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Tag: new haven

Brian C. Turner Named Assistant Director of the Operational Technology Division at FBI Headquarters

Brian C. Turner, via FBI

By Steve Neavling

ticklethewire.com

Brian C. Turner, who recently served as the special agent in charge of the New Haven Field Office in Connecticut, has been named assistant director of the Operational Technology Division at FBI headquarters in Washington D.C.

The Operational Technology Division “provides technology-based solutions to enable and enhance the FBI’s intelligence, national security, and law enforcement operations,” the FBI said in a news release announcing the appointment.

Turner joined the FBI in 2002 as a special agent. His first assignment was with the Philadelphia Field Office, where he investigated white-collar crimes and criminal enterprises and supported surveillance operations.

Turner was deployed to Iraq in 2008 to support “FBI operational priorities” in the region.

After returning to the U.S. later that year, Turner served with the Fly Team of the Counterterrorism Division at headquarters, where he routinely traveled to Africa as part of the division’s overseas mission to combat global terrorism.

In 2012, Turner transferred to the Tucson Resident Agency of the Phoenix Field Office, supervising a criminal enterprise squad that targeted Mexican drug cartels along the U.S. border. He later supervised the Tucson Joint Terrorism Task Force.

In January 2016, Turner was promoted to assistant special agent in charge of criminal and administrative programs in the Minneapolis Field Office. In 2017, he became section chief in the International Operations Division at headquarters, overseeing the FBI’s legal attaché operations in Europe, Eastern Europe, and Eurasia.

In 2018, FBI Director Christopher Wray named him SAC of the New Haven Field Office.

Before joining the FBI, Turner earned a bachelor’s degree from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point and served in the U.S. Army for about a decade. Turner also taught at West Point and earned a master’s degree from Long Island University.

FBI Rescues 16 Juveniles, More Than 50 Adults Forced into Prostitution for Super Bowl

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

FBI agents rescued 16 juveniles who were forced into prostitution for the Super Bowl in the New York City area, the Associated Press reports.

The children, who ranged in age from 13 to 17, were found in Newark, New York City and New Haven. 

At least one of the victims had spent two years with her pimp, the AP wrote.

Agents also rescued more than 50 adult women who also were forced into prostitution.

Big events like the Super Bowl are lucrative for people involved in the sex trade, the AP reported.

Conn. Fed Jury Votes to Put Drug Dealer to Death for Triple Murder


By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

For the first time since the federal death penalty was reinstated in 1988, a federal jury in Connecticut has voted to impose the death penalty.

A federal jury in New Haven, Conn. voted Wednesday to unanimously condemn drug dealer Azibo Aquart, 30, of Bridgeport, Conn. to death for murdering three Bridgeport residents on Aug. 24, 2005, the U.S. Attorney’s Office said.

He had been convicted of conspiring to commit murder in aid of racketeering and committing the racketeering murders of Johnson, Reid and Williams. He was also convicted of committing three counts of drug-related murder and one count of conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute 50 grams or more of cocaine base (“crack cocaine”).

Though the jury voted to put him death, an execution isn’t likely to happen any time soon.

Since the reinstatement of the federal death penalty in 1988, 68 federal defendants have been sentenced to death and three  have actually been executed, according to Death Penalty Information Center.

Wednesday’s decision prompted a comment from U.S. Attorney David B. Fein, who said: “We thank the jury for their diligent and attentive service over both the guilt and sentencing phases of this case.”

In May, after a month long trial, the jury convicted Aquart of murdering Tina Johnson, 43, James Reid, 40, and Basil Williams, 54.

Authorities said evidence during the trial showed that Aquart also known as “Azibo Smith,” “Azibo Siwatu Jahi Smith,” “D,” “Dreddy,” and “Jumbo,” was the founder and leader of a drug trafficking group that primarily sold crack cocaine out of an apartment building located in Bridgeport.

Authorities said Aquart and associates used violence to maintain control over the group’s drug distribution activities at the Charles Street Apartments.

In the summer of 2005, Aquart and his associates got into a drug dispute with Tina Johnson, a resident of 215 Charles Street, who sometimes sold smaller quantities of crack cocaine without Aquart’s approval, authorities said.

On the morning of Aug. 24, 2005, Aquart and others entered Johnson’s apartment, bound Johnson, her boyfriend James Reid and friend Basil Williams with duct tape, and brutally beat the victims to death with baseball bats.

Aquart and others then drilled the front door of the apartment shut from the inside.