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Tag: Rio Grande Valley

Kevin Oaks, Chief of Border Patrol’s Rio Grande Valley Sector, Retires

Kevin Oaks

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

The head of Border Patrol’s Rio Grande Valley Sector announced Thursday that he is retiring.

The Monitor reports that Kevin W. Oaks spent his last day on the job Thursday following three decades with the federal agency.

Oaks’ former positions included operations division chief in Washington D.C., chief patrol agent of the Buffalo sector and the commander of the agency’s Tactical Unit.

As chief of the Rio Grande sector beginning in April 2014, Oaks oversaw more than 3,000 agents, nine stations and three traffic checkpoints.

Border Patrol Beefs Up Security After Claim That Agent Kidnapped

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

A claim that a Border Patrol agent was kidnapped by a Mexican cartel has prompted the agency to increase safety in some border towns, UPI reports.

As new safety measures are taken, Border Patrol officials said no agents are missing from the Rio Grande Valley sector, but they are still trying to reach some off-duty agents.

One precaution being taken in the El Pastor sector, which includes 268 miles, agents are required to keep in constant contact with headquarters, UPI wrote.

“At this time, the authenticity of the phone call received by the La Joya Police Department is uncorroborated. Nevertheless through an abundance of caution, El Paso sector has enacted safety protocols sector wide. The sector maintains communication with headquarters of the Border Patrol and Customs and Border Protection,” the U.S. Border Patrol said.

Cameras Put Additional Eyes on Smugglers in Rio Grande Valley, Lead to Arrests

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Cameras are helping Border Patrol make arrests in areas where agents can’t always monitor, the Brownsville Herald reports.

The technology in the lower Rio Grande Valley also helps agents keep an eye on the suspects while authorities move in. Border Patrol spokesman Henry Mendiola said told the Herald.

Last week, agents seized more than 800 pounds of marijuana after a camera spotted nine people carrying bundles.

Without the cameras, agents may have gotten away, Border Patrol said.

“In the past, when a sensor was tripped we’d have to physically go out there and see if something happened,” Border Patrol spokesman Henry Mendiola said. said. “But with this technology, we can continuously monitor a situation until agents are able to respond. … It allows us to do our job more efficiently and effectively.”