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Tag: Justice Department

Justice Department Creates New Position to Focus on Threats of Homegrown Extremism

department-of-justice-logoBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The rising threat of homegrown extremism has prompted the Justice Department to create a new position to coordinate investigations, the Washington Post reports. 

The new position of domestic terrorism counsel is expected to be announced today at George Washington University.

The position will focus on threats posed by ISIS, as well as by racists and anti-government zealots.

Other Stories of Interest

FBI, Justice Department Trying to Determine Role Goldman Sachs Played in Corruption Case

goldman-sachs-logoBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The FBI has teamed up with the Justice Department to determine whether Goldman Sachs Group Inc. was involved in corruption and money laundering at 1Malaysia Development Bhd (1MDB), Business Insider reports. 

At this point, the inquiry does not suggest criminal wrongdoing by Goldman Sachs.

Investigators “have yet to determine if the matter will become a focus of any investigations into the 1MDB scandal,” the Wall Street Journal quoted a spokeswoman for the FBI as saying.

Officials have been investigating allegations that 1MDB management sent nearly $700 million to bank accounts of Prime Minister Najib Razak.

Justice Department to Let Loose 6,000 Prisoners in Largest One-Time Release

jail2photoBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Marking the largest one-time release of inmates, the Justice Department is releasing 6,000 prisoners to reduce overcrowding and help correct harsh sentences imposes on drug offenders over the past three decades, the Washington Post reports. 

The department’s Bureau of Prisons is setting the inmates free between Oct. 30 and Nov. 2, when about two-thirds will end up on supervised released after being placed in home confinement and halfway houses.

An additional 46,000 of the approximately 100,000 drug offenders also could be released early under a chance in sentencing guidelines.

“The number of people who will be affected is quite exceptional,” said Mary Price, general counsel for Families Against Mandatory Minimums, an advocacy group that supports sentencing reform.

Justice Department to Begin Tallying Number of Killings by Police Nationwide

Attorney General Loretta Lynch

Attorney General Loretta Lynch

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

For the first time, the federal government is tallying the number of killings by police around the country.

U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch announced a pilot program Monday to begin an open-source system to accurately account for every death at the hands of American law enforcement, the Guardian reports. 

The move comes after activists and lawmakers have called on the federal government to keep better track of the police killings.

The tracking program has begun but will be fully active at the beginning of 2016.

The Bureau pf Justice Statistics will run the program.

Identity Theft Targeted 17.6 Million Americans at Cost of $15.4B

Identity theftBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Identity thieves victimized about 7% of the U.S.’s adult population last year, the Justice Department reported.

About 17.6 million Americans older than 16 were targeted, The Washington Times reports. 

About 86% of those victims reported that identity thieves attempted to open credit cards or bank accounts in their name.

As a result of the thefts, victims lost a total of $15.4 billion.

Elderly people and household with annual incomes were disproportionately targeted.

Delaware Justice Department Investigates Fatal Police-Involved Shooting of Man in Wheelchair

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Delaware’s Justice Department is investigating the fatal police-involved shooting of a man in a wheelchair, the Washington Post reports. 

During a call about a possible self-inflicted gunshot wound, Wilmington police encountered a disabled man, who is black, armed with a handgun, police said.

A video shows officers approaching the man with guns drawing, demanding that he drop the weapon.

An officer fired a single gunshot after yelling, “Show me your hands!”

The man was shot several more times after appearing to get up from the chair.

He died at the scene.

“The office will take these steps as quickly as possible in order to provide an account of the incident to the public,” the department said in a statement. “Making a determination about whether a person — including a police officer — should be criminally prosecuted under Delaware law is the responsibility of the Delaware Department of Justice and the department will make that determination following investigation in this case.”

Despite All the Dead Motorists, GM Gets to Pay Off Justice Department

handshake

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

DETROIT — Imagine if you will, if former Detroit Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick was able to pay the Justice Department hundreds of thousands of dollars instead of going to prison for 28 years. Imagine if Boston gangster James “Whitey” Bulger, accused of having a hand in 19 murders, was able to pay a couple million dollars to the Justice Department instead of serving life in prison.  Imagine if Dr. Farid Fata, a Detroit area oncologist who administered chemotherapy to patients who didn’t even have cancer, paid a $10 million fine instead of getting a 45-year sentence.

And then imagine, if you will,  if General Motors was able to pay $900 million to the Justice Department in lieu of having some of its employees go to prison for sweeping under the rug a gravely serious problem with faulty ignitions that resulted in well over 100 deaths.

Call it murder.  Call it negligent homicide. Call it manslaughter.

Call it a bloody injustice. Call it a shame that General Motors is able to pay off the Justice Department to make a criminal case go away.  Reuters reported Wednesday that GM has agreed to pay about $900 million in fines and sign a deferred-prosecution agreement to end a federal investigation into its handling of problems.

The Justice Department will charge the company, not any individuals, with criminally hiding the defect from regulators and in the process defrauding consumers. So what.

The Justice Department has historically failed to address some corporate crimes appropriately by letting some folks off without prison time. The message is clear in cases like this: “Just give us money and we’ll make it go away.” GM could have recalled these dangerous cars with faulty ignitions 10 years ago, but nobody made them do it, so they didn’t.  Lives could have been saved.

Sure, GM’s CEO Mary T. Barra can take some credit for cleaning house and getting rid of those responsible. Now, those folks have lawyered up and shut their yaps.

The word is that the Justice Department didn’t have enough incriminating documents or a real whistleblower to put together a solid criminal case against individuals.

But that’s no reason not to pursue a criminal investigation. If the feds could get N.Y. Underboss Salvatore “Sammy The Bull” Gravano to flip and rat out his boss, John Gotti, they could certainly have worked the case more and gotten some white collar workers to flip on co-workers.

Again, Mary Barra and GM should get some credit for cooperating with a federal investigation and offering payouts to victims, but that shouldn’t mean a free pass for those who could have acted responsibly and saved lives.

The $900 million is certainly a lot of money to you and I. But for GM, that’s a quarterly earning. GM can absorb that.

We rely on the automakers to produce a safe product, one that many of us rely on nearly everyday of our adult lives.  We don’t expect the automakers to be perfect and always produce a flawless product.

But we do expect them to respond appropriately, and in a timely manner, when they realize a flaw in their product could kill us.

Unfortunately, the Justice Department has once again sent a message to the automakers that cover ups are OK, so long as you have the money to pay for them when you get caught.

 

Lengel: Despite All the Dead Motorists, GM Gets to Pay Off Justice Department

handshakeBy Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

DETROIT — Imagine if you will, if former Detroit Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick was able to pay the Justice Department hundreds of thousands of dollars instead of going to prison for 28 years. Imagine if Boston gangster James “Whitey” Bulger, accused of having a hand in 19 murders, was able to pay a couple million dollars to the Justice Department instead of serving life in prison.  Imagine if Dr. Farid Fata, the Detroit area oncologist who administered chemotherapy to patients who didn’t even have cancer, paid a $10 million fine instead of getting a 45-year sentence.

And then imagine, if you will,  if General Motors was able to pay $900 million to the Justice Department in lieu of having some of its employees go to prison for sweeping under the rug a gravely serious problem with faulty ignitions that resulted in well over 100 deaths.

Call it murder.  Call it negligent homicide. Call it manslaughter.

Call it a bloody injustice. Call it a shame that General Motors is able to pay off the Justice Department to make a criminal case go away.  Reuters reported Wednesday that GM has agreed to pay about $900 million in fines and sign a deferred-prosecution agreement to end a federal investigation into its handling of problems.

The Justice Department will charge the company, not any individuals, with criminally hiding the defect from regulators and in the process defrauding consumers. So what.

The Justice Department has historically failed to address some corporate crimes appropriately by letting some folks off without prison time. The message is clear in cases like this: “Just give us money and we’ll make it go away.” GM could have recalled these dangerous cars with faulty ignitions 10 years ago, but nobody made them do it, so they didn’t.  Lives could have been saved.

Sure, GM’s CEO Mary T. Barra can take some credit for cleaning house and getting rid of those responsible. Now, those folks have lawyered up and shut their yaps.

The word is that the Justice Department didn’t have enough incriminating documents or a real whistleblower to put together a solid criminal case against individuals.

But that’s no reason not to pursue a criminal investigation. If the feds could get N.Y. Underboss Salvatore “Sammy The Bull” Gravano to flip and rat out his boss, John Gotti, they could certainly have worked the case more and gotten some white collar workers to flip on co-workers.

Again, Mary Barra and GM should get some credit for cooperating with a federal investigation and offering payouts to victims, but that shouldn’t mean a free pass for those who could have acted responsibly and saved lives.

The $900 million is certainly a lot of money to you and I. But for GM, that’s a quarterly earning. GM can absorb that.

We rely on the automakers to produce a safe product, one that many of us rely on nearly everyday of our adult lives.  We don’t expect the automakers to be perfect and always produce a flawless product.

But we do expect them to respond appropriately, and in a timely manner, when they realize a flaw in their product could kill us.

Unfortunately, the Justice Department has once again sent a message to the automakers that cover ups are OK, so long as you have the money to pay for them when you get caught.