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Tag: online

DOJ Creates Online Tool to Make It Easier to Report Civil Rights Violations

By Steve Neavling

ticklethewire.com

The Justice Department has created a new online tool for the public to report a civil rights violation.

The Civil Rights Reporting Portal is designed to make it easier for victims of civil rights violation to launch a complaint.

“The department is committed to upholding the civil and constitutional rights of all people in the United States,” Assistant Attorney General Eric Dreiband of the Civil Rights Division says in a news release. “The Civil Rights Reporting Portal will make it easier for the public to connect with us, which in turn makes us more effective at upholding these important rights. I encourage the public to use this portal to report civil rights violations.”

The Civil Rights Division enforces federal laws that forbid discrimination based on race, national origin, disability, gender, religion, familial status, or loss of other constitutional rights.

People who suspect they are the victim of a criminal civil rights violation, such as a hate crime or police misconduct, are encouraged to contact their local FBI office.

DEA Agent Sentenced to 6.5 Years for Stealing Digital Currency from Drug Site Silk Road

250px-Silk_Road_LogoBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A DEA agent who stole more than $700,000 in digital currency from online drug dealer Silk Road was sentenced Monday to 6.5 years in prison for extortion and other charges, the Associated Press reports. 

DEA Agent Carl M. Force, 46, went undercover as a drug dealer with ties to hit men.

Silk Road operator Ross Ulbricht was recently sentenced to life in prison.

Force was accused of selling information about the investigation.

Other Stories of Interest

Bill Would Give FBI More Resources to Fight Online Harassment

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The U.S. House of Representatives is considering a bill that would give the FBI more  resources to tackle cybercrime, especially online harassment, the Washington Post reports.

The bill by Rep. Katherine Clark, D-Mass., would give the FBI 10 new agents whose sole jobs would be tackling threats made online. They would investigate stalkers and people who threaten violence.

Clark said online threats are increasing to alarming rates.

“While these threats may occur on the Internet, their impacts are far from virtual,” Clark told The Post. “They affect the bottom line for victims, who pay a real cost not just emotionally but also financially —  in fees to attorneys and private investigators, or to services to scrub personally identifying information from the Web. I don’t think that women, who are the primary targets of this kind of abuse, should have to do this alone.”

Feds Investigate Online Posting of Personal Information about U.S. Military Members

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Federal investigators are trying to determine whether an Islamic group illegally obtained personal information of 100 U.S. military members  before posting it publicly.

A group called the Islamic Hacking Division posted the information online, urging its “brothers residing in America” to attack, The USA Today reports.

One investigator said it appears so far that the information was culled from social media sites, which has prompted the Army last month to rewrite its social media guidelines.

Now questions are being raised about changing the guidelines for officials in the Justice Department and FBI, The USA Today wrote.

Top Assistant New Orleans U.S. Attorney Retires Amid Controversy

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

 Jan Mann, the first Assistant U.S. Attorney in the New Orelans office, who was embroiled in controversy, has retired from the office, along with her husband, the New Orleans Times-Picayune reports.

Gordon Russell of the Times-Picayune reports:

 Jan Mann was demoted from her dual management posts last month — she had been both first assistant U.S. attorney and chief of the office’s criminal division — after she admitted commenting pseudonymously on stories about federal cases posted at NOLA.com.

The revelation came more than six months after Sal Perricone, another high-ranking member of the office, confessed to authoring a raft of online rants.

The scandal resulted in the resignation of U.S. Attorney Letten.

To read more click here.

FBI: More Than 300,000 Could Lose Web Access in July

By CNN

In the wake of a multi-million-dollar online scam, more than 300,000 computer users worldwide could find themselves without Web access this summer.

Luckily for them, it will only take a few clicks to clean things up.

The FBI announced that it’s created a website where users can check whether they’re infected with malware and remove it if they are. Check your computer here — http://www.dcwg.org. The site was at times difficult to access on Monday, presumably due to heavy traffic.

To read more click here.

 

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST

 

Justice Dept. Gives the Nod to Online Gambling

istock photo/ticklethewire.com

By KAJA WHITEHOUSE
New York Post

NEW YORK — The Obama administration just gave Donald Trump and other casino titans a big, wet Christmas kiss.

In a stunning decision, the Justice Department has removed a major hurdle that kept states from legalizing online gambling, by maintaining that a key federal law applies to sports betting but not casino games.

In a letter to some lawmakers, released Dec. 23, DOJ officials said they’d changed their long-held stance against interstate online gambling to prohibit only “bets or wagers relating to sporting events or contests.”

“In my view, 2012 is going to be known as the year the online gambling industry in the United States is going to be born,” said Richard Bronson, chairman of US Digital Gaming, which plans to service the US online gaming industry once it gets going.

To read more click here.

Google Pays Justice Dept. $500,000 for Running Canadian Pharmacy Ads

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Google, the 800-pound gorilla in the cyber world, is going to to be a little lighter in the pocket as a result of some wrongdoing.

Google has agreed to forfeit to the Justice Department $500 million for allowing online Canadian pharmacies to illegaly pedal prescription drugs, authorities announced Wednesday.

The Justice Department said the pharmacies placed ads through Google’s AdWords program and targeted U.S. consumers, resulting in the unlawful importation of controlled and non-controlled prescription drugs into the U.S.

The Justice Department noted that shipment of prescription drugs from pharmacies outside the United States to customers in the United States typically violates the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act and in the case of controlled prescription drugs , the Controlled Substances Act. Authorities say they cannot assure the safety of drugs outside of the U.S.

Authorities said Google was aware as early as 2003, that generally, it was illegal for pharmacies to ship controlled and non-controlled prescription drugs into the United States from Canada.

“This investigation is about the patently unsafe, unlawful, importation of prescription drugs by Canadian on-line pharmacies, with Google’s knowledge and assistance, into the United States, directly to U.S. consumers,” said Rhode Island U.S. Attorney Peter F. Neronha.

“It is about taking a significant step forward in limiting the ability of rogue on-line pharmacies from reaching U.S. consumers, by compelling Google to change its behavior. It is about holding Google responsible for its conduct by imposing a $500 million forfeiture, the kind of forfeiture that will not only get Google’s attention, but the attention of all those who contribute to America’s pill problem.”

In a statement published in the Boston Globe, Google said:

“While we banned the advertising of prescription drugs in the US by Canadian pharmacies some time ago, it’s obvious with hindsight that we shouldn’t have allowed these ads on Google in the first place.”