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Tag: Wisconsin

Accused Mass Shooter Added to FBI’s Ten Most Wanted Fugitives List

Octaviano Juarez-Corro

By Steve Neavling

A man accused of opening fire at a crowded Milwaukee park and killing two people and injuring three others in May 2006 has been placed on the FBI’s Ten Most Wanted Fugitives list. 

Octaviano Juarez-Corro, who is now 47, has been on the run ever since. 

He’s wanted on two counts of first-degree homicide, three counts of attempted intentional homicide, and one count of unlawful flight to avoid prosecution. 

The FBI believes he fled to Mexico. 

According to authorities, hundreds of people were gathered at South Shore Park on the banks of Lake Michigan when Juarez-Corro approached a friend of his estranged wife and struck up a conversation. He and his wife, who shared a daughter, were close to finalizing a divorce at the time. 

“They were reportedly going through a difficult time in sharing visitation with their daughter,” Special Agent Steve Whitecotton of the FBI’s Milwaukee Field Office said in a statement.

Juarez-Corro opened fire at the park, striking his wife with two gunshot wounds in the chest. She survived. 

“The fact that this individual would be so reckless in an area where families were gathered to celebrate—and in front of his 3-year-old daughter—is just utterly unacceptable,” Whitecotton said. “He needs to be held accountable and brought to justice.”

The FBI believes Juarez-Corro weighs between 180 and 200 pounds, is about 5-foot-6 and has brown eyes and dark hair, which may be graying. He usually wears a mustache and sometimes a beard. He is about five feet, six inches tall. 

Anyone with information on Juarez-Corro’s whereabouts is asked to call 1-800-CALL-FBI. You may also submit a tip online at tips.fbi.gov

Justice Department Opens Investigation into Police Shooting of Jacob Blake in Wisconsin

By Steve Neavling

ticklethewire.com

The Justice Department has opened a civil rights investigation into the police shooting of a Black man in Wisconsin on Sunday.

A Kenosha police officer shot Jacob Blake seven times in the back, leaving him partially paralyzed and sparking days of unrest.

The FBI will lead the investigation, with assistance from the U.S. Attorney’s Office and the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division, the DOJ said in a statement.

Blake, 29, was shot as he leaned into his car following an interaction with police at the scene. Police said they tried to use a Taser, but it was unsuccessful.

Police were called to the scene to investigate a reported domestic disturbance.

A knife was found in Blake’s car, but it’s unclear whether he was trying to reach for it when he was shot.

Mural Celebrating Convicted Cop Killer Is Removed from Campus in Wisconsin

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A mural celebrating a woman on the FBI’s most wanted list was quickly removed from the campus of Marquette University in Wisconsin following complaints.

The Journal Sentinel reports that the mural of Assata Shakur was displayed in March at the Marquette Gender and Sexuality Resource Center.

But university officials weren’t happy. Shakur was convicted of killing a New Jersey state trooper in 1973 before fleeing to Cuba.

One quote in the mural read: “No one is going to give you the education you need to overthrow them.”

Wisconsin May Hire 5 Justice Department staffers to Investigate Cop-Involved Shootings

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The national outcry over cop-involved shootings may mean more accountability in Wisconsin.

Gov. Scott Walker said he may change his mind and include in the budget enough money to hire five state Justice Department staffers to investigate the officer-involved deaths, the Milwaukee-Wisconsin Journal Sentinel reports.

“If DOJ feels as though additional funding is necessary to address these cases, we are willing to work with them and the state Legislature to ensure adequate funding,” Walker spokeswoman Laurel Patrick said in an email.

One of the most recent officer-involved shootings occurred March 6 in Madison, where Tony Robinson was fatally shot by a white cop, prompting large protests.

Other Stories of Interest


FBI Investigating College Student in Wisconsin for Allegedly Trying to Make Ricin

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A 21-year-old college student in Wisconsin is accused of trying to make ricin, prompting the FBI and police to block off a four-block area Friday after finding a white substance, the Associated Press reports.

Authorities became concerned after professors at University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh expressed concerns that the student was making the deadly toxin.

A professor told authorities that the student asked about extracting the toxin from castor beans. When told to ask a biology professor, the student allegedly said, “They are all interested in life and I am interested in, like, ending it,” according to the search warrant.

The substance was sent to the FBI’s lab for analysis.

Wisconsin’s DOJ Delayed Child Pornography Investigations for Months, Records Show

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The Wisconsin Department of Justice delayed investigations of child pornography tips for months, the Post Crescent reports.

Criticism of the DOJ’s Internet child pornography unit mounted in March, when Milwaukee Special Agent-in-Charge Willie Brantley was fired and Special Agent Anna King resigned. It was discovered that nearly four dozen cases languished for months.

DOJ officials said they are overwhelmed and were forced to prioritize cases.

“A deep dive on any of these cases will reflect that they … were handled appropriately or resulted in discipline,” said DOJ Division of Criminal Investigation Administrator Dave Matthews.

Officials at the office denied any systemic problems existed.

Wisconsin DOJ Let 43 Child Porn Cases Languish While Predators Were Free

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The Wisconsin Department of Justice let at least 43 tips about suspected child pornography languish for four months or longer, compromising the investigations and keeping children in harm’s way, an internal investigation determined.

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports that the number could be a lot higher, revealing a major lapse in judgment by top officials in the state.

The probe resulted in the terminations of Willie Brantley, the former special agent in charge of the Justice Department’s Milwaukee office, and Anna King, a special agent who worked for him. All the cases were shifted from Madison to Milwaukee between 2011 and 2013, the Journal Sentinel reported.

“While there are examples during the three-year period of other (special agents in charge) holding cases between 60 and 89 days, these are outliers and no other (supervisor) ever held a case longer than that,” according to the letter, written by Deputy Attorney General Kevin St. John.

In one case, a 26-year-old man “was left free to allegedly molest an 11-year-old boy he was baby-sitting.”

“We still have concern that other cases under your former supervision, which have now been reassigned, may identify additional victims whose suffering might have been averted had you exercised the most rudimentary supervisory principles,” the letter notifying Brantley of his termination says. “This discipline takes into account the ongoing risk to the public safety that was set in play by your actions.”

FBI’s Reaches 80-Year Anniversary of Botched Attempt to Arrest John Dillinger, His Gang in Wisconsin

John Dillinger/fbi photo

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

It was a 80-year-old lesson the FBI will never forget.

Tuesday was the 80-year anniversary of the bureau’s bungled attempt to arrest gangster John Dillinger and his gang at Little Bohemia Lodge in northern Wisconsin, the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports.

Agents acting on a tip tried to raid the lodge but were met with a gun battle that killed a Civilian Conservation Corps worker.

Another gangster, Baby Face Nelson, killed one agent and sounded another.

The gang escaped.

“The FBI learned a lot from its early years and during the tragic incident of Little Bohemia in northern Wisconsin,” Special Agent in Charge Robert J. Shields Jr. said Tuesday.

“The lessons we learned back then would shape how the bureau trained its agents, prepared tactically and even how we developed important partnerships with local law enforcement in the many years that followed.”

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