fire at the park, striking his wife with two gunshot wounds in the chest. She survived. 

“The fact that this individual would be so reckless in an area where families were gathered to celebrate—and in front of his 3-year-old daughter—is just utterly unacceptable,” Whitecotton said. “He needs to be held accountable and brought to justice.”

The FBI believes Juarez-Corro weighs between 180 and 200 pounds, is about 5-foot-6 and has brown eyes and dark hair, which may be graying. He usually wears a mustache and sometimes a beard. He is about five feet, six inches tall. 

Anyone with information on Juarez-Corro’s whereabouts is asked to call 1-800-CALL-FBI. You may also submit a tip online at tips.fbi.gov

Justice Department Opens Investigation into Police Shooting of Jacob Blake in Wisconsin

By Steve Neavling

ticklethewire.com

The Justice Department has opened a civil rights investigation into the police shooting of a Black man in Wisconsin on Sunday.

A Kenosha police officer shot Jacob Blake seven times in the back, leaving him partially paralyzed and sparking days of unrest.

The FBI will lead the investigation, with assistance from the U.S. Attorney’s Office and the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division, the DOJ said in a statement.

Blake, 29, was shot as he leaned into his car following an interaction with police at the scene. Police said they tried to use a Taser, but it was unsuccessful.

Police were called to the scene to investigate a reported domestic disturbance.

A knife was found in Blake’s car, but it’s unclear whether he was trying to reach for it when he was shot.

Mural Celebrating Convicted Cop Killer Is Removed from Campus in Wisconsin

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A mural celebrating a woman on the FBI’s most wanted list was quickly removed from the campus of Marquette University in Wisconsin following complaints.

The Journal Sentinel reports that the mural of Assata Shakur was displayed in March at the Marquette Gender and Sexuality Resource Center.

But university officials weren’t happy. Shakur was convicted of killing a New Jersey state trooper in 1973 before fleeing to Cuba.

One quote in the mural read: “No one is going to give you the education you need to overthrow them.”

Wisconsin May Hire 5 Justice Department staffers to Investigate Cop-Involved Shootings

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The national outcry over cop-involved shootings may mean more accountability in Wisconsin.

Gov. Scott Walker said he may change his mind and include in the budget enough money to hire five state Justice Department staffers to investigate the officer-involved deaths, the Milwaukee-Wisconsin Journal Sentinel reports.

“If DOJ feels as though additional funding is necessary to address these cases, we are willing to work with them and the state Legislature to ensure adequate funding,” Walker spokeswoman Laurel Patrick said in an email.

One of the most recent officer-involved shootings occurred March 6 in Madison, where Tony Robinson was fatally shot by a white cop, prompting large protests.

Other Stories of Interest


FBI Investigating College Student in Wisconsin for Allegedly Trying to Make Ricin

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A 21-year-old college student in Wisconsin is accused of trying to make ricin, prompting the FBI and police to block off a four-block area Friday after finding a white substance, the Associated Press reports.

Authorities became concerned after professors at University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh expressed concerns that the student was making the deadly toxin.

A professor told authorities that the student asked about extracting the toxin from castor beans. When told to ask a biology professor, the student allegedly said, “They are all interested in life and I am interested in, like, ending it,” according to the search warrant.

The substance was sent to the FBI’s lab for analysis.

Wisconsin’s DOJ Delayed Child Pornography Investigations for Months, Records Show

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The Wisconsin Department of Justice delayed investigations of child pornography tips for months, the Post Crescent reports.

Criticism of the DOJ’s Internet child pornography unit mounted in March, when Milwaukee Special Agent-in-Charge Willie Brantley was fired and Special Agent Anna King resigned. It was discovered that nearly four dozen cases languished for months.

DOJ officials said they are overwhelmed and were forced to prioritize cases.

“A deep dive on any of these cases will reflect that they … were handled appropriately or resulted in discipline,” said DOJ Division of Criminal Investigation Administrator Dave Matthews.

Officials at the office denied any systemic problems existed.