Links

Columnists



Site Search


Entire (RSS)
Comments (RSS)

Archive Calendar

December 2021
S M T W T F S
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031  

Guides

How to Become a Bounty Hunter



Tag: malcolm x

J. Edgar Hover Ordered Bureau to Hide That Witnesses to Malcolm X’s Assassination Were FBI Informants

Former FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover at his desk. Photo: FBI

By Steve Neavling

FBI informants witnessed Malcolm X’s 1965 assassination and were told not to reveal their work with the bureau when talking with police and prosecutors, according to a prosecutor. 

Manhattan District Attorney Cy Vance made the disclosure on Thursday when asking a judge to throw out the convictions of two of the three men convicted in the civil rights murder, The New York Times reports.

“We now have reports revealing that on orders from director J. Edgar Hoover himself, the F.B.I. ordered multiple witnesses not to tell police or prosecutors that they were in fact F.B.I. informants,” Vance said in court.

Based on the prosecutor’s motion to vacate the convictions, Judge Ellen Biben exonerated Muhammad A. Aziz, 83, and Khalil Islam, who died in 2009. Thomas Hagan, who also was convicted in the murder, confessed to the killing during his trial but was adamant that the two other men were not involved. His conviction stands. 

The only men who said they witnessed Aziz and Islam participate in the killing were FBI informants, Vance said. The bureau never revealed that information to the defense.  

A nearly two-year investigation by prosecutors and the Innocence Project found that FBI documents also showed that a description of the assassins did not match Aziz or Islam.

“In short, it is unknown whether the identification procedures used in this case were properly conducted,” the motion to vacate stated, ABC News reports.

In a letter to the bureau’s office in New York one year before the assassination, Hoover asked agents to “do something about Malcolm X,” according to previously disclosed documents. 

2 Men Found Guilty in Malcolm X Killing to Be Exonerated Because FBI, Police Withheld Evidence

Malcolm X. Photo: Wikipedia

By Steve Neavling

Two of three men convicted in the 1965 killing of civil rights leader Malcolm X are expected to be exonerated after authorities said the FBI and police had withheld evidence in the case, The New York Times first reported.

District Attorney Cyrus Vance Jr. said a 22-month investigation revealed that law enforcement withheld evidence in the trial of Muhammad A. Aziz, 83, and Khalil Islam, who died in 2009. Both men have maintained their innocence from the beginning. 

“This points to the truth that law enforcement over history has often failed to live up to its responsibilities,” Mr. Vance said. “These men did not get the justice that they deserved.”

Thomas Hagan, who also was convicted in the murder, confessed to the killing during his trial but was adamant that the two other men were not involved. His conviction stands. 

Malcolm X was delivering a speech when he was fatally shot at New York’s Audubon Ballroom on Feb. 21, 1965. 

Malcolm X’s Family Uncovers Letter Alleging FBI, NYPD Conspired in His Assassination

By Steve Neavling

The family of Malcolm X have made public a letter they say shows the New York Police Department and FBI conspired to assassinate the civil rights leader in 1965. 

The letter, written in January 2011 by Raymond A. Wood, a now-dead NYPD officer who was on duty when Malcom X was killed and said that he had “participated in actions in hindsight were deplorable and detrimental to the advancement of my own black people,” The Washington Post reports.

In the letter, Woods states that his supervisors compelled him to coax two members of Malcolm X’s security team into committing crimes that led to their arrests just days before the shooting. As a result, the members of the security team were unable to provide security at a ballroom where Malcolm X had been killed. He says the arrest was part of a coordinated attempt between NYPD and the FBI to have Malcolm X killed, according to the letter. 

“Under the direction of my handlers, I was told to encourage leaders and members of the civil rights groups to commit felonious acts,” Wood’s letter stated.

Woods said the NYPD hired him to infiltrate civil rights groups “to find evidence of criminal activity so the F.B.I. could discredit and arrest its leader.”

After threatening to resign, Woods said his supervisor pledged to charge him with crimes he didn’t commit. 

The release of the letter coincides with the 56th anniversary of the assassination. 

Asked about the letter, White House press secretary Jen Psaki said, “I have not seen that letter.”

“If you want to provide it to us, I’m happy to have the right person look into it after the briefing.”

JFK Files Prompt Calls to Publicly Release Files on Civil Rights Killings

Martin Luther King Jr.

Martin Luther King Jr.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Tune into 910AM the Superstation at 11 a.m Friday for a discussion on the release of files on civil rights killings. 

The long-awaited release of secret John F. Kennedy assassination files has prompted a push for the FBI to release secret or redacted files on killings during the civil rights era.

Students from Highstown High School in New Jersey lobbied Congress to make the files public.

“This issue is not as prominent within the mainstream media, but it should be,” one of the students, senior Zabir Rahman, told the Clarion Ledger. “The families of the victims of these atrocious crimes deserve justice if they can get it and some measure of closure.” 

The students used the JFK Records Collection Act of 1992 as a model for what they called the “Cold Case Records Collection Act of 2017,” which would create an independent review board to coordinate the release of classified records on civil rights killings.

Many of the killings are detailed in FBI files that remain largely redacted. They include the KKK’s 1964 killing of civil rights workers James Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner and the 1959 lynching of Mack Charles Parker.

FBI records on the 1968 assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. also contain redactions.

Activists also are calling on redacted files relating to the 1965 assassination of Malcolm X.

Civil rights lawyers said the largely secret files make it difficult to solve cold cases.

The measure to release the files was introduced in March by U.S. Rep. Bobby Rush, an Illinois Democrat, and is under consideration by the House Government Reform and Oversight Committee.

So far the bill has received bipartisan support. Also backing the bill is Cynthia Deitle, a former FBI special agent who ran the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Cold Case Division.

“The Civil Rights Cold Case Records Collection Act of 2017 is a crucial piece of legislation that must be passed by Congress and signed by President Trump,” she Deitle in a statement. “We as a society can no longer wait for vital records housed within the FBI to stay within their exclusive control. The federal government needs to release the records to researchers, academics, journalists and others who are devoted to finding the truth as to what happened to thousands of individuals who were murdered as a result of racially-motivated homicides. We have the ability, with passage of this act, to rewrite history and bring justice long delayed.”

Grandson of Malcolm X Reportedly Arrested by FBI Before Trip to Iran

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

FBI agents reportedly arrested Muslim activist and grandson of Malcolm X, Malcolm Lateef Shabazz, before a scheduled visit to Iran, Press TV reports.

Shabazz was on his was way to attend the Hollywoodism International Conference in Tehran when agents arrested him.

Details are murky because the FBI has declined to provide information, Press TV reported.

The conference is popular among filmmakers, actors, directors and movie critics.

It’s unclear whether the trip was related, Press TV wrote.

Justice Dept. Declines to Re-investigate Malcolm X Assassination

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

The mystery surrounding the 1965 assassination of Malcolm X may remain just that — a mystery.

The New York Times reports that the Justice Department has declined to reinvestigate the assassination. It said the statute of limitations had expired on any federal laws that might apply.

“Although the Justice Department recognizes that the murder of Malcolm X was a tragedy, both for his family and for the community he served, we have determined that at this time, the matter does not implicate federal interests sufficient to necessitate the use of scarce federal investigative resources into a matter for which there can be no federal criminal prosecution,” the department said.

The Times reported that historians have long considered the assassination in New York in February 1965 unsolved. It said some feel a bungled investigation resulted in the imprisonment of the wrong people while allowing the guilty to go uncharged.

The Times reported that a new book,  “Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention”, has prompted some some advocates to push for a reopening of the case.

To read more click here.