Links

Columnists



Site Search


Entire (RSS)
Comments (RSS)

Archive Calendar

September 2021
S M T W T F S
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
2627282930  

Guides

How to Become a Bounty Hunter



Tag: Justice Department

Merrick Garland Remembers Oklahoma City Bombing on 26th Anniversary

Attorney General Merrick Garland. (Photo: DOJ)

Attorney General Merrick Garland pledged to crack down on domestic violent extremists in a speech commemorating the 26th anniversary of the Oklahoma City bombing that killed 168 people. 

Garland, who led the prosecution of bomber Timothy McVeigh and his accomplice Terry Nichols, said the same brand of domestic extremism still exists. 

“Although many years have passed, the terror perpetrated by people like Timothy McVeigh is still with us,” Garland said at the Oklahoma City National Memorial and Museum. “The Department of Justice is pouring its resources into stopping domestic violent extremists before they can attack, prosecuting those who do, and battling the spread of the kind of hate that leads to tragedies like the one we mark here today.”

Garland spoke about white supremacy during his confirmation hearing earlier this year, citing the Oklahoma City bombing. 

“I supervised the prosecution of the perpetrators of the bombing of the Oklahoma City Federal Building, who sought to spark a revolution that would topple the Federal Government,” Garland told lawmakers in February. “If confirmed, I will supervise the prosecution of white supremacists and others who stormed the Capitol on Jan. 6, a heinous attack that sought to disrupt a cornerstone of our democracy, the peaceful transfer of power to a newly elected government.”

Read Garland’s full speech here.

More Than 410 Alleged Insurrectionists Arrested in Ongoing Probe of Jan. 6 Riot

Alex Gakos/Shutterstock.com

By Steve Neavling

The FBI has arrested more than 410 people accused of participating in the deadly riot at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. 

A CBS News review of 369 cases found that 163 suspects have been indicted by grand juries. 

According to the Justice Department, more than 100 alleged insurrectionists have been charged with assaulting, resisting or impeding officers or employees.

More than 35 of the suspects have been charged with bringing a dangerous or deadly weapon into the Capitol. 

About 30 suspects are accused of conspiring to coordinate with others, and at least 56 have been connected to extremists groups such as the Proud Boys, Oath Keepers and Three Percenters. 

Of those arrested, at least 38 are current or former military members. 

Investigators have executed more than 900 search warrants and are reviewing more than 15,000 hours of surveillance and body cam footage and have collected about 1,600 electronic devices. 

The alleged riots hail from at least 45 states. Of those, Texas had the most suspects (38), followed by Florida (31), Pennsylvania (30) and New York (26). 

Federal authorities previously said about 800 people stormed the Capitol, and the FBI has pledged to track down as many of the suspects as possible. 

In March, FBI Director Christopher Wray said the bureau has received more than 270,000 digital media tips. 

“With their help, we’ve identified hundreds of suspects and opened hundreds of investigations in all but one of our 56 field offices,” Wray said. 

DOJ Investigating Rep. Gaetz for Alleged Sexual Relationship with Teenage Girl

U.S. Rep. Matt Gaetz, R-Florida.

By Steve Neavling

The Justice Department is investigating U.S. Rep. Matt Gaetz, R-Fla., for a sexual relationship he allegedly had with a 17-year-old girl, The New York Times reports

The investigation is trying to determine whether Gaetz, a 38-year-old conservative firebrand and close ally of former President Trump, violated federal sex trafficking laws. The probe began under then-Attorney General William Barr. 

Gaetz denied the allegations on Twitter and in media interviews, saying he and his family “have been victims of an organized and criminal extortion involving a former DOJ official seeking $25 million while threatening to smear my name.”

“We have been cooperating with federal authorities in this matter and my father has even been wearing a wire at the FBI’s direction to catch these criminals,” Gaetz tweeted. The planted leak to the FBI tonight was intended to thwart the investigation.”

Gaetz repeated his denials on Tucker Carlson’s Fox News program, which the host later called “one of the weirdest interviews I’ve ever conducted.”

The investigation is part of a broader probe of allegations against Joel Greenberg, a former county official in Florida who was arrested last year on charges of sex trafficking of a minor. 

https://twitter.com/ArtValley818_/status/1377073895421870082

President Biden Nominates Ronald Davis to Serve As Head of U.S. Marshals Service

Ronald Davis with President Obama. (Photo via Twitter)

By Steve Neavling

President Biden on Friday nominated Ronald Davis to serve as director of the U.S. Marshals Service. 

Davis is a former police chief who served in the Obama administration as director of the Justice Department’s Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS).  

Davis has a long career in law enforcement. He served for eight years as chief of the East Palo Alto Police Department and 20 years with the Oakland Police Department in California. 

In December 2014, President Obama appointed him to serve as executive director of the Task Force on 21st Century Policing. 

“Davis was recognized for his innovative community efforts and for working collaboratively with the community to dramatically reduce crime and violence in a city once named as the murder capital of the United States,” Biden’s administration said in a news release.

Davis is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine Reducing Racial Inequalities in the Criminal Justices System Committee. 

Davis received a bachelor’s degree from Southern Illinois University and completed the Senior Executives in State and Local Government Program at Harvard University Kennedy School of Government.

DOJ Expects to Charge At Least 100 More Capitol Rioters, Calls Probe ‘Largest in American History’

Alex Gakos/Shutterstock.com

By Steve Neavling

The Justice Department said it expects to charge at least 100 more people in connection with the violent attack on the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. 

Calling the investigation one of the “largest in American history,” U.S. prosecutors are asking for more time to wade through enormous amounts of evidence, The Washington Post reports.

“The investigation and prosecution of the Capitol Attack will likely be one of the largest in American history, both in terms of the number of defendants prosecuted and the nature and volume of the evidence,” the U.S. attorney’s office in D.C. wrote in court filings.

As of Friday, 312 people have been charged in connection with the riots, and investigators have accumulated more than 15,000 hours of law enforcement and body-cam video footage, 1,600 electronic devices and 210,00 tips, prosecutors said 

More than 100 federal prosecutors are involved. 

The riots led to the deaths of five people and injuries to about 140 officers. 

U.S. Marshals, HSI Rescue 31 Missing Children After Yearlong Operation

By Steve Neavling

Federal and local authorities have rescued 31 missing children following a monthlong operation, the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Northern District of Texas announced. 

The U.S. Marshals Service and Homeland Security Investigations partnered with local police on “Operation Missing in the Metroplex,” reuniting the children with their legal guardians. 

“To observe law enforcement partnerships and community concerns culminate into such a successful recovery outcome is rewarding,” Acting U.S. Marshal Quintella Downs-Bradshaw said in a statement. “Victims should know they are not forgotten, there is hope and a way to return home.”

Seven of the children – all girls between the ages of 13 and 17 – were tied to sex trafficking. 

“While this joint operation lasted approximately 30 days, HSI Dallas will continue working relentlessly to identify and recover missing children who become vulnerable to human traffickers across the North Texas region,” HSI Dallas Special Agent in Charge Ryan L. Spradlin said. “Our continued collaboration with our local, state and federal law-enforcement partners and non-governmental organizations is vital to combatting this global epidemic.”

Garland Sworn in As Attorney General, Vows to Restore Faith in DOJ

Attorney General Merrick Garland is sworn in. Photo via DOJ.

By Steve Neavling

Attorney General Merrick Garland was sworn-in Thursday and pledged to “adhere to norms” and restore the Justice Department’s reputation for political independence. 

“We are united by our commitment to protecting our country as our oath says, ‘from all enemies, foreign and domestic.’ And by our commitment to enforcing our country’s laws and to ensuring the civil rights and the civil liberties of our people,” Garland said in an address to the DOJ’s 115,000 employees on his first day of work. “The only way we can succeed and retain the trust of the American people is to adhere to the norms that have become part of the DNA of every Justice Department employee since Edward Levi’s stint as the first post-Watergate attorney general.” 

He concluded the speech by saying, “I am honored to work with you once again. Together, we will show the American people by word and deed that the Department of Justice pursues equal justice and adheres to the rule of law.”

Read Garland’s full speech here.

The Senate confirmed Garland on Wednesday with a 70-30 vote. 

Garland, 68, rose to national prominence in 2016 when President Obama nominated him to the U.S. Supreme Court, but Republicans denied him a hearing. 

Garland was appointed to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit in 1997. 

Garland is a graduate of Harvard University’s college and law school. 

Whistleblowers Accuse High-Ranking DOJ Official of Injecting Politics into Hiring

By Steve Neavling

Two whistleblowers have accused a high-ranking Justice Department official of injecting politics into the hiring process by appointing an inexperienced attorney over more qualified candidates. 

Jeffrey Bossert Clark was acting assistant attorney general in charge of the department’s Civil Division when he conducted a bogus interview process for the assistant director position of the Civil Division, the whistleblowers alleged in documents obtained by NPR.

The whistleblowers are calling for an investigation in a letter to House and Senate lawmakers and the DOJ’s inspector general. 

The appointment came just days before Clark left the post in January. 

The five-page letter states that Clark appointed an attorney who “volunteered and was part of the DOJ litigation team defending a controversial Trump administration policy … that barred pregnant, unaccompanied minors in federal immigration custody from obtaining abortions.”

In an email to CNN, Clark defended the appointment. 

“Civil Division managers sent me three candidates to interview, each of whom they rated well-qualified. I interviewed all three using the same process I had used for other positions. I think it’s very unfortunate that the disappointed applicants would attack their own colleague’s selection,” he said. “That candidate had strong leadership qualities and was the best qualified. Pointing to that lawyer’s work on the Garza litigation, with a D.C. Circuit decision that came out years befoe I joined the Civil Division, is just a baseless attempt to cast aspersions.”