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Tag: Mexico

Authorities Roundup 48 Suspects in U.S. in Crackdown on Mexican Drug Cartel

Weapons seized in operation/DEA photo
Weapons seized in operation/DEA photo

More and more media outlets in recent months were reporting on  Mexican drug violence that was spilling into the U.S. Authorities hope this will address some of the problem, but obviously it will take more than this to make it go away.

By Josh Meyer
Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON — Federal authorities said today that they have arrested 48 people in California, Minnesota and Maryland as part of a 21-month investigation targeting the Sinaloa Cartel, a Mexican drug trafficking organization that U.S. officials fear has spread into scores of American cities.

In Operation Xcellerator, federal, state and local law enforcement officials in the U.S. worked closely with authorities in Mexico and Canada to arrest more than 751 people on narcotics-related charges, and seized more than 20 tons of narcotics, a Justice Department official said.

Mexico’s Drug Violence is Arizona’s Headache Too

It seems for far too long the U.S. has failed to do enough to keep the drug violence in Mexico from spilling over into the U.S. states like Texas, Calif. and Arizona. The time has come to do something.

By RANDAL C. ARCHIBOLD
New York Times
PHOENIX – The raging drug war among cartels in Mexico and their push to expand operations in the United States has led to a wave of kidnappings, shootings and home invasions in Arizona, state and federal officials said at a legislative hearing on Monday.

The drug trade has long brought violence to the state, which serves as a hub as illicit drugs, like cocaine and marijuana, and illegal immigrants are smuggled to the rest of the nation.
For Full Story

About 1 American A Week Is Being Murdered In Mexico

The drug wars, the homicide, the violence south of the border is taking its toll on Americans.

By LISE OLSEN
Houston Chronicle
HOUSTON — A 22-year-old man from Houston and his 16-year-old friend are hauled out of a minivan in Mexico, shot execution style by thugs in a black Lincoln Continental, and left dead in the dirt.
The body of a 65-year-old nurse from Brownsville is found floating in the Rio Grande after a visit to a Mexican beauty salon.
An American retiree, an ex-Marine, is stabbed to death as he camps on a Baja beach with his dog.
More than 200 U.S. citizens have been slain in Mexico’s escalating wave of violence since 2004 – an average of nearly one killing a week, according to a Houston Chronicle investigation into the deaths.
Rarely are the killers captured.
The U.S. State Department tracks most American homicides abroad, but the department releases minimal statistics and doesn’t include victims’ names or details about the deaths. The Chronicle examined hundreds of records to document the personal tragedies behind them.
For Full Story

High-Ranking Anti-Drug Official Murdered After One Day on Job

As the violence rages on, drug traffickers are trying to send a message to the government: Don’t Get in Our Way!

By CNN
MEXICO CITY — A recently retired Mexican army general whose bullet-riddled body was found Tuesday near Cancun had taken over as the area’s top antidrug official less than 24 hours earlier, officials said.
A soldier guards the forensics office where the body of a slain former general was taken in Cancun, Mexico.
Retired Gen. Mauro Enrique Tello Quiñonez, his aide and a driver were tortured before being killed, said Quintana Roo state prosecutor Bello Melchor Rodriguez y Carrillo. He said there was no doubt Tello and the others were victims of organized crime.
For Full Story

Expensive Web Cameras at Texas-Mexico Border Not Paying Off

The 21st Century high-tech equipment should be taking law enforcement to new heights. But in this case, it may be taking it to marginal heights.

By Brandi Grissom
El Paso Times
AUSTIN — A virtual border surveillance program Gov. Rick Perry has committed millions of taxpayer dollars to fell far short of expectations during the first six months of operation.
Border sheriffs, who Perry gave $2 million to line the Texas-Mexico border with hundreds of Web cameras, installed only about a dozen and made just a handful of apprehensions as a result of tips from online viewers.
Reports obtained by the El Paso Times under the Texas Public Information Act show that the cameras produced a fraction of the objectives Perry outlined.
Perry’s office acknowledged the reported results were a far from the expectations but said the problem was with the yardstick used to measure the outcome and not with the camera program.

For Full Story

Mexican Hitman Suspected of Dumping 300+ Bodies in Vats of Lye

Clearly, one question you did not want to ask Santiago Meza Lopez: Is it soup yet?

By Richard Marosi
Los Angeles Times
SAN DIEGO — A suspected hit man who allegedly dumped more than 300 bodies in vats of lye at the behest of a top Tijuana crime boss has been arrested near Ensenada, according to the Mexican military.
Alleged crime boss Teodoro Garcia Simental, nicknamed El Teo, narrowly escaped after soldiers on Thursday raided an upscale resort outside the Baja California port city 70 miles south of San Diego, according to one Mexican news report.
The military said Santiago Meza Lopez, a 45-year-old from the state of Sinaloa, was arrested after allegedly trying to flee from soldiers and federal agents on the Ensenada- Tijuana coastal highway. Soldiers also arrested Garcia’s cook and seized four automatic weapons and two grenades.
Military authorities said Meza admitted being Garcia’s body disposal expert, nicknamed “El Pozolero del Teo” — roughly translated: Teo’s soup maker.

For Full Story

Columnist Says U.S. Better Step Up Efforts to Help Mexico In Violent Drug War

Michael Braun

Michael Braun

Some experts say the U.S. better get more proactive and help the Mexican government fight drugs. The consequences of not helping out enough could be devastating.

By Michael Braun
Security DeBrief

After I read Tony Kimery’s outstanding article in HSToday entitled, ‘Savage Struggle on the Border,’ I could not help but dwell on the irony and absurdity of what’s happening in both Mexico and the United States as a result of this war.
I am stunned by the fact that most Americans have paid little attention, if any at all, to the drug related violence in Mexico, and I’m even more concerned that they have not made the connection to the threat that this sustained bloodbath poses to our national security. If the brave Mexican law enforcement, military and security forces under President Calderon’s direction lose this ‘all or nothing’ fight with the cartels, Mexico will certainly become a narco-state, and life as we know it in both Mexico and the United States will change forever.
There were well over sixty beheadings in Mexico last year, yet the brutality being unleashed by the cartels is seldom deemed newsworthy by America’s media. However, if there were a beheading in Iraq or Afghanistan today by a Muslim extremist group, it would receive international coverage and would certainly receive global condemnation.

Read more »

U.S. Starting to Pour Hundreds of Millions into Mexico To Stop the Violent Expansion of Drug Traffickers

The drug war south of the border is out of control. At a recent law enforcement conference in Southern Calif., law enforcement officers were warned not to cross into Mexico for fun.
By Josh Meyer
Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON – The U.S. has begun pouring hundreds of millions of dollars into Mexico to help stanch the expansion of drug-fueled violence and corruption that has claimed more than 5,000 lives south of the border this year.
The bloodshed has spread to American cities, even to the heartland, and U.S. officials are realizing that their fight against powerful drug cartels responsible for the carnage has come down to this: Either walk away or support Mexican President Felipe Calderon’s strategy, even with the risk that counter-narcotics intelligence, equipment and training could end up in the hands of cartel bosses.
Both nations agree that the cartels have morphed into transnational crime syndicates that pose an urgent threat to their security and that of the region. Law enforcement agencies from the border to Maine acknowledge that the traffickers have brought a war once dismissed as a foreign affair to the doorstep of local communities. The trail of slayings, kidnappings and other crimes stretches through at least 195 U.S. cities.
For Full Story