Links

Columnists



Site Search


Entire (RSS)
Comments (RSS)

Archive Calendar

September 2021
S M T W T F S
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
2627282930  

Guides

How to Become a Bounty Hunter



Tag: New Orleans

Fed Jury Convicts 3 New Orleans Cop in Case Involving Murder and Burning of Body


By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

A federal jury on Thursday convicted three New Orleans cops in the Post-Katrina fatal shooting of citizen Henry Glover and the burning of his body and the cover up, the Justice Department announced. Two other cops were acquitted.

The jury found former New Orleans cop David Warren was guilty of a civil rights violation, resulting in death, for the Sept. 2, 2005, shooting of civilian Henry Glover, as well as use of a firearm during a crime of manslaughter, the Justice Department said.

The jury heard evidence that Warren shot Glover in the back as Glover was running away from him behind the Algiers strip mall.

During trial, evidence showed that Glover’s brother and a friend flagged down a passing motorist, “Good Samaritan” William Tanner, who put the wounded Glover in his car to try to get medical attention.

But when the group of men drove up to a makeshift police station seeking help for Glover, police officers surrounded them at gunpoint, handcuffed them, and let Henry Glover die in the back seat of the car, the Justice Department said.

Officer Greg McRae drove off with Tanner’s car, with Glover’s body inside, and burned both the body and the car with traffic flare, the Justice Department said.

McRae was convicted on two counts of civil rights violations. Lt. Travis McCabe was convicted of obstructing justice by writing and submitting a false report about the shooting of Henry Glover. He was also convicted of lying to the FBI and committing perjury by lying to a federal grand jury.

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST

Senate Votes to Oust Fed Judge Thomas Porteous of New Orleans

Judge Thomas Porteous

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

As expected, Thomas Porteous of New Orleans is no longer a federal judge.

The U.S. Senate on Wednesday voted to convict him on all four articles of impeachment that included allegations that he corruptly accepted meals, trips and other gifts from a bail bondsman while serving as a state judge, lied about a bankruptcy filing and failed to disclose his corrupt behavior during the confirmation process for federal judge.

The vote strips him of his lifetime presidential appointment and his $174,000 annual pension, according to the New Orleans Times-Picayune. He was appointed by President Clinton in 1994.

“Today brought closure to the long controversy over my actions as a federal district judge,” he said after the vote, according to the Times-Picayune. “I am deeply saddened to be removed from office but I felt it was important not just to me but to the judiciary to take this fight to the Senate.

“I am deeply grateful to those senators who voted against the articles. While I still believe these allegations did not rise to the level of impeachable offenses as a constitutional matter, I understand how people of good-faith could disagree.

“I will now be returning to Louisiana and my family. My family has been a constant and vital source of support throughout this ordeal. I have previously apologized for the mistakes that I committed in this case. I never disputed many of the underlying facts and I previously accepted punishment in the Fifth Circuit. While I disagree with the decision of the Senate, I must now accept that judgment.”

To read more click here.

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST

Ex-New Orleans Cop Gets 8 Years For Role in Danziger Bridge Shootings of Civilians

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Former New Orleans cop Michael Hunter was sentenced to eight years in prison Wednesday for covering up and participating in the shootings on the infamous Danziger Bridge of unarmed citizens days after Katrina hit. Two civilians died and four were wounded.

In one of the more disgraceful chapters in the police department’s history, authorities said Hunter, 33, drove to the Danziger Bridge on Sept. 4, 2005, in a large Budget rental truck packed with officers responding to a radio call that said cops on the nearby I-10 bridge had come under fire.

The Justice Department said Hunter, who pleaded guilty in April, admitted that officers on the east side of the Danziger Bridge fired at civilians even though the civilians did not appear to have any weapons.

Hunter said one officer leaned over a concrete barrier, held out an assault rifle and, in a sweeping motion, fired repeatedly at the civilians, who were at that point lying wounded and apparently unarmed on the ground, according to the Justice Department press release.

Hunter also admitted firing his weapon repeatedly at civilians who were running away over the bridge. He admitted that he did not see the civilians carrying weapons and none appeared to pose a threat.

Hunter told authorities he was present when an officer shot and killed one of the citizens, Ronald Madison.

After the incident, Hunter admitted that he and other officers provided false statements about the incident.

Hunter, in a quivering voice, apologized to relatives in the courtroom, according to the New Orleans Times-Picayune.

U.S. District Court Judge Sarah Vance also offered condolences to the relatives of the victims and lambasted Hunter, the paper reported.

“It is hard to imagine a more profound breach of public trust than what happened here,” Vance told Hunter. She described the cover-up and coercion in the case as “appalling perversion” and shocking “savagery.”

Some Doing Better Than Others After Congressman Jefferson Scandal

William J. Jefferson

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

WASHINGTON — A little more than a year after being sentenced to 13 years in prison for bribery, ex-Rep. William Jefferson of money-in-the-freezer fame, remains free pending an appeal.

And while the former New Orleans Democratic Congressman remains free, nothing will reverse the mess that resulted from what “federal prosecutors called a web of shakedown schemes orchestrated by Jefferson”, Bruce Alpert of the New Orleans Times-Picayune reports.

Some are doing better than others, the paper reports.

Vernon Jackson, the CEO of iGate Inc., who pleaded guilty to bribing Jefferson to help promote his high tech company in Africa, had his 87-month sentence reduced to three years after testifying in the trial against Jefferson, the paper reported.

The paper reported that Jackson called his time in prison the “greatest years of my life” because it brought him closer to God. The paper reports that he is now devoting his life to being a pastor.

The paper reports that Atiku Abubakar, the former vice president of Nigeria who authorities never charged, but alleged had taken bribes from Jefferson, is running for president of Nigeria.

Others have not done so well.

To read more click here.

White House Nominates Andrew Traver to Head Up ATF

Andrew Traver/zerocancer.org photo

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

WASHINGTON — As expected, the White House gave the nod on Monday to Andrew Traver, a 23-year-veteran of ATF, as the nominee to head the agency.

Traver has headed the ATF Chicago field division since 2004. From 2001 to 2004, he served as an assistant special agent in charge of the San Francisco office and  supervised criminal enforcement offices in the cities of San Francisco, Oakland, and San Jose.

From 2000 to 2001, he served as the assistant special agent in charge of the New Orleans division and from 1998 to 2000 he was a criminal investigator in the Office of Inspection at ATF headquarters in Washington.

Before that, from 1993 to 1998, Traver worked as a group supervisor in the Philadelphia. He joined ATF in 1987 and first worked in the Chicago office.

Kenneth Melson, a former federal prosecutor, has been in charge of ATF on an interim basis.

Retired FBI Agent Lester Davis Dies at Age 94

fbi logo large
By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Retired FBI agent Lester G. Davis of Atlanta, who developed an impressive record for capturing bank robbers in the 1950s while working in New Orleans, died Saturday at age 94, according to an obituary in the  New Orleans Times-Picayune.

Lester’s career with the FBI spanned 32 years, starting in 1942. He retired in 1974, the obituary said.

In the late 1960’s he went off to work in Atlanta and he became a serious coin collector, the paper said.

Sen. Trial Underway to Impeach Louisiana Fed Judge

Judge Thomas Porteous

Judge Thomas Porteous

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

U.S. District Judge G. Thomas Porteous of Louisiana appears to be in big big trouble.

A U.S. Senate impeachment trial began Monday in Washington to try and oust the presidentially-appointed judge, who is 63.

Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., who heads five-member House team serving as prosecutors for the trial, said in his opening statement that Porteous, 63, has violated the public trust, the New Orleans Times-Picayune reported.

“It is the unanimous view of the House of Representatives that his conduct is not only wrong but so violative of the public trust that he cannot be allowed to remain on the bench without making a mockery of the court system.” Schiff told the Senate Impeachment Trial Committee. according to the New Orleans Times-Picayune.

To read more click here.

Attys for New Orleans Cops to Meet With Justice to Discuss Death Penalty Issue

new-orleans-map-istockBy Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Attorneys for four current and ex-cops charged in the civilian Post-Katrina shootings on the Danziger Bridge will try and dissuade the Justice Department from seeking the death penalty, the New Orleans Times-Picayune reported.

The paper reports that attorneys are scheduled to meet with Justice Department officials Tuesday to discuss the matter.

It’s highly unusual for the feds to seek the death penalty against cops. The paper reports the only former cop on death row right now is a New Orleans officer Len Davis, “who ran a drug-protection racket in the mid-1990s and ordered the murder of a woman who filed a complaint to his superiors.”

To read more click here.