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Tag: Murder

Mexican Cartel Leader Convicted of Torture, Murder of DEA Agent Could Soon Be Released

dea-badgeBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A Mexican cartel leader convicted of the 1985 torture and murder of DEA Agent Enrique “Kiki” Camarena Salazar could soon be released from prison in Mexico, Fox News reports.

Ernesto “Don Neto” Fonseca Carrillo, 85, who was one of the leaders of the Guadalajara Cartel has served 30 years of a 40-year sentence.

Fonseca Carillo is eligible for house arrest.

The government is considering a proposal by defense attorneys to move Fonseca Carillo to a house, which would be guarded.

Man Charged in Border Patrol Agent’s Death Agrees to Plead Guilty As Part of Sentencing Deal

Brian Terry

Brian Terry

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A man charged in the death of a Border Patrol agent won’t face the death penalty as part of a plea agreement with prosecutors, The Arizona Daily Star reports. 

Rosario Burboa-Alvarez agreed to plead guilty Monday in the first-degree murder of Border Patrol Agent Brian Terry.

The sentencing recommendation calls for 30 years in prison with credit for time served.

Sentencing is scheduled for Oct. 19.

Prosecutors said Burboa-Alvarez was in charge of recruiting people to sneak across the U.S. border and rob marijuana smugglers.

Burboa-Alvarez, 31, was considered a co-conspirator, even though he was in Mexico at the time of the killing.

“Mr. Burboa-Alvarez is extremely remorseful for his role in the conspiracy and accepts responsibility for his actions,” his court-appointed attorney Benjamin Aguilera said Tuesday. He “has obviously undergone much reflection and feels nothing but anguish and sorrow for what transpired in December 2010. Without question, the tragedy of Agent Terry’s death is something everyone wishes could be undone.”

Family of Dead Former Cop Drops Lawsuit over Alleged FBI Framing

fbi badgeBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A trial in federal court ended abruptly Wednesday after a family suing an FBI agent for allegedly framing the late,  ex-cop Gary Engel in a 1984 kidnapping plot,   dropped the lawsuit.

The son of Engel dismissed the suit against retired FBI Agent Robert Buchan on what would have been the third day of the civil trial, the Chicago Tribune reports. 

The decision to drop the suit came after lawyers for the agent said that Engel’s brother was willing to sign an affidavit, saying he had implicated his sibling in the kidnapping.

The brother, Rick, said Engel came home from a trip to Missouri in 1984 and made the admission.

The family, however, reached a $3 million settlement this week with the village of Buffalo Grove, which also was a defendant in the suit. An attorney for the family said the suit was “sufficient justice.”

Engel was sentenced to 90 years for the 1984 case and served 20 years before he was released after it came to light that a key witness against him, Missouri mobster Anthony Mammolito, had been paid $500 by Buffalo Grove police.

The Tribune reported that Engel’s lawsuit against the FBI was pending in October 2012 when he was arrested as part of a plot to kidnap a suburban businessman.

A few days after that arrest, Engel was found hanged in his jail cell.

 

Homeland Security Employee, 2 Family Members Murdered in ‘Witchcraft’ Killing

Blue Moon/Wikipedia

Blue Moon/Wikipedia

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Three family members in Florida, including a Homeland Security employee, were beaten with a claw hammer and their throats were slit in a triple murder that appears to be tied to “witchcraft” and the blue moon, The Washington Post reports. 

Law enforcement said the gruesome attack near Pensacola, Fla., was being investigated as a “ritualistic killing.” Killed were Voncile Smith, 77, and her sons John William Smith, 49; and Richard Thomas Smith, 47, a Homeland Security employee who also was shot in the head.

“The elements of this case are odd, at best,” Escambia County Sheriff David Morgan said at a news conference, as Reuters reported. “We have a very reclusive family. Obviously we’ve canvassed the neighborhood, spoken to people who’ve lived there for years and years. Neighbors have related to us that they’ve never met members of this family.”

Police said they have an person of interest “with ties to witchcraft.”

“Initial research has led us to believe it was a ritualistic killing,” Morgan also said, as the Pensacola News Journal reported. “The method of the murder — blunt force trauma, slit throats, positioning of bodies — and our person of interest has some ties to a faith or religion that is indicative of that. The time of the death on Tuesday also coincides with what’s referred to as a blue moon, which occurs every three years.”

Border Patrol Reportedly Ordered Release of Immigrant Who Later Murdered Woman

Juan Emmanuel Razo

Juan Emmanuel Razo

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Border Patrol officials are accused of ordering sheriff’s deputies in Ohio to release an undocumented immigrant who then murdered a 60-year-old woman, tried to kill another woman and attempted to rape a teenage girl, the Daily Caller reports. 

Juan Razo, 35, has been charged in the murder Monday of Margaret Kastelnick.

His crime spree allegedly began Monday morning with the attempted rape of a 14-year-old girl, followed by shooting another woman. The spree ended in the murder of Kastelnick at her home.

Razo, who has been in the U.S. for five years, was arrested following a shootout with police.

“Emmanuel Razo was secured while we spoke with Officer Rivera of U.S. Border Patrol, who later decided not to respond to take Emmanuel Razo into custody,” a Lake County sheriff’s deputy wrote in his report, according to WKYC. “[Razo] was warned not to return to this property. We cleared.”

Feds Nab Dozens of Crips in New Jersey; 1 Charged with Plotting to Kill FBI Agent

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Members of a violent criminal street gang in New Jersey were arrested after federal authorities said at least one of them was plotting to murder an FBI plot, WABC reports.

A state, local and federal investigation culminated in the arrests of 71 people allegedly connected to the Grape Street Crips gang. The charges range from drug distribution to weapons offenses.

Authorities said one of the gang members, Corey Batts, plotted to kill an FBI agent while behind bars. He captured photos of the agent from the prison library and sent them to his “cousin,” but prison officials intercepted.

“As this investigation demonstrates, the New Jersey Grape Street Crips are allegedly one of the largest and most dangerous street gangs in Newark as well as a prolific narcotics trafficking organization that floods the streets New Jersey with heroin, cocaine, and crack cocaine,” U.S. Attorney Paul Fishman said. “The narcotics activities that the gang and its associates allegedly engage in directly affect the quality of life of law-abiding citizens who reside in cities and suburbs of northern New Jersey.”

Weekend Series on Crime: Murder Inc. Mobsters

Why South Carolina Cop Got Caught Killing Unarmed Walter Scott

Michael Slager

By Scott Lemieux
The Week

He probably would have gotten away with it.

That’s the sobering reality of the video of South Carolina police officer Michael Slager shooting Walter L. Scott as he ran away, not posing the slightest threat to the officer. The utter indifference to human life evident in the video, shot by Feidin Santana, is horrifying. As Scott’s father put it, “The way he was shooting that gun, it looked like he was trying to kill a deer.” After Scott was felled by at least one of eight shots, Slager occupied himself with handcuffing Scott and possibly trying to plant evidence rather than making any immediateattempt to save his life. The phrase “cold-blooded killing” could have been invented for this shooting.

After the video surfaced, the relevant local authorities, to their credit, actedpromptly and justly. Slager was fired by the police department and charged with Scott’s murder by the district attorney. The killing was denounced by South Carolina’s Republican governor and its two Republican senators. In this case, clear video evidence pierced the thin blue line.

And yet, if it wasn’t for the pure chance of Slager’s actions being videotaped, he probably would have gotten off scot-free. Without videotaped evidence, stories of officers fearing for their lives before using deadly force can be difficult to dispute, and local police departments have little incentive to conduct extensive, critical investigations of the self-justifications of officers who kill. Even worse, they do have incentives to cover up even the most serious police misconduct.

“Americans are bombarded with evidence that police officers who use excessive or fatal force will go to great lengths to protect themselves and make sure they face no legal repercussions,” says Heather Ann Thompson, a professor of history at Temple University who specializes in issues of criminal justice. “From the state police’s bloody retaking of Attica in 1971, to the recent police officer killing of a citizen in South Carolina, cover-up is the first line of defense.”

This tendency to cover up represents a very serious systematic problem. A great deal of the criminal justice system depends on the honesty of law enforcement officials. Many criminal prosecutions depend on police testimony, and we often must rely on the investigations of local police when potential cases of misconduct arise. Pervasive dishonesty both lets individual bad actors escape punishment and undermines essential law enforcement activities.