Links

Columnists



Site Search


Entire (RSS)
Comments (RSS)

Archive Calendar

September 2021
S M T W T F S
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
2627282930  

Guides

How to Become a Bounty Hunter



Tag: phone

Apple’s Fight Against FBI Over Unlock iPhone Heads to Congress This Week

IPhone 6By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Apple and the FBI will take their fight over a locked iPhone to Congress this week.

FBI Director James Comey is scheduled to lay out his position before the House Judiciary Committee after Apple fought a court order to help the bureau unlock an iPhone belonging to one of the San Bernardino shooters, The Hill reports. 

The same day, Apple General Counsel Bruce Sewell will make his case in testimony during a second panel.

At issue is Apple’s refusal to create software to disable a feature that wipe a phone of its memory after an incorrect password is entered 1o times in a row.

“This is a huge issue which is very complex. It should not be decided by a single district judge in California, it should be decided right here,” Sen. Angus King (I-Maine) told The Hill this week. But, he added, “I don’t think we’re ready to articulate” what legislation is needed.

FBI Director James Comey on Encrypted Phone: ‘San Bernardino Litigation Isn’t About Trying to Set a Precedent or Send Any Kind of Message’

FBI Director James Comey

FBI Director James Comey

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

The battle between the FBI and Apple is on. The FBI wants the giant company to help the bureau crack the encryption of a phone belonging to one of the terrorist in San Bernardino is a big deal.

A federal judge has ordered the company to help the FBI, but Apple has vowed to fight the case in court, saying the privacy of Americans is at issue.

Besides a legal battle, a battle is being fought on the public stage of opinion.

On Sunday night, the FBI released this statement from James Comey, director of the FBI, who has expressed great frustration over the issue of encrypted devices.

Comey stated:

The San Bernardino litigation isn’t about trying to set a precedent or send any kind of message. It is about the victims and justice.  Fourteen people were slaughtered and many more had their lives and bodies ruined.  We owe them a thorough and professional investigation under law.  That’s what this is.  The American people should expect nothing less from the FBI.

The particular legal issue is actually quite narrow. The relief we seek is limited and its value increasingly obsolete because the technology continues to evolve.  We simply want the chance, with a search warrant, to try to guess the terrorist’s passcode without the phone essentially self-destructing and without it taking a decade to guess correctly.  That’s it.  We don’t want to break anyone’s encryption or set a master key loose on the land.  I hope thoughtful people will take the time to understand that.  Maybe the phone holds the clue to finding more terrorists.  Maybe it doesn’t.  But we can’t look the survivors in the eye, or ourselves in the mirror, if we don’t follow this lead.

Reflecting the context of this heart-breaking case, I hope folks will take a deep breath and stop saying the world is ending, but instead use that breath to talk to each other.  Although this case is about the innocents attacked in San Bernardino, it does highlight that we have awesome new technology that creates a serious tension between two values we all treasure – privacy and safety.  That tension should not be resolved by corporations that sell stuff for a living.  It also should not be resolved by the FBI, which investigates for a living.  It should be resolved by the American people deciding how we want to govern ourselves in a world we have never seen before.  We shouldn’t drift to a place – or be pushed to a place by the loudest voices – because finding the right place, the right balance, will matter to every American for a very long time.

So I hope folks will remember what terrorists did to innocent Americans at a San Bernardino office gathering and why the FBI simply must do all we can under the law to investigate that.  And in that sober spirit, I also hope all Americans will participate in the long conversation we must have about how to both embrace the technology we love and get the safety we need.

FBI Director Comey: New iPhone Encryption Shields Criminals from Investigators

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Apple’s privacy features on the new iPhone and iPad protect pedophiles, terrorists and other criminals because investigators can’t access the information, FBI Director James Comey said.

The new encryption scrambles information as it travels through Apple services.

Comey isn’t happy about that.

“The notion that people have devices… that with court orders, based on a showing of probable cause in a case involving kidnapping or child exploitation or terrorism, we could never open that phone? My sense is that we’ve gone too far when we’ve gone there,” Comey said in an interview on CBS’ “60 Minutes.”

Comey compared the iPhones to “cars with trunks that couldn’t ever be opened by law enforcement with a court order.”

Utah Man Accused of Threatening to Blow Up FBI Office After Making 112 Calls

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A Utah man really wanted the FBI’s attention.

Robert Zickella, 49, is accused of calling the FBI in St. George at least 112 times over several days, threatening agents and threatening to blow up the bureau’s office, the Salt Lake Tribune reports.

Zickella is being held in the Purgatory Correctional Facility on a $10,000 bond

What remains unclear is why Zickella threatened the FBI and hounded agents.

Like Plot out of “24”, FBI Agent Says Suspected Teen Terrorist Made Video and Researched Detonating Bomb With Cell Phone

dallas-map1By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Down in Dallas, the story behind the Jordanian teenager who wanted to blow up a skyscraper is beginning to sound more and more like a plot out of the popular Fox Tv show “24”.

The Dallas Morning News reports that an FBI agent testified that the teen had researched how to detonate a bomb with a cell phone and made a 7-minute video, which he thought would end up in the hands of Osama bin Laden.

To read more about this wild plot, click here.