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Tag: Murder

Colorado Fugitive Joins the FBI’s ‘Ten Most Wanted Fugitives’ list in Connection with Stabbing

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

Meet the FBI’s newest member of the FBI’s “Ten Most Wanted Fugitives” list.

His name is Edwin Ernesto Rivera Gracias, a 28-year-old man with ties to a violent international gang, ABC News reports.

Rivera Gracias is wanted in the stabbing death of Denver resident Richard Limon, whose half-naked body was found on Lookout Mountain in Colorado.

Gracias’ body was thrown from the side of a mountain road after being stabbed in the chest with a steak knife, ABC News reported.

The FBI is expected to announce Gracias’ addition to the “Ten Most Wanted Fugitives” list today.

Inside a Serial Killer’s Mind: FBI Releases Blood-Soaked Prose of Admitted Alaskan Serial Killer

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The FBI released blood-soaked, handwritten prose found beneath the body of an admitted serial killer in Alaska.

While the writings don’t shed more light on his crimes, they open a window into the mind of an obsessed murderer, CNN reports.

Israel Keyes, who killed himself in jail in December, said he killed at least eight people.

Some of the writings appear to allude to taking a life.

“Your wet lips were a promise of a secret unspoke,” Keyes wrote. “Nervous laugh it burst like a pulse of blood from your throat. There will be no more laughter here.”

 STORIES OF OTHER INTEREST

Stepfather of Slain FBI Informant Loses Temper During Murder Trial

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Johnny Davis showed flashes of anger as he recounted watching his stepson get shot in the head in Newark, N.J., in 2004, NorthJersey.com reports.

Davis’ stepson, Kemo Deshawn McCray, was an FBI informant when prosecutors say he was gunned down by an attorney who wanted to stop the man from testifying against a client, NewJersey.com wrote.

Davis delivered the testimony Wednesday at the murder and racketeering trial of the attorney, Paul W. Bergrin, who is representing himself.

At one point, Davis grew louder as he remembered looking back at his son when the gun went off.

“That’s when I saw my son with a (expletive) hole in his head,” Davis said.

The judge urged Davis to ease up, NorthJersey.com reported.

FBI Lists Most Significant Cases of 2012

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

From espionage to cyber hacking, the FBI has taken on a lot of significant cases in 2012.

The following list was posted by the FBI.

Insider trading: Charges against seven investment professionals were announced in New York in January alleging an insider trading scheme that netted nearly $62 million in illegal profits. Details

California gang takedown: A total of 119 defendants were charged in San Diego in January with federal racketeering conspiracy, drug trafficking violations, and federal firearm offenses in one of the largest single gang takedowns in FBI San Diego history. The target was the Mexican Mafia gang and its affiliates.Details

Economic espionage: In February, a federal grand jury in San Francisco charged five individuals and five companies with economic espionage and theft of trade secrets in connection with their roles in a long-running effort to obtain U.S. trade secrets for the benefit of companies controlled by the People’s Republic of China. Details

Cyber hackers charged: Several hackers in the U.S. and abroad were charged in New York in March with cyber crimes affecting over a million victims. Four principal members of the hacking groups Anonymous and LulzSec were among those indicted; another key member previously pled guilty to similar charges. Details

Anchorage man indicted for murder: In April, Israel Keyes was charged with the kidnapping and murder of an Anchorage barista. Keyes is believed to have committed multiple kidnappings and murders across the country between 2001 and March 2012. In December, after Keyes committed suicide in jail, the FBI requested the public’s help regarding his other victims. Details

Financial fraudster receives 110-year sentence: In June, Allen Stanford—the former chairman of Stanford International Bank—was sentenced in Houston to 110 years in prison for orchestrating a 20-year investment fraud scheme in which he misappropriated $7 billion to finance his personal businesses.Details

Nationwide sweep recovers child victims of prostitution: The FBI and its partners announced the results of Operation Cross Country, a three-day law enforcement action in June in which 79 child victims of prostitution were recovered and more than 100 pimps were arrested. Details

International cyber takedown: Also in June, a two-year FBI undercover cyber operation culminated in the arrest of 24 individuals in eight countries. The investigation focused on “carding” crimes—offenses in which the Internet is used to steal victims’ credit card and bank account information—and was credited with protecting over 400,000 potential cyber crime victims and preventing over $205 million in losses.Details

Health care fraud: In July, global health care company GlaxoSmithKline pled guilty to fraud allegations and failure to report safety data and agreed to pay $3 billion in what officials called the largest health care fraud settlement in U.S. history. Details

Russian military procurement network: In October, 11 members of a Russian military procurement network operating in the United States and Russia, as well as a Texas-based export company and a Russia-based procurement firm, were indicted in New York and charged with illegally exporting high-tech microelectronics from the U.S. to Russian military and intelligence agencies. Details

Suspected Serial Killer Photographed Victim’s Body for Ransom, Then Cut Her Up

Steve Neavling
Ticklethewire.xom 

A self-described serial killer who committed suicide in an Alaskan jail went on vacation for two weeks after he sexually assaulted an 18-year-old woman, strangled her and stored her body in a shed, the FBI revealed Tuesday in hopes that new information will help investigators find more victims, the Associated Press reports.

After returning from the cruise, the AP wrote, Israel Keyes photographed the body of Samantha Koenig as if she were still alive, cut up her body and tossed her remains in a frozen lake where Keyes cut a hole in the ice with a chain saw.

Keyes sent a photo of Koenig’s body to her family, demanding $30,000 to release the woman, the AP reported.

Keyes, 34, who was arrested after using the victim’s ATM, was awaiting trial for her murder in March.

Keyes said he killed seven other people across the country over the past decade.

Mexican Accused of Killing U.S. Border Patrol Agent in 2010 to Change Plea

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

A Mexican man accused of killing a U.S. Border Patrol agent during a 2010 exchange of fire near the Arizona-Mexico border is expected to change his plea today in federal court, the Associated Press reports.

Manuel Osorio-Arellanes had pleaded not guilty to murder, assaulting a federal officer and other charges in connection with the death of Border Patrol Agent Brian Terry.

Authorities said the firefight began when Osorio-Arellanes and four other men planned to rob marijuana smugglers.

Three of those men remain fugitives, the AP reported.

Man Won’t Receive Death Penalty for Killing DEA Informant

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Edison Burgos Montes escaped the death penalty but faces life in prison in the killing of an DEA informant, a Puerto Rican jury decided Thursday, the Associated Press reports.

Montes was convicted in August of killing his girlfriend, Madelyn Semidey Morales, in July 2005.

She was cooperating with a DEA probe against him, the AP reported.

Morales’ mother urged Montes to reveal where the daughter’s body is but to no avail.

A family member maintained Montes was innocent, according to the AP.

Family of Slain Border Patrol Agent Speaks About Frustrations

Brian Terry

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

The frustrated family of a Border Patrol agent killed nearly two years ago along the Arizona-Mexico border said they want the truth about what happened, Fox 10 News reports.

“If the truth comes out and they tell me the truth, I’ll be happy with that, but I don’t want to just sit there and listen to lies just to cover up and pacify me,” a relative told Fox.

The murder of Brian Terry, which made infamous the controversial drug-running operation known as Fast and Furious, remains under investigation.