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Tag: university of north carolina

Obama Task Force to Address Poor Handling of Sexual Assaults on College Campuses

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

What started as a complaint from two students about how the University of North Carolina handled their sexual assaults has spread across the nation’s colleges and attracted the attention of President Obama.

The USA Today reports that Annie E. Clark and Andrea Pino were so outraged that university officials blamed them for the assaults that they wrote a Title IX complaint against the school and filed it with the Department of Education in 2013.

“What Annie and I realized was for this to be effective, not just at Carolina, but historically something that would make other things happen, we had to make this bigger. We had to make it a movement,” Pino says. “And we had to come out. We couldn’t stay in the closet about our experiences.”

Worried about the treatment of other victims at universities across the country, the women shared their stories and encouraged others to file complaints.

“Nobody else was really doing it,” Clark told the USA Today. “We knew the law. We had our personal stories, and we kind of put the two together.”

A task forced created by Obama was expected to make its recommendations this week about addressing the complaints at universities, where one in five women is the victim of an attempted or completed rape.

Sentencing Shift Gives New Leverage to Prosecutors

By RICHARD A. OPPEL Jr.
New York Times

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — After decades of new laws to toughen sentencing for criminals, prosecutors have gained greater leverage to extract guilty pleas from defendants and reduce the number of cases that go to trial, often by using the threat of more serious charges with mandatory sentences or other harsher penalties.

Some experts say the process has become coercive in many state and federal jurisdictions, forcing defendants to weigh their options based on the relative risks of facing a judge and jury rather than simple matters of guilt or innocence. In effect, prosecutors are giving defendants more reasons to avoid having their day in court.

“We now have an incredible concentration of power in the hands of prosecutors,” said Richard E. Myers II, a former assistant United States attorney who is now an associate professor of law at the University of North Carolina. He said that so much influence now resides with prosecutors that “in the wrong hands, the criminal justice system can be held hostage.”

To read the full story click here.

 

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