Links

Columnists



Site Search


Entire (RSS)
Comments (RSS)

Archive Calendar

August 2020
S M T W T F S
« Jul    
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031  

Guides

How to Become a Bounty Hunter



Tag: Sears Tower

Terrorists Convictions Upheld in Plot to Bomb 110-Story Building and FBI Offices

By Danny Fenster
ticklethewire.com

The appeals of Narseal Batiste and followers were rejected in Atlanta on Tuesday, reports the Associated Press. Batiste and four others were convicted of plotting, in conjunction with al-Qaida, to destroy the 110-story Willis Tower in Chicago and to bomb FBI offices in several cities in May of 2009.

Batiste, cited as the group’s ringleader, questioned the sufficiency of the evidence, the FBI’s use of an informant posing as a member of al-Qaida and one juror’s dismissal amid deliberations in the trial. A three-judge panel in Atlanta’s 11th US Circuit Court of Appeals rejected the claims.

The men were convicted of providing material support to al-Qaida in addition to the plan to take down the hulking, 110-story Chicago skyscraper formerly known as the Sears Tower. Their stated goal was to “overthrow the US government,” according to the AP.

After two mistrials, they were convicted the third time around.

To read more click here.

Jurors Asked About Sept. 11 in Trial Involving Plot to Blow Up FBI Offices

The ghost of Sept. 11 will forever leave a indelible mark on this country. Can jurors truly set aside the event when sitting on a jury involving suspected terrorists? That’s the question of the day down in Miami.

By CURT ANDERSON
Associated Press
MIAMI – Finding lingering emotions from the Sept. 11 terror attacks emerged as central to questioning prospective jurors Tuesday in the third trial of a group accused of plotting with al-Qaida to destroy Chicago’s Sears Tower and blow up FBI offices.
Prosecutors and defense lawyers want to ensure that the jurors ultimately chosen to hear the case against the six men accused of being a budding al-Qaida cell do not have biases because of the attacks more than seven years ago.
“Have the events of Sept. 11 or any other terrorist act affected you to such an extent that it would make it difficult for you to sit and listen to evidence in this case and be fair to both the government and the defendants?” was one question for the first 34 potential jurors.
Most jurors said they believed they could set aside any Sept. 11-related feelings and be impartial. But some were not so sure.
For Full Story