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Tag: U.S. Marshals Service

Man Found Dead by Neighbor Was a Most Wanted Fugitive

Most wanted fugitive Frederick Cecil McLean. Photo: U.S. Marshals Service

By Steve Neavling

For 16 years, Frederick Cecil McLean had evaded capture while on the U.S. Marshals Service’ Most Wanted List. 

Then a resident in a small South Carolina town checked on her elderly neighbor earlier this month and discovered his decomposing body inside his home. 

That neighbor was McLean, who was wanted on child molestation charges in San Diego County. He was living under an alias. 

“The discovery of Frederick McLean’s body marks an end to the manhunt, but the investigation continues,” U.S. Marshals Service Director Ronald Davis said in a statement. “I want to personally thank the men and women of the Oconee County Sheriff’s Office and the Oconee County Coroner’s Office who dedicated hundreds of man hours helping the Marshals identify the body and gather evidence allowing us to gain a better picture of McLean’s life as a fugitive.

During an autopsy on Nov. 15, the fingerprints on the body matched McLean’s. 

No foul play was suspected in his death. 

McLean, 70, was wanted on multiple counts of sexual assault on child and was considered a high risk for sexually assaulting young girls. One of the victims alleged McLean assaulted her more than 100 times over a seven-year period beginning when she was 5 years old.

“We wish McLean’s fate had been determined by a court of law 15 years ago,” U.S. Marshal Steve Stafford of the Southern District of California said. “The investigators working on this case never gave up. We hope McLean’s death brings some sense of closure for the victims and their families, especially knowing he can never hurt another child.”


President Biden Nominates Ronald Davis to Serve As Head of U.S. Marshals Service

Ronald Davis with President Obama. (Photo via Twitter)

By Steve Neavling

President Biden on Friday nominated Ronald Davis to serve as director of the U.S. Marshals Service. 

Davis is a former police chief who served in the Obama administration as director of the Justice Department’s Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS).  

Davis has a long career in law enforcement. He served for eight years as chief of the East Palo Alto Police Department and 20 years with the Oakland Police Department in California. 

In December 2014, President Obama appointed him to serve as executive director of the Task Force on 21st Century Policing. 

“Davis was recognized for his innovative community efforts and for working collaboratively with the community to dramatically reduce crime and violence in a city once named as the murder capital of the United States,” Biden’s administration said in a news release.

Davis is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine Reducing Racial Inequalities in the Criminal Justices System Committee. 

Davis received a bachelor’s degree from Southern Illinois University and completed the Senior Executives in State and Local Government Program at Harvard University Kennedy School of Government.

U.S. Marshals Rescue 16 Missing Children in Philadelphia Area

U.S. Marshals prepare to make an arrest. (Stock photo via USMS)

By Steve Neavling

The U.S. Marshals Service in Philadelphia rescued 16 missing children during a four-week operation dubbed “Safeguard.”

At least four of the children were connected to child sex trafficking, officials said in a news release. 

The multi-agency operation began on Feb. 15. 

The children were considered to be “some of the most at-risk and challenging recovery cases” because they had been victims of abuse or had medical or mental health issues. 

“I applaud the exceptional cooperation among our respective agencies in combating this most abhorrent affront to society,” U.S. Marshal Eric Gartner of the Eastern District of Pennsylvania. “Our hope is for a better future for the 16 children we recovered; our resolve remains steadfast in finding other children in peril.”

Over the past five years, the U.S. Marshals Service has recovered three-quarters of the missing children it has investigated. Of those, 72% were found within seven days. Since 2015, U.S. Marshals have recovered more than 1,700 missing children. 

Deputy U.S. Marshal Who Was Critically Injured by Gunman Released from Hospital

Deputy U.S. Marshal is released from the hospital. Photo via U.S. Marshals Service.

By Steve Neavling

A deputy U.S. Marshal who was shot while trying to arrest a fugitive in Baltimore earlier this month has been released from the hospital. 

The U.S. Marshals Service said he will “complete his recovery at home amongst his friends and family.”

“We are grateful for those who worked vigorously to save the deputy marshal’s life and for all the well wishes sent from both the public and our brothers and sisters in law enforcement,” the agency tweeted. “Due to privacy concerns, the USMS will not identify the officer involved in the shooting.”

The deputy Marshal was critically injured and on life support after he was shot by Donta Green, 30, who was wanted on numerous charges for allegedly shooting at police several days earlier. Marshals returned fire and killed Green.  

FBI: Accused Facebook Killer in Cleveland ‘Could Be a Lot of Places’

Steve Stephens, via Facebook.

Steve Stephens, via Facebook.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The Cleveland man who posted a video on Facebook depicting him killing an elderly man in broad daylight on Sunday afternoon “could be a lot of places,” the FBI said.

The FBI and U.S. Marshals Service joined what has become a nationwide manhunt after Steve Stephens is accused of shooting a 74-year-old man and bragging about killing a dozen others on Sunday afternoon.

The FBI also is offering a $50,000 reward for information about Stephens’ whereabouts.

An aggravated murder warrant has been issued for Stephens, who has not been seen since posting the video.

“Obviously this individual is armed and dangerous, and quite frankly, at this point he could be a lot of places,” said Stephen D. Anthony, special agent in charge of the FBI in Cleveland. “He could be nearby, he could be far away, anywhere in between.”

The FBI has erected billboards of Steve Stephens as far away as Salt Lake City.

President Obama Won’t Nominate Interim ATF, U.S. Marshals Service Heads for Confirmation to Permanent Posts

ATF head Thomas Brandon.

ATF head Thomas Brandon.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

President Obama has decided he won’t nominate permanent leaders to head the ATF and U.S. Marshals Service, The Hill reports.

That means that the interim department heads will stay in their positions until the end of Obama’s administration next year, the Justice Department announced Monday.

That decision means that neither U.S. Marshals Service Acting Director David Harlow nor interim ATF head Thomas Brandon will face Senate confirmation hearings.

It was expected that confirmation hearings would be difficult and timely, “especially as scrutiny ramps up in the months ahead of next year’s presidential election,” The Hill wrote.

Together, they “have demonstrated themselves to be outstanding public servants and extraordinary partners in the work of building a stronger, safer nation,” Attorney General Loretta Lynch said in a statement announcing the decision not to seek Senate-confirmed replacements.

U.S. Law Enforcement Officials in Israel Learning About Counterterrorism

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com
Assistant Director Mike Prout of the U.S. Marshals Service was among a group of U.S. law enforcement officials who are currently in Israel attending seminars on terrorism.

A delegation of executives are participating in an Anti-Defamation League (ADL) National Counter-Terrorism Seminar (NCTS) from March 8-16, and meeting with security experts, intelligence analysts and commanders in the Israel National Police. There are also some law enforcement officials from other countries attending.

As part of the program, the ADL says the group will attend high-level briefings on the operational response to terrorism, border and airport security, maintaining safety and access to holy sites, the role of advanced technology in policing, and use of media during a crisis. 

“The purpose and goals of the seminar are to share best practices and lessons learned in fighting terrorism and to increase cooperation between American law enforcement and their Israeli counterparts in order to better protect the citizens of these two democratic nations, ” David Friedman, Director of National Law Enforcement Initiatives for ADL, said in a statement to ticklethewire.com.

Those participating include: the President of the  International Association of Chiefs of Police, First Vice President, International Association of Chiefs of Police, First Deputy Superintendent, Chicago Police Department; Inspector, New York City Police; ,Deputy Assistant Director, Naval Criminal Investigative Service; Director, National Operations Center, U.S. Department of Homeland Security;  Executive Associate Director, Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Homeland Security Investigations;  Colonel, Austrian National Police; Lieutenant Colonel, Italian National Policel Chief of Police for the Baton Rouge Police Department; Kansas City Police Chief;  Arlington, Tex., Police Chief; and Deputy Denver Police Chief.

Ooops! U.S. Marshals Service Loses Track of at Least 2,000 Encrypted Two-Way Radios

 
By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Here’s an embarrassing revelation about the U.S. Marshals Service.

Devlin Barrett of the Wall Street Journal reports that the agency has lost track of at least 2,000 encrypted two-way radios and other communication devices valued at millions of dollars.

The Journal cites internal agency documents, and notes that “some within the agency view as a security risk for federal judges, endangered witnesses and others.”

Barrett writes:

The problem, which stretches back years, was laid out in detail to agency officials at least as early as 2011, when the Marshals were deploying new versions of the radios they use to securely communicate in the field. Agency leaders continued to have difficulty tracking their equipment even after they were warned about the problems by an internal technology office, according to the documents, which were obtained through Freedom of Information Act requests.

To read more click here.