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Tag: Mafia

Miami Feds Indict 11 Suspected Mobsters With Ties To N.Y. Bonanno Crime Family

Series May Be Gone, But the Mob Isn't

Series May Be Gone, But the Mob Isn't

The Sopranos tv series may have gone off the air, but the government says the traditional mob continues on.


By DON JORDAN
Palm Beach Post Staff Writer

Nearly a dozen Palm Beach and Broward county residents were indicted today (Thursday) after federal prosecutors outlined their alleged roles in a organized crime ring specializing in fraud, illegal narcotics, gambling and mob-style shakedowns.

The crew operated out of South Florida, but regularly reported and paid tribute to the powerful Bonanno Family, a New York City-based Mafia unit, according to the indictment from the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Miami.

Boynton Beach resident Thomas Fiore, 46, is an associate of the Bonanno family and leads its South Florida operation, prosecutors said. Each of the 11 alleged criminals were indicted on federal Racketeering Influenced and Corrupt Organizations, or RICO, charges after a two-year undercover investigation.

The other defendants include Billie Robertson, 34, and Lee Klein, 39, both of Boynton Beach; Daniel Young, 57, and Guy Alessi, 81, both of Delray Beach; Kenneth Dunn, 44, and Nicholas Fiore, 49, both of Boca Raton; and Frank D’Amato, 48, of West Palm Beach. The indictment also included Coral Springs residents Pasquale Rubbo, 43, Joseph Rubbo, 45, and Marc Broder, 42.

None of the defendents are formally inducted, or “made” members of the Bonanno family.
For Full Story

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST

The “Rats” In the Mob are Helping Feds Wipe Out the Families

John Gotti Jr./youtube

John Gotti Jr./youtube

They don’t make mobsters like they use to. In the day, most mobsters lived by the golden rule of silence. But these days, more and more of the boys are jumping ship and cutting deals.

By Tom Leonard
The Daily Telegraph of London
NEW YORK — ANYONE looking for evidence of the pathetic state of America’s once mighty Mafia could find it last week in one of Brooklyn’s federal courtrooms.

On the defence bench, a bespectacled 62-year-old man in scruffy green sweater and grey trousers sat impassively as an alleged former workmate, a fellow hitman in New York’s Gambino crime family, spilled the beans on everything from the murderousness of its menfolk to the infidelity of its women.

The trial of Charles Carneglia for five murders and racketeering charges has been electrified by the evidence of John Alite, a self-confessed assassin for the Gambino clan and their ruling family, the Gottis, who has “ratted” on his old friends.

Alite’s lurid succession of claims included that John Gotti Jr ordered a string of murders, that he (Alite) had an affair with Gotti’s married sister, Victoria, and that two police officers helped in at least one of the Gambino murders.

For Full Story

UNDER THE CATEGORY OF OTHER RATS

Bernie Madoff Expected to Plead Guilty Thursday (N.Y. Times)

Convicted Ex-FBI Agent John Connolly Tells Newsweek: “I’m a Catholic. I Say Rosary Everyday and Pray For My Innocence”

The fascination with ex-FBI agent John Connolly, convicted in a mob murder, continues. Newsweek visited him in a Miami jail to get his take on his conviction in a mob murder.

John Connolly

John Connolly

By Suzanne Smalley and Evan Thomas
Newsweek

For many years, John Connolly was the FBI’s most effective Mafia investigator in Boston. He has a master’s degree in public administration from Harvard. He says his “hero” is Bobby Kennedy and points to his family’s devotion to public service (his brother is a retired DEA agent, and his sister became a teacher). But when he met last week with a NEWSWEEK REPORTER at the Turner Guilford Knight Correctional Center in Miami, he was wearing shackles around his ankles. Once dashing and athletic, the 68-year-old Connolly was stooped and pot-bellied in his bright-red prison jumpsuit. His skin was paper-thin and white from lack of sunlight. For the past three and a half years, he has lived in a tiny, 10- by 12-foot cinder-block cell; his food is slipped to him through a slot in the heavy metal door. He is kept in solitary confinement for his own protection: a few years ago, Connolly says, another former FBI agent was badly beaten by inmates in the same jail.
Speaking with the reporter in a holding room, Connolly was grandfatherly, intelligent, emotional. “Believe me, I am innocent!” he declared, pumping his fist in the air. “I’m a Catholic. I say the rosary every day and pray for my innocence. I pray to Saint Jude, the saint of hopeless causes, and to Saint Rita, the saint of the impossible.”
For Full Story