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Tag: retirement

Special Agent in Charge of FBI’s Miami Field Office George Piro Retires

By Steve Neavling

George Piro, special agent in charge of the FBI’s Miami Field Office, is retiring following allegations that he improperly transferred a case involving a Florida sheriff to South Carolina, FloridaBulldog.org reports.

Piro, who’s known for interrogating former Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein, is a 23-year FBI veteran who led the Miami Field Office between 2014 and 2017 and November 2018 to date. He also served as director of the International Operations Division at FBI headquarters and held a variety of other positions since joining the bureau in 1999. 

His official retirement date is June 30. 

According to sources who spoke with FloridaBulldog, a subordinate complained that Piro improperly transferred his office’s probe of Broward Sheriff Gregory Tony to South Carolina. 

A source said Piro made the decision because he didn’t want his office to be responsible for arresting Broward’s first Black sheriff and that making an arrest would harm his office’s relationship with the sheriff’s office. 

Tony was accused of fraud, kickbacks and bid-rigging. 

Neither Piro nor the FBI commented for the story. 

Fired McCabe Wins Back Pension 3 Years After Trump Fired Him Just Before Retirement

Former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe, via FBI.

By Steve Neavling

Former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe, who was fired just hours before his scheduled retirement in 2018, won back his pension and other benefits. 

McCabe filed a lawsuit against the Justice Department in August 2019, saying he was unjustly terminated at the “unlawful whims” of then-President Donald Trump. McCabe initiated special counsel’s Russia investigation, which Trump baselessly called a “witch hunt.”

On Thursday, McCabe reached a settlement with the Justice Department, which rescinded his dismissal and allowed him to retire with full pension benefits, The Washington Post reports.

“Politics should never play a role in the fair administration of justice and civil service personnel decisions,” McCabe said in a statement through the Arnold & Porter law firm. “. . . I hope that this result encourages the men and women of the FBI to continue to protect the American people by standing up for the truth and doing their jobs without fear of political retaliation.”

One of the firm’s attorney, Murad Hussain, said civil servants have a duty to the Constitution, not a political party or individual. 

“This settlement and the district court’s rulings make clear that attempts to corrupt the federal workforce through partisan intimidation and improper political influence will not go unanswered,” Hussain said.

Retired Executive Assistant Director of FBI Is Driving a School Bus to Help with Shortage

Michael Mason, retired executive assistant director of the FBI. Screenshot via FBI.

By Steve Neavling

Michael Mason, a retired executive assistant director of the FBI, could be traveling or playing golf after a long, successful career. 

Instead, Mason recently began driving a school bus in Chesterfield County, Virginia, CBS affiliate WTVR reports.

Mason decided to get behind the wheel after hearing about a shortage in school bus drivers. 

“When the pandemic struck there were so many people that were doing so many extra things. People like you who still have to get out here. People like grocery store workers. People like telecommunications workers. All kinds of folks who still had to do their job,” Mason said. “And I felt like I can be doing something to help in this post-pandemic recovery.”

Mason retired from the FBI in 2007 and worked as chief security officer for Verizon from 2008 to 2020 before retiring.

Chesterfield County Public School cast Mason in a promotional video

Mason said he’s just doing his part to make the world a little better.

“I believe if all of us gave a little something,” he said. “Wow, how we could impact the world. How we could change the world.”

Mason worked for the FBI for 23 years and served as special agent in charge of the Sacramento Division and assistant director in charge of the Washington Field Office. 

Four-Legged ‘Special Agent’ Honored at Retirement Ceremony at FBI’s Newark Field Office

Roxy, a Belgian Malinois, was honored for her work at the FBI. Photo: FBI.

By Steve Neavling

She was a brave, dedicated crime-fighter for the FBI. 

After more than seven years at the Newark Field Office, Roxy, a Belgian Malinois who turned 9 in June, retired with her handler Special Agent Scott Nawrocki on Dec. 26, 2020. 

But the canine’s well-deserved retirement ceremony was delayed because of COVID-19. On Wednesday, she was finally honored for her work. 

“K9 Roxy has been an indispensable member of the FBI team,” George M. Crouch, Jr., special agent in charge of the Newark Field Office, said in a statement. “Her hard work and dedication have helped protect her fellow agents and the community at-large and have assisted in the apprehension of criminals. We are in her debt and wish her a healthy retirement with our gratitude.”

Roxy joined the bureau in 2013 after becoming the youngest cadet to graduate from the New Jersey Police Canine Academy at the age of 1.

 “We knew Roxy would be a great working dog as she pushed her way in front of her brothers and sisters when it came time to eat,” Nawrocki said. “She wasn’t afraid of anything and, at just four weeks old, she was already bounding up and down the stairs.”

During her career, Roxy responded to active shootings, searched for explosives, worked on protective details of three attorneys general and two FBI directors, helped secure the Super Bowl at MetLife Stadium in East Rutherford, N.J., and even dressed as a cheerleader. 

Special Agent in Charge of FBI’s Springfield Division Sean Cox Set to Retire

FBI Special Agent Sean M. Cox

By Steve Neavling

Sean M. Cox, special agent in charge of the FBI’s Springfield Division, plans to retire next month. 

Cox, a 22-year veteran of the bureau, has led the Springfield Division since 2014. 

Cox joined the FBI in June 1999, with his first assignment at the Chicago Division, where he investigated narcotics, fugitives and counterterrorism matters.

He was promoted to supervisory special agent in the Counterterrorism Division at FBI headquarters in 2004. He managed the FBI’s Terrorist Watch List and served as the bureau’s representative to the Terrorist Screening Center (TSC). 

In 2006, Cox was promoted to a supervisory special agent in the Milwaukee Division, where he created the division’s first Field Intelligence Group. In 2009, he took over supervisory responsibilities for the division’s counterintelligence program.

Cox was promoted in 2011 to assistant special agent in charge of the National Security Branch in the St. Louis Division, where he oversaw the division’s international and domestic terrorism, counterintelligence, cyber, intelligence, crisis management, security, and surveillance and aviation programs. He also served as the leadership coordinator for the Leadership Development Program at FBI headquarters.

Before joining the FBI, Cox served in the Waukesha County Sheriff’s Department in Wisconsin. He received a bachelor of science degree in criminal justice from Mount Senario College.

‘I feel stuck:’ James Comey Is Unsure about His Future, But Pledges to Help Remove Trump from Presidency

Former FBI Director James Comey

By Steve Neavling

ticklethewire.com

Former FBI Director James Comey isn’t sure what’s next for him. But one thing is clear: He’s going to help remove Trump from the presidency.

“I feel stuck,” Comey said in a candid, nearly two-hour interview with The New York Times at his Northern Virginia home. “Like I can’t do something else. And I couldn’t look myself in the mirror if I went and did something easy.”

It wasn’t entirely clear in the interview how Comey will lend his hand in removing Trump from office, but the 58-year-old said he’d be willing to appear at the Democratic candidate’s stump speeches or even the party’s nominating convention. The former registered Republican also donated money to former law school classmate and Democratic presidential candidate, Sen. Amy Klohbuchar of Minnesota.

Comey said he has no plans to run for office, but he will be writing opining pieces for The Washington Post.

“I have a fantasy about on January 21, 2021, deleting my Twitter and moving on to something else,” Comey said. “But until then, I can’t.”

When asked about his controversial, potentially election-turning decision to reveal information about the Hillary Clinton email investigation in October 2016, Comey responded, “I wish like hell we hadn’t been involved.”

Comey believes the decision to choose transparency over concealment won’t hurt his legacy.

“I was going to say I don’t care. I’m sure I care a little,” adding, “It frustrates me in general that millions of people have a false impression of me. I wish they knew I was funnier.”

Bill Priestap Becomes Latest High-Ranking FBI Official to Leave Bureau

Bill Priestap

By Steve Neavling
Ticklethewire.com

Bill Priestap, the assistant director of the FBI’s counterintelligence division, is retiring by the end of the year.

Priestap was among the bureau’s top officials tasked with overseeing investigations involving the 2016 presidential campaign, The Wall Street Journal reports

The 20-year veteran of the bureau began his career investigating organized crime and drug cases in Chicago before ascending the ranks following the Sept. 11, 2o01, terrorist attacks.

A person familiar with the retirement said Priest’s departure has nothing to do with the controversies surrounding the presidential election investigations.

He “became eligible to retire and has chosen to do so after 20 years of service,” the FBI said in a statement.

Timothy Gallagher to Retire As Special Agent in Charge of Newark Division

Timothy Gallagher to retire as head of the FBI’s Newark Division.

By Steve Neavling
Ticklethewire.com

Timothy Gallagher, a 22-year veteran of the FBI, plans to retire as head of the bureau’s Newark Division.

Gallagher has served as special agent in charge of the field office since 2016.

His replacement has not yet been announced.

Gallagher began his FBI career as an agent in Canton, Ohio, and served as a deputy assistant director in the FBI’s Criminal Investigative division.