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Tag: terrorism

FBI Raids NY Homes in Search of Terrorists; No Arrests, No Explosives Found

It sounds like something the FBI needed to check out. But is it anything earth shattering? Who knows? Sen. Schumer described it as preventative movenew-york-map.

By RAYMOND HERNANDEZ and KAREN ZRAICK
New York Times
WASHINGTON – At least two apartments in Queens were raided on Monday after they had been visited in the last week by a suspected associate of Al Qaeda, according to officials.

No arrests were made and no explosives or other weapons were found in the raids, which were conducted by the Joint Terrorism Task Force in New York, the officials said. Law enforcement officials also did not identify any specific terror plot or any target of a planned attack.

For Full Story

NY Appeals Court Allows Evidence in Questionable Wiretap

Did the Appeals Court in N.Y. rule properly by allowing evidence from a questionable wiretap? It’s certainly questionable.  The lower court said investigators did not do enough to prove a wiretap was warranted.

istock photo

istock photo

By David Kravets
Wired

Despite refusing to “endorse” the government’s tactics in securing a warrant for a wiretap, a federal appeals court is ruling that authorities could use the fruits of their questionable eavesdropping in prosecuting an alleged drug dealer.

The 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals overturned a lower-court judge who last year suppressed the 50 grams of crack cocaine that was evidence in the case against a man originally suspected of plotting terrorism against the United States.

The lower court said a magistrate judge erroneously issued the warrant, breaching the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968, which was designed to strike a balance between law enforcement and “the privacy rights of the individual.”

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Read Court Ruling

In FBI Press Release: Cases That Can’t be Discussed Are More Impressive Than the Ones that Can

istock_000000378393xsmall23By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.cojm

WASHINGTON — FBI officials often stop short of talking about potential terrorist plots they’ve managed to head off, citing  security concerns.

Unfortunately, what they can say isn’t always as impressive as what they can’t.

Take this week’s press release entitled: “FBI Weapons of Mass Destruction Directorate Recent Accomplishments” . Sounds  intriguing. Exciting.

“We are unrelenting in our efforts to protect the American people from weapons of mass destruction,” says Dr. Vahid Majidi, assistant director, Weapons of Mass Destruction Directorate in the press release. “Whether it is a threatening letter filled with “powder” to investigating a major radiological incident….”

But the release falls short of our imagination. It mentions several cases in which people mailed harmless powder or made threats to judges. No al Qaeda. No jihads. A little disappointing.

Paul Bresson, an FBI spokesman, said the release was meant to show “if anything, law enforcement is paying attention to all threats including those in the end that turnout not to (involve) threatening substances.” He said those threats can seem very real to the people who receive the fake powder.

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Suspected Terrorist Convicted in Atlanta in Trial That Explored Youthful Extremists and the Internet

The Internet has become a staple for terrorists. This  trial illustrated that.  Federal authorities have been working to monitor the terrorists activities on the Internet and have actually shut down sites. But it’s a daunting task considering there’s so much activity out there. How do you catch it all — or most?

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By Sebastian Rotella
Los Angeles Times
An Atlanta jury on Wednesday found a 23-year-old man guilty of aiding terrorist groups after a trial that explored a subculture of youthful extremists who used the Internet to plot attacks and form a loose network connecting North America, Europe and South Asia.

Ehsanul Sadequee, the U.S.-born son of Bangladeshi immigrants, faces up to 60 years in prison after being convicted of conspiracy to materially support terrorists. The jury found that he had discussed attacks with accused militants in Toronto and Sarajevo, Bosnia-Herzegovina.

Along with another Georgia man convicted in June, Sadequee drove to Washington in 2005 to film the Pentagon and other potential targets, then e-mailed the scouting videos to British citizens who since have been convicted of terrorism charges.

“It’s a good example of how these Islamic extremists across the world connect up and start to organize using the Internet,” David Nahmias, the U.S. attorney in Atlanta, said in a telephone interview. “The Internet is very hard to control, and it is exploited by the bad guys.”

For Full Story

Terrorism Trial Begins Today in N.Y. For Atlanta Man

When does someone officially become a terrorist? When they train? When they talk about violence? When they’re in the planning stage of an attack? When they belong to a certain group? These are questions that continue to pop up during these type of trials.

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By The Associated Press
Jury selection is scheduled to begin in a New York courtroom Monday in the trial of a 23-year-old Atlanta man who prosecutors say tried to aid overseas terrorists.

Ehsanul Islam Sadequee could face up to 60 years in prison on four charges that he conspired to help terror suspects wage “violent jihad” on America. Jury selection is expected to last at least a week.

Sadequee has pleaded not guilty. But prosecutors say they have overwhelming evidence against him, including a series of short homemade videos that he and a friend, Syed Haris Ahmed, made of Washington landmarks.

For Full Story

Are Feds Hyping Latest Terrorism Case in N.C. ?

It’s often hard to tell just how threatening some of the home grown groups are. And at what point do they clearly become a threat and a terrorist? Is there such a thing as waiting too long to find out?

fbi map

fbi map

By Jeff Stein
Spy Talk
WASHINGTON — The feds have been hyping their domestic terrorism cases for several years now, and the arrest of seven North Carolina men this week appears to be no exception.

The headliners in the case, of course, are ordinary folks Daniel Patrick Boyd and his two sons, who prosecutors say led three lives: good family men, likeable neighbors and secret terrorists.

The father’s path to terrorism began in 1989, according to the indictment unsealed this week, when Daniel Boyd “travelled to Pakistan and Afghanistan, where he received military style training in terrorist training camps for the purpose of engaging in violent jihad.”

During 1989 and 1991, they say, “Boyd fought in Afghanistan against the Soviet Union.”

He would have been 19 at the time, all of which a former CIA station chief in Pakistan, Milt Bearden, finds odd.

“The Afghans didn’t need much help,” said Bearden. They accepted Arabs like Osama Bin Laden because they brought money, or miscreants that the Gulf States emptied from their jails, he said, but “their fondest hope was that they would step on a landmine.”

For Full Story

Read Indictment

Mexican Police Commander, Wife and 4 Children Murdered: Could Be Related to Drug War

mexico-border-signThe motive has not been determined. But it very well may end up being the drug cartels, which are hoping through violence to make the Mexican and U.S. government back off. Meanwhile, on Wednesday the Associated Press reported that Mexican authorities had found a Mexican radio journalist beaten, dead and partially buried in Acapulco. Whatever help the U.S. is providing in this violent battle, apparently it’s not enough.

By MIGUEL ANGEL HERNANDEZ
The Associated Press
VERACRUZ, Mexico — Gunmen shot up and torched the home of a Mexican police commander Wednesday, killing the officer, his wife and his four children, including a 6-year-old boy.

The interior of the house in the Gulf coast city of Veracruz was completely burned, and its facade was riddled with bullet holes. Inside, police found the bodies of municipal police commander Jesus Antonio Romero and his family, Veracruz state Public Safety Secretary Sergio Lopez said.

Police said the youngest was a 6-year-old boy and the oldest was a 15-year-old girl.

For Full Story

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST

All American Kid Accused of Being Homegrown Terrorist

It’s hard to fathom that an all American kid could take this route. But in life, things aren’t always as simple and clear cut as we would hope.

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By Carrie Johnson and Spencer S. Hsu
Washington Post
WASHINGTON — Daniel Patrick Boyd, once a defensive lineman at T.C. Williams High School, is an unlikely symbol of the homegrown terrorist threat.

The son of a Marine, Boyd spent his early years in the Washington suburbs living a typical American childhood. Recently, he blended with his family into a picturesque suburb of Raleigh, N.C., where he gardened and was friendly with his neighbors.

But law enforcement officials, including four SWAT teams that deployed to Boyd’s home this week, point to the Muslim convert as the latest example of a radicalized American who exported jihad.

Boyd, 39, is scheduled to appear in federal court in North Carolina on Thursday with his two sons and four other young men he allegedly instructed in militant techniques.

For Full Story