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Tag: online

FBI Says Online Fraud Doubled in 2009 to $559.7 Million

pirate-cyber-theft
By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

WASHINGTON — Fraudulent crime on the Internet doubled in dollar value in 2009 compared to the year before, according to a report by the Crime Complaint Center, a partnership between the FBI and the National White Collar Crime Center.

The report released Friday by the FBI showed that the total loss resulting from online fraud amounted to $559.7 million last year compared to $265 million in 2008.

The report said the number one fraud involved advance fee schemes using the FBI’s name. That accounted for 16.6 percent of the scams. The second most reported offense involved non-delivery or merchandise or failing to make a payment.

“Law enforcement relies on the corporate sector and citizens to report when they encounter on-line suspicious activity so these schemes can be investigated and criminals can be arrested,” Peter Trahon, section chief of the FBI’s Cyber Division said in a statement. “Computer users are encouraged to have up-to-date security protection on their devices and evaluate e-mail solicitations they receive with a healthy skepticism—if something seems too good to be true, it likely is.”

Donald Brackman, director of the White Collar Crime Center  said criminals are “developing increasingly sophisticated means of defrauding unsuspecting consumers. Internet crime is evolving in ways we couldn’t have imagined just five years ago.”

To Read the full report click here.

Oooops! Transportation Security Administration Accidentally Reveals Airport Security Secrets

It’s never a good thing when an agency which is part of the Department of Homeland Security — emphasis on Security — makes such a goof. Someone needs to pay closer attention.

oops-art

By Spencer S. Hsu and Carrie Johnson
Washington Post Staff Writer

WASHINGTON — The Transportation Security Administration inadvertently revealed closely guarded secrets related to airport passenger screening practices when it posted online this spring a document as part of a contract solicitation, the agency confirmed Tuesday.

The 93-page TSA operating manual details procedures for screening passengers and checked baggage, such as technical settings used by X-ray machines and explosives detectors. It also includes pictures of credentials used by members of Congress, CIA employees and federal air marshals, and it identifies 12 countries whose passport holders are automatically subjected to added scrutiny.

TSA officials said that the manual was posted online in a redacted form on a federal procurement Web site, but that the digital redactions were inadequate. They allowed computer users to recover blacked-out passages by copying and pasting them into a new document or an e-mail.

For Full Story

Online Data Sharing Leads to Disclosure of Sensitive Govt and Personal Info

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Now this is pretty darn scary. Rep. Edolphus Towns says he plans to introduce legislation to ban such software. Whether or not that’s the answer, is another question. But someone needs to find the answer. It seems a more effective way would be to create a software that prevents this from happening. Banning software seems like a tough task.

By Brian Krebs and Ellen Nakashima
Washington Post Staff Writers
WASHINGTON — The indiscriminate use of a popular online data-sharing technology has led to the disclosure of sensitive government and personal information — including FBI surveillance photos of a Mafia hit man, lists of people with HIV, and motorcade routes and safe-house locations for then-first lady Laura Bush, a congressional panel was told on Wednesday.

The information is often exposed inadvertently by people who download the technology to share music or other files, not realizing that the “peer-to-peer” software also makes the contents of their computers available to other users, experts said.

For Full Story

FBI Going Online to Catch Bank Robbers

It’s good to see  the Internet being used to crack crimes.  We’ve seen it used too often to commit crimes.  

BY ADAM WALLWORTH
ARKANSAS DEMOCRAT-GAZETTE

FBI agents are going online to catch bank robbers.

In the past six months, four bank robberies have been solved with the assistance of www.bandittrackerarkansas.comWanted Ark. Bank Robber, said Steven Burroughs, supervisory special agent for the FBI in Little Rock.

“Just with those few numbers, that’s a valuable thing,” he said about the site launched in 2008.

The site features security camera photos and details of robberies throughout the state. A barrage of five highpriority suspects graces the top of the page and is updated as heists occur.

For Full Story