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Tag: tv

Showtime’s ‘The Comey Rule’ Debuts: It’s ‘a Horror Film’

“The Comey Rule.” Photo by Ben Mark Holzberg/CBS Television Studios/Showtime

By Steve Neavling

ticklethewire.com

The Comey Rule, a two-part miniseries exploring the relationship between former FBI Director James Comey and President Trump, debuted Sunday on Showtime.

The real-life, four-hour drama features Jeff Daniels as Comey and Brendan Gleeson as Trump.

“The Comey Rule is a horror film,” Slate wrote, “and the monster is Donald Trump.”

The New York Times calls it “a slo-mo horror story.”

The AV Club says it’s flawed, but is “damned compelling.”

The miniseries is based, in large part, on Comey’s 2018 memo “A Higher Loyalty.”

The cast also includes Holly Hunter as Deputy Attorney General Sally Yates, Michael Kelly as Comey’s deputy Andrew McCabe, Oona Chaplin and Steven Pasquale as FBI agents Lisa Page and Peter Strzok, Kingsley Ben-Adir, as President Obama, and Jennifer Ehle as Comey’s wife Patrice.

In the first half, Comey and the FBI are investigating Hillary Clinton’s use of a private email server and are weighing whether to notify Congress of the probe.

The second part, which airs today, depicts the relationship between Comey and Trump, who ultimately fires the FBI director after he refused to pledge loyalty to the president.

Trailer: Upcoming Miniseries The Comey Rule Features Jeff Daniels, Brendan Gleeson

The Comey Rule

By Steve Neavling

ticklethewire.com

Showtime released its trailer for its upcoming docudrama, The Comey Rule, a two-day TV series about former FBI Director James Comey and President Trump.

Jeff Daniels will star as Comey, while Brendan Gleeson portrays Trump.

The star-studded miniseries is based on Comey’s memoir A Higher Loyalty: Truth, Lies, and Leadership and will air on Sept. 27 and Sept. 28.

 

Ex-Secret Service Special Agent Takes Major role on Bravo’s New ‘Spy Games’

By Steve Neavling

ticklethewire.com

A former Secret Service special agent will appear as one of three judges on Spy Games, a new reality show on Bravo, Forbes reports.

Evy Poumpouras, who served in the protective detail for President Obama, will judge the mental and physical fitness of the contestants.

“Knowing that you don’t know everything is so important,” Poumpouras says, explaining what it takes to be a good spy. “When people think they know everything, that’s the moment when you become obsolete. If you have a big ego, you won’t make it through the training. The ability to hear what someone else is saying can help connect you to people.”

In Spy Games, the contestants share a house and spy on each other as part of regular challenges.

Poumpouras wrote a new book, “Becoming Bulletproof,” which will be published in April.

Netflix Series ‘Mindhunter’ Will Focus on Elite FBI Unit Tracking Down Serial Killer

David Fincher, via Wikipedia.

David Fincher, via Wikipedia.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Executive producers David Fincher and Charlize Theron are developing a crime drama involving the FBI for Netflix called “Mindhunter,” TV.com reports. 

The movie is based on a 1996 book, “Mind Hunter: Inside the FBI’s Elite Serial Crime Unit by former special agent John Douglas and Mark Olshaker.

Netflix and Fincher are responsible for the largely successful show, “House of Cards,” which won an Emmy for directing the show’s pilot.

The show will involve the “pursuit-of-a-serial-killer” genre, which Fincher used in his films “Se7en” and “Zodiac.”

Playwright Joe Penhall will write the series.

John Oliver Pokes Fun at Secret Service for Breaking Law to Embarrass Congressman

John Oliver screen capture.

John Oliver screen capture.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

“Last Week Tonight” host John Oliver poked fun at the recent discovery that the Secret Service tried to embarrass a Republican congressman by releasing “unflattering private information.”

Oliver pointed out that Rep. Jason Chaffetz has no problem embarrassing himself without the help of the Secret Service.

“That’s right. The Secret Service attempted to embarrass one of their biggest critics, Congressman Jason Chaffetz, by leaking his rejected application to join them, essentially behaving like the high school table of mean girls,” Oliver said before affecting a snotty teen girl’s voice, wrote Raw Story. “You only hate us because we won’t let you sit with us, Jason. Don’t look at our food. You’re making it uncool.”

Oliver ridiculed the Secret Service for breaking the law to embarrass someone who so easily embarrasses himself.

“I don’t know what’s worse here,” Oliver said. “The fact that the Secret Service is so petty that they broke the law to embarrass Jason Chaffetz, or that they’re so stupid and they didn’t realize, if you want to embarrass Jason Chaffetz, just wait, and he will do it for you.”

Other Stories of Interest

New ABC Drama ‘Quantico’ to Feature Group of FBI Recruits

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

ABC will premier a new drama, “Quantico,” on Sept. 27 about a group of FBI recruits training at Quantico Base.

The network released the first eight minutes of the show, starring Priyanka Chopra.

One of the recruits is accused of masterminding a terrorist attack in New York.

The show premiers at 10 p.m.

FBI Drama About ‘Young, Sexy’ Recruits to Premiere on ABC This Season

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

A new drama about a group of “young, sexy” FBI recruits has been picked up by ABC in what will be a busy pilot season, A.V. Club reports.

The show, Quantico, features the recruits at a real-life training center.

But there’s a twist.

“One of the recruits turns out to be a terrorist [who] created the most severe terrorist attack on U.S. soil since 9/11,” the show’s official description reads.

 

Is the Chicago Judge Going too Far by Withholding Jurors Names After the Verdict?

Allan Lengel

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Imagine taxpayers spending millions of dollars collectively trying an Illinois governor, and in the end, the case all but collapses. The jurors only convict on one of 24 counts . They end up deadlocked on the rest.

Imagine that. Yes,it’s not too hard, considering it happened in the first trial of ex-Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich. Isn’t it fair to assume people want to know why the case collapsed? Can we go as far as to say they have a right to know? I’d say Yes.

So I speak with some mixed feelings when I read that the U.S. District Judge James Zagel in Chicago on Tuesday ruled that he won’t release the names of the jurors until 9 a.m., the day after the verdict in the retrial of Blagojevich, which begins April 20.

The judge wants to  protect the jurors. Fair.

Zagel raises some good points: He says the press after the first trial hounded the jurors to find out what they were thinking. They knocked on doors. A TV helicopter reportedly flew up above a home where one jury was staying, the Associated Press reported. The judge has said the press was  obnoxious, that reporters went too far.

I’m for some balance. Jurors have rights.  But so does the public — the right to know. At minimum, the judge — and in other high profile cases as well — should strongly suggest — and not just throw it out as an option — that at least one of the jurors should brief the press after the verdict. Judges have a way of being persuasive, particularly after they bond with jurors during a trial. They can make it happen. And maybe that way, reporters wouldn’t have to knock on doors.

We have a right to know: What the prosecution, what the defense  did right, what they did wrong. Was it taxpayers’ money well spent? Did justice — regardless of the verdict — prevail?

There should be dignity in these proceedings. No question. But citizens — the lion’s share who don’t have time to attend these trials  — have the right to know what’s going on in the courts.

And while I’m at it, frankly, it’s time to bring television cameras into federal court to let citizens — some who have never stepped foot in a federal court — see what’s going on.  Worse yet, some federal courts, like in  Alexandria, Va., do everything to make it difficult for the press to do its job. The court there doesn’t allow reporters to carry cell phones (this is the 21st Century) and laptops (granted they shouldn’t be used in the courtrooms).

I have to commend federal courthouses like the one in Washington, which try to accommodate the press. Reporters can carry cell phones and bring a laptop into the courthouse.  And during some trials, like the one in D.C. involving Sen. Ted Stevens, the court set up an overflow room with TV monitors where reporters used laptops to report to the public what was going on. Other courthouses should follow suit.

Federal court is a dignified place.  But let’s strike a balance. Let’s not lose sight of the fact the people have a right to know what’s going on!