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Tag: Spy

Suspected Spy For Israel Was Political and Had Plenty Expenses

And now comes the head scratching and analysis of a brilliant scientist. Why did he risk his career to try and spy for Israel? It’s not all that complicated once you start dissecting his life. The following report gives us a pretty good insight into Stewart Nozette.

Stewart Nozette/nasa photo

Stewart Nozette/nasa photo

By Del Quentin Wilber and Maria Glod
Washington Post
WASHINGTON — By all accounts, Stewart D. Nozette is a brilliant and creative scientist, an astronomer who once sketched a key part of a lunar mission on the back of a cocktail napkin and daydreamed of colonizing the moon.

In a recent photograph, he appears the caricature of a NASA geek: a pudgy man wearing an ugly green shirt with a pen protruding from the pocket. Wisps of his hair scatter in all directions.

But Nozette is not your stereotypically shy, reserved genius. He is ambitious and unafraid to engage in political combat. He has been known to prod public officials and lawmakers to fund his programs or scuttle those of rivals, friends and colleagues said. He has donated more than $35,000 to politicians and causes.

And, according to recently unsealed court documents, he stole lots of government money to finance personal credit cards, mortgages, car loans and maintenance on his swimming pool.

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OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST

Accused Spy For Israel Had Been Busted for Overbilling NASA

No question Stewart D. Nozette was a smart scientist. But a smart criminal? He pleaded guilty in January to overbilling NASA. You’d think once you’re on the government’s radar you’d avoid — or least be careful — about doing foolish things. You’d think.

Stewart Nozette/nasa photo

Stewart Nozette/nasa photo

By Del Quentin Wilber
Washington Post Staff Writer
WASHINGTON — Stewart D. Nozette, the Chevy Chase scientist accused last week of attempted espionage, pleaded guilty in January to overbilling NASA and the Defense Department more than $265,000 for contracting work, according to court records unsealed Friday.

Nozette, 52, was arrested last week by federal authorities and accused of selling sensitive government secrets for $11,000 to an FBI agent posing as an Israeli intelligence operative. He faces a sentence of up to life in prison if convicted of attempted espionage.

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Calif. Man Who Says He Spied on Mosques Wants $10 Mil in Damages From FBI

Using informants can create complications. Craig Monteilh has become one of those complications the FBI would rather do without. It will be interesting to see how this gets resolved.

mosqueBy Associated Press
SANTA ANA, Calif — An Orange County man who says he spied on mosques for the FBI has filed a claim alleging the agency did not pay him for his services and allowed him to be sent to prison for actions he took as an informant.

Craig Monteilh, a fitness consultant from Irvine, seeks $10 million in damages from the FBI and would be allowed to file a lawsuit if the agency denies his request.

The claim, dated Saturday, alleges the FBI failed to pay Monteilh $100,000 and provide witness protection as part of an exit strategy from his work as an undercover informant in Southern California mosques.

Monteilh, 46, also accuses the FBI of letting him serve eight months in prison on a grand theft charge he said was related to his work on a case involving the illegal distribution of steroids and human growth hormone.

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Ex-Army Mechanical Engineer, 85, Pleads Guilty to Giving Israelis Classified Documents

An 85-year-old man who spied for Israel may not have to spend the final stretch of his retirement behind bars. Judgment day is Feb. 13.

By LARRY NEUMEISTER
Associated Press Writer
NEW YORK — An 85-year-old former Army mechanical engineer pleaded guilty to conspiracy Tuesday and admitted he passed classified documents to the Israelis in the 1970s and ’80s.
Ben-ami Kadish told U.S. Magistrate Judge Theodore H. Katz he believed the government promised it would not seek a prison term when he is sentenced Feb. 13. Assistant U.S. Attorney Iris Lan said prosecutors promised only that they would not oppose or challenge a sentence that included no prison time.
Kadish, who lives in Monroe Township, N.J., pleaded guilty to only one of the four conspiracy charges he originally faced.
Kadish was accused of taking home classified documents from 1979 to 1985 when he worked at the Picatinny Arsenal in Dover, N.J. The government said he let an Israeli agent photograph documents, including information about nuclear weapons, a modified version of an F-15 fighter jet and the U.S. Patriot missile air defense system.
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