Links

Columnists



Site Search


Entire (RSS)
Comments (RSS)

Archive Calendar

September 2021
S M T W T F S
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
2627282930  

Guides

How to Become a Bounty Hunter



Tag: Pakistan

Report Finds 9/11 Plotter Khalid Sheik Mohammed Killed Journal Reporter Daniel Pearl

Daniel Pearl/daniel pearl foundation photo

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

WASHINGTON — A new report concludes that Khalid Sheik Mohammed, the self-described mastermind of the 9/11 attack, killed abducted Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl in Pakistan nine years ago, the Wall Street Journal reported.

The paper reported that Asra Q. Nomani, a former Journal reporter who was friends with Pearl, led an investigation into the murder with Georgetown University faculty and students.

The “Pearl Report” found that U.S. officials, using vascular technology or vein matching,  concluded that the hands in the high-profile video killing belonged to Mohammed, the Journal reported.

Mohammed had confessed to the killing during a military hearing in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba in 2007, where he is currently being held and awaiting trial in the 9/11 attack. But at the time it wasn’t clear if it was self promotion or the truth.

Khalid Sheik Mohammad

Pearl was abducted Jan. 23, 2002. He was duped into thinking he was going to an interview someone as part of his investigation into ties between a radical Pakistani cleric and shoe bomber Richard Reid.

Mohammed told U.S. investigators that he was not originally involved in the abduction, but was later pulled in by another senior al Qaeda operative, the Journal reported.

Read report.

FBI Ended DC Subway Sting Before Suspect Could Flee U.S.

By Allan Lengel
For AOL News

WASHINGTON — The FBI decided to end its sting and arrest a Northern Virginia man now charged with plotting to blow up D.C. -area subway stations because it was concerned he was about to leave the country to go on pilgrimage to Saudi Arabia, according to a court document and law enforcement sources.

FBI agents arrested Farooque Ahmed, 34, of Ashburn, Va., on Wednesday on charges that he conspired with people he thought were al-Qaida operatives to blow up the Arlington National Cemetery, Pentagon City, Crystal City and Court House subway stations in Northern Virginia.

In some other cases involving stings, the FBI let the plot play out more. In Dallas, for example, FBI agents in 2009 actually provided fake explosives to Hosam Smadi, who drove a car bomb to a skyscraper downtown and tried detonating it.

In September 2009, FBI agents posing as low-level al-Qaida operatives provided Michael C. Finton — aka Talib Islam — with fake explosives in a van that he allegedly tried detonating in front of the Paul Findley Federal Building in Springfield, Ill.

In this latest case, Ahmed, a naturalized U.S. citizen from Pakistan, met with undercover FBI agents and FBI operatives over the past several months and provided video and diagrams of subway stops and conducted surveillance, authorities said. He also advised when the best time was to kill the maximum people, but never came close to carrying out the plot, investigators said.

To read more click here.

Read FBI affidavit

Feds Charge Hawaiian Man With Lying About Trying to Join Taliban

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

The feds have arrested a Hawaiian man who traveled to Pakistan, hoping to join the Taliban or a similar group, the Associated Press reported.

Abdel Hameed Shehadeh, 21, a U.S. citizen, who was arrested Friday in Honolulu, was charged with making false statements relating to international terrorism, AP reported. The criminal complaint was unsealed Monday in New York.

Authorities say Shehadeh was living on Staten Island in New York in early 2008 when he made a plan to join the Taliban or a similar group in Pakistan.

Shehadeh actually flew from John F. Kennedy International Airport to Islamabad, Pakistan, on June 13, 2008, but was denied entry an returned to the U.S., AP reported. He originally told  FBI agents and New York police detectives that he traveled to Pakistan to visit an Islamic university and attend a friend’s wedding, but later confessed to his true purpose.

He also allegedly tried to recruit others, authorities allege, according to AP.

Leader of Pakistan Taliban Charged in Death of 7 CIA Employees in Afghanistan

afghanistan mapBy Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

WASHINGTON — U.S. officials launched a multi-prong attack against the Pakistan Taliban, placing the group on the international terrorism black list while indicting its leader in the death of seven CIA employees last year on a U.S. military base in Afghanistan.

The State Department also announced that it was offering a $5 million reward each for information leading to the capture of two top leaders.

One of those leaders,  Hakimullah Mehsud, the self-proclaimed emir of the Pakistani Taliban, was charged in a criminal complaint announced Wednesday  in Washington in connection with the Dec. 30, 2009 suicide bombing that killed the seven CIA employees.

Read more »

5 Northern Virginia Men Convicted of Terrorism in Pakistan

pakistan-map
By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Five  Northern Virginia men who vanished, only to appear in Pakistan, were sentenced to 10 years in prison after being convicted of terrorism charges Thursday by a Pakistani court, the Washington Post reported.

Pakistani authorities introduced evidence including emails, which it said showed the young men planned to carry out terrorist attacks in Pakistan, the Post reported.

The attorneys for the men questioned the verdict and the legitimacy of the emails. The Post reported that the families back home were devastated by the verdicts.

To Read more click here.

U.S. Pressuring Pakistan For More Info About Its Airline Travelers

pakistan-mapBy Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

WASHINGTON — One month after authorities captured the N.Y. car bomber — who talked of links to Pakistan — the U.S. is pressuring that nation to share more info about the travel history of its airline passengers, the New York Times is reporting.

Up until now, Pakistan has been resistant to give more information about travelers, citing an intrusion of privacy, the Times reported.

But the U.S feels it could benefit from more information about the travels of those coming from Pakistan to help detect travel patterns of terrorists and their supporters. Time will tell if the pressure works.

“Terrorists are enemies of both Pakistan and the United States, who need to discuss how to enhance cooperation and that is what we are doing,” Husain Haqqani, Pakistan’s ambassador to the United States, said in a text message to the Times on Sunday. “Pressuring an ally is not the way forward, and both sides understand that.”

To read more click here.

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST

Pakistani Ambassador Says 3 Men in NY Bomb Case Not Terrorists

Ambassador Husain Haqqani/embassy photo

Ambassador Husain Haqqani/embassy photo

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

WASHINGTON — The three Pakistani men rounded up last week as part of the ongoing probe into the New York car bomb incident don’t appear to have links to terrorism, the Pakistani Ambassador to the U.S. told the Boston Globe.

Ambassador Husain Haqqani of Washington, whose statement was based on briefings from Pakistani officials, said it appears the men were taken into custody during questioning because of immigration violations, the Globe reported.

“For all we know, there will be no connection at the end of it,” Haqqani told the Globe in a telephone interview. “I’m a little critical of law enforcement who ran to the press first, because you can actually destroy people’s lives. So far, there is nothing that implies anything of a terrorist nature.”

After the FBI raids in three different states last week, authorities said the men may have provided money to the suspected car bomber Faisal Shahzad, but it was unclear if they knew what he was up to.

The Globe reported that the FBI and U.S. Attorney’s Offices in New York and Boston declined comment.

To read more click here.

The Roots of Discontent for The NY Car Bomber Faisal Shahzad

Stories like this may provide some insight into the latest attempted terrorist attack involving Faisal Shahzad, a man came from a well-to-do family in Pakistan,who was making a life as an American, but became increasingly angry at the U.S. and its policies.

Faisal Shahzad/cnn

Faisal Shahzad/cnn

By Andrea Elliott, Sabrina Tavernise and Anne Barnard
New York Times

Just after midnight on Feb. 25, 2006, Faisal Shahzad sent a lengthy e-mail message to a group of friends. The trials of his fellow Muslims weighed on him — the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the plight of Palestinians, the publication in Denmark of cartoons lampooning the Prophet Muhammad.

Mr. Shahzad was wrestling with how to respond. He understood the notion that Islam forbids the killing of innocents, he wrote. But to those who insist only on “peaceful protest,” he posed a question: “Can you tell me a way to save the oppressed? And a way to fight back when rockets are fired at us and Muslim blood flows?

“Everyone knows how the Muslim country bows down to pressure from west. Everyone knows the kind of humiliation we are faced with around the globe.”

Yet by some measures, Mr. Shahzad — a Pakistani immigrant who was then 26 years old — seemed to be thriving in the West.

To read full story click here.