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Tag: west texas

CBP’s West Texas Twitter Account under Fire for Offensive Retweets

Photo: Shutterstock

By Steve Neavling

CBP deactivated its Twitter account for the West Texas region following retweets criticizing President Biden and the media. 

The content included retweets from Stephen Miller, the architect of former President Trump’s hard-line immigration policies. 

CBP Commissioner Chris Magnus said the content was removed, and the Office of Professional Responsibility is investigating. 

“Totally unacceptable and disappointing that any CBP Twitter account was used to R/T offensive, unauthorized content,” Magnus tweeted. “This must not happen again.”

The content was revealed by Aaron Reichlin-Melnick, policy director of the American Immigration Council, who tweeted screenshots of the offensive remarks.

In one of the retweets, Miller wrote, “Violent criminals lay waste to our communities undisturbed while the immense power of the state is arrayed against those whose only crime is dissent.”

“The law has been turned from a shield to protect the innocent into a sword to conquer them,” Miller wrote. 

On Sunday, Miller slammed CBP for deactivating the account. 

“Joe Biden’s soulless open border crusade is killing thousands of innocents,” Miller tweeted. “Death and destruction everywhere. But instead of going after the murderous cartels, they are going after agents for RTs of pro-border messages. The Biden Administration hates the law and law enforcement.”

Parker: Supreme Court Oral Arguments in March, With An Empty Seat On the Bench

Ross Parker was chief of the criminal division in the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Detroit for 8 years and worked as an AUSA for 28 in that office.

Ross Parker

Ross Parker

By Ross Parker
ticklethewire.com

When counsel approach the lectern in the Supreme Court for oral argument during the rest of the term, instead of facing the blistering questions of the Court’s most aggressive inquisitor, they will instead see an empty chair among the nine on the bench, draped with a black sash. One of the Court’s most active and entertaining interrogators has bedeviled his last lawyer. There will be less laughter in the courtroom.

Justice Antonin Scalia died on February 13, 2016, one month shy of his eightieth birthday. Befitting his colorful life, it was after a day of quail hunting in West Texas. Although the politicians are rumbling about his successor and the conspiracy theorists whispering about the circumstances of his death, it was in all likelihood a peaceful death after an active life of purpose, whether you agree with his brand of conservatism or not.

In criminal cases, he generally supported the government. Along with Justice Thomas, he was unapologetically pro-death penalty, whether the defendant was under-age, mentally retarded, or subject to a botched execution. After all, those were all legal in 1791 when the 8th Amendment was ratified. He also labored to overrule the Warren revolution of cases restricting the police, especially Miranda v. Arizona.

But he could vote for the defendant, too, especially in areas involving jury trial rights and the traditional authority of trial judges. His Booker opinion ended mandatory Sentencing Guidelines. And Apprendi v. Arizona stopped judge-decided facts leading to sentence enhancements. He also was protective against the reach of technology. In Kylio he authored the opinion requiring search warrants for thermal imaging searches. Marijuana grow lights became a bit more private.

Justice Antonin Scalia

Justice Antonin Scalia

Despite his sometimes angry and outrageous vitriol during argument and in his opinions, he was by all accounts well liked by his colleagues on the bench and the staff. He was one of a kind and his death diminishes the energy and vivacity of the institution.

Without Justice Scalia’s contributions, the Court will consider two criminal cases during its March oral arguments. Betterman v. Montana raises one of those issues that you would have thought had already been decided — whether the 6th Amendment guarantee of a speedy trial applies to the sentencing phase. Are defendants protected against inordinate delay in the final disposition of sentence by the 6th Amendment?

The defendant pled guilty to bail jumping after he failed to appear for sentencing on a domestic assault conviction. He explained that he did not have transportation from Butte to the courthouse in Billings. He eventually sobered up enough to turn himself in to the county jail, where he remained for 14 months when he was finally sentenced to 7 years consecutive to his 5 year sentence for assault, with no credit for time served. Don’t go in the wind in Montana after beating up your spouse.

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