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Tag: sexism

FBI Links Murder of New Jersey Judge’s Husband to California Slaying of Another ‘Men’s Rights’ Attorney

Roy Den Hollander, via Twitter.

By Steve Neavling

ticklethewire.com

The “anti-feminist” lawyer suspected of fatally shooting the son of a New Jersey federal judge and wounding her husband at their family home on Sunday is now a suspect in the murder of a rival “men’s rights” attorney in California.

“We are now engaged with the San Bernardino California Sheriff’s Office and have evidence linking the murder of Marc Angelucci to FBI Newark subject Roy Den Hollander,” the FBI’s said in a statement.  “This investigation is ongoing.”

Hollander, 72, who allegedly posed as a FedEx deliveryman before shooting the son and husband of U.S. District Judge Esther Salas, turned the gun on himself and was found dead in Liberty, N.Y. In addition to finding a FedEx packaged addressed to Salas in Hollander’s car, authorities also found papers mentioning Marc Angelucci, who was fatally shot at his home in California, The Daily Beast reports.

The FBI said investigators found evidence that Hollander was in California at the time of the Angelucci shooting. It was not immediately clear what other evidence the FBI had to link Hollander to Angelucci’s death.

Top FBI Agent in Washington State Claims She Was Discriminated Against for Job Promotions

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Laura M.  Laughlin, the top FBI agent in Washington state, says she continues to be discriminated against nearly two years after filing a gender discrimination suit against the bureau, McClatchy reports.

Special agent-in-charge of the FBI’s Seattle field office, Laughlin contends in an updated legal filing that her gender has cost her jobs in other cities, including Washington, Philadelphia and Los Angeles.

“The FBI has consistently and intentionally refused to promote (Laughlin) because of her gender,” Laughlin’s attorney, David Wachtel, wrote in an Aug. 15 court filing.

Wachtel added that Laughlin was targeted “because she has opposed the FBI’s gender-based and race-based discrimination against herself and others.”

Whatever the case, Laughlin’s job puts her at the head the Seattle Office and nine satellite locations. She leads a team of 300 agents and support personnel, McClatchy wrote.

First Two Female FBI Agents Faced Challenges

Joanne Pierce Misko, in red and lower right, and Susan Roley Malone, seen at the FBI Training Academy in 1972, and today, were the first women of the modern era to become special agents.

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Women were not allowed to become FBI agents until weeks after longtime FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover died, the FBI reports in a series about female special agents.

The bureau changed its policy, in part because of new equal-rights laws.

The first women of the modern era to become special agents were former Marine Susan Roley Malone and nun Joanne Pierce Misko, who were not always embraced by colleagues.

After clearing every hurdle, the doubters subsided, the FBI reported.

The pair completed training in October 1972.

Here’s the FBI’s story as it appears on the agency’s website: 

They were known as the nun and the Marine. The respective backgrounds of Joanne Pierce Misko and Susan Roley Malone could not have been more dissimilar. But 40 years ago, on July 17, 1972, the two women were drawn together by a shared goal—to become FBI special agents.

Up until then, under the leadership of longtime FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover, only men could be agents. But just weeks after Hoover died in May 1972, the Bureau’s acting director—motivated in part by new equal rights laws—changed the men-only policy that had been in place since the Prohibition Era. So on a balmy Monday exactly four decades ago, the two women assembled with 43 similarly pressed and starched men at FBI Headquarters to take their oath before heading down to the FBI Training Academy in Quantico, Virginia for 14 weeks (now 20) of physical and mental conditioning.

The new agent training was tough enough on its own—firearms, strength, endurance, self-defense, academics. But for Misko and Malone, who were expected to meet the requirements long in place for males, there was the added dimension of their novelty, which was not universally embraced at first.

“I’m sure when they first saw that there were two women in their class it was like, ‘Oh, we got them,’” Misko recalled in a recent interview. Malone, who had already broken some stereotypes as a Marine, remembers a fellow classmate confronting her during a break, brusquely asking why she thought she could be an FBI agent. “And I sat down and I talked to him,” Malone stated. “I said, ‘I love my country just like you do. I want to be here for the same reasons that you want to be here.’” He heard her out. And in the weeks that followed, the two women set out to demonstrate that they belonged in their coveted slots in New Agent Class 73-1. They won over some of the most ardent doubters by rising to every challenge and helping their classmates over some hurdles along the way. In the crucible of training, the group bonded quickly.

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