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Tag: Miami

Too Much Evidence Prompts Dismissal of Prescription Drug Case

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Is it possible to have too much evidence against someone?

It appears so after a federal judge in Iowa dropped a case involving the nation’s largest prosecution of Internet pharmacies, the Associated Press reports.

The evidence against former Miami doctor, Armando Angulo, included more than 400,000 documents and two terabytes of electronic data, taking up 5% of the DEA’s worldwide electronic storage, according to Newsday.

Angulo fled to his native Panama, which does not extradite its own citizens. So given that he’s never likely to come back to the U.S., and the issue of maintaining all the documents, the prosecutors asked the to dismiss the case so the evidence can be deleted or destroyed, AP reported.

 

 

Fla. Cop Gets Three Years for Targeting, Stealing From Hispanic Drivers

By Danny Fenster
ticklethewire.com

Racial profiling might seem lucrative, but the cost of doing business will eventually catch up.

A Florida police officer who was arrested for stealing cash from Hispanics he pulled over was sentenced to three years in prison on Tuesday, reports the Miami Herald.

Mark Ott’s sentence comes eight months after a joint undercover sting between the FBI and local law enforcement agencies caught him illegally confiscating between $35 and $400 from Hispanic men he had pulled over between February and May of last year, the Herald reported.

Ott targeted most of the men after the left local check cashing stores, prosecutors had found. In May Ott stopped an undercover sheriff’s deputy and an FBI agent posing as a driver and a passenger, confiscating the driver’s wallet and swiping $150 of $400 of photocopied bills in the wallet, according to the Herald.

The sentence was part of a plea deal in which Ott plead guilty to five felony charges of evidencing prejudice while committing robbery. Ott will also repay $1,780 to victims as part of the deal.

To read more click here.

 

Appeals Court Says Dirty Bomber’s 17-Year Sentence Too Light

Jose Padilla

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

The man known as the “dirty bomber”, Jose Padilla, got too soft of a sentence, the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled Monday.

The Associated Press reports that the appeals court vacated the 17-year sentence and ordered a new sentencing.

Padilla, a Muslim convert, was convicted in 2007 along with two co-conspirators of several terrorism-related charges.

The ruling affirmed the convictions of Padilla, Adham Hassoun and Kifah Jayyousi on terrorism support and conspiracy charges, AP reported.

Padilla was held as an enemy combatant for three years before he was prosecuted in Miami. He was first arrested in 2002 in the dirty bomb investigation.

 

 

Coke Kingpin Charged in Miami; Considered Among Colombia’s Most Wanted

By Danny Fenster
ticklethewire.com

The feds in Miami are taking aim at some big guys in the drug world.

Authorities filed charges against  Daniel Barrera-Barrera, an international drug smuggler with alleged ties to terrorist groups in Columbia, reports the Miami Herald.

The report calls Barrera-Barrera, 42, one of Columbia’s most-wanted, and says he “maintains a partnership with the U.S.-designated terrorist group known as the FARC,” a leftist guerrilla group.

Barrera-Barrera, also know as “Loco Barrara,” remains at large. He was charged in Miami along with two brothers, Javier Fernandez-Barrero, 43, and Orlando Fernandez-Barrero, 45, also known as “Los Gorditos.” The brothers are in custody.

The family’s “criminal enterprise is responsible for distributing tons of cocaine into the U.S and other countries,” said FBI Special Agent in Charge John Gillies, according to the Herald.

To read more click here.


FBI Commemorates Deadly 1986 Shootout That Killed 2 Agents and Wounded 5 Others

FBI Dir. Robert Mueller/fbi file photo

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

FBI Director Robert S. Mueller III and former director William Webster were among several hundred law enforcement folks who gathered in North Miami Beach Monday to commemorate the 25th anniversary of one of the most horrific events in the agency’s history that ended with two agents dead and another five wounded, the Associated Press reported.

The incident happened in Miami when William Webster headed up the FBI, and resulted in the agency using more powerful weapons and taking other action to better prepare agents for potentially deadly confrontations, AP reported. Agents Benjamin P. Grogan and Jerry Dove were killed.

Others attending the ceremony included  retired agent John F. Hanlon Jr. who was wounded in the incident, AP reported.

“I’m very, very proud of what we did that day. We all did our duty. And we did the best we could,” Hanlon said, according to the AP. “They laid down their lives gallantly for their country.”

On April 11, 1986, the FBI agents tracked down two bank robbers who were responsible for shooting several guards. They forced the robbers in a car  to pull over.

The robbers opened fire with a shotgun and a .223-cal. Ruger Mini-14 rifle, “which packed more power and carried more ammunition than anything the agents had,” AP reported. “Some had semiautomatic handguns and one had a 12-gauge shotgun, but many only were armed only with difficult-to-reload revolvers. Only two wore body armor, and even that wasn’t strong enough to stop the rifle’s rounds.”

Five other agents were shot and wounded including Edmundo Mireles Jr., who shot and killed both suspects, AP reported.

Mueller described the shootout as “one of the most difficult and dangerous days in the history of the bureau,” AP reported.

Since 1925, 36 FBI agents have been killed in the line of duty, AP reported.

Appeals Court Uphold Murder Conviction of Ex-Bost FBI Agent John Connolly

John Connolly

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Rogue Boston FBI agent John Connolly, who was faulted for getting too close to his mob informants, will remain behind bars.

The Miami Herald reports that the Florida Third District of Appeal on Wednesday upheld his 2008 conviction in the murder of Miami Jai-Alai executive John Callahan in 1982. He  was found in a trunk at the Miami International Airport.

Connolly, 70, was convicted by a Miami-Dade jury of second-degree murder for leaking sensitive information about Callahan to Boston mobsters and FBI informants James “Whitey” Bulger and Stephen “The Rifleman” Flemmi, the Herald reported. After getting the information, authorities allege that the two then put a hit out on Callahan. Flemmi is behind bars and Bulger remains a fugitive. Connolly was sentenced to  40 years.

“They are going to put me in prison for the rest of my life for a crime I had nothing to do with,” Connolly told the Associated Press in phone interview from prison. “How is this justice? How is this possible? They got what they want.”

“We’re very delighted with the decision,” Miami-Dade State Attorney Katherine Fernandez Rundle said Wednesday night, according to the Miami Herald. “He was an FBI agent. He had all the power. He had guns. He had information. And he betrayed all that and people died.”

Fla. Court of Appeals Will Hear Appeal of Ex-FBI Agent John Connolly on Murder Conviction

John Connolly-wbz-tv

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Ex-Boston FBI agent John Connolly, who authorities say stepped way over the line in his relationship with the mob, is appealing his 2008 second-degree murder conviction in the 1982 mob-related slaying of a gambling executive in Miami, the Associated Press reports.

AP reported that the Florida Court of Appeals will hear the appeal on Tuesday. Connolly, 70, was convicted of providing information to mobsters who put the hit on former World Jai-Alai President John Callahan.

He was sentenced to 40 years in prison.

AP reports that Connolly’s attorneys are arguing that the statute of limitations expired on second-degree murder expired because Connolly never handled the murder weapon.

But prosecutors say Connolly was armed when he tipped off the mobsters in what resulted in the murder, AP reported.

At one time, Connolly was considered the FBI’s most effective mob investigator in Boston. He has a master’s degree in public administration from Harvard.

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST

Ex-Head of Miami FBI Paul Philip to Evaluate Miami Police Dept.

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

The former head of the Miami FBI has been hired by the city to evaluate its police department on issues including morale, policy and emails written by the police chief, the Miami Herald reported.

Paul Philip, 63, who led the FBI office in the 1990s, has agreed to work 20 hours a week and get paid $33.50 an hour as a special advisor on public safety, the Herald reported.

Philip had also worked as an anti-corruption czar for then-Miami-Dade Mayor Alex Penelas.

Philip is a partner at the security and consulting company Gaffney, Gallagher & Philip in Plantation, Fla.