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Tag: Jury

Disgust, Fear Rattled Jurors Tasked with Deciding Fate of mobster ‘Whitey’ Bulger

Updated Bulger photo/wbur

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

For the four women and eight men tasked with deciding whether notorious mobster James “Whitey” Bulger was guilty of murder and racketeering, life was not easy.

Sometimes the jurors shouted at each other; other times they felt disgusted with the sleazy witnesses.

The trial was so stressful that some even popped aspirin to soothe headaches, the Boston Globe reports after interviewing some jury members.

Juror Janet Uhlar, 56, of Eastham, said she was disgusted to hear that some witnesses were never jailed despite committing murders.

“It really broke my heart to see that happening, to see what our founding fathers laid down their lives for, the judicial system, corrupted like that,” Uhlar told the Globe.

The jury convicted Bulger on 31 of 32 counts Monday. He has not yet been sentenced.

‘Whitey’ Bulger Trial Enters Fourth Day After Judge Urges Jurors to Reach Verdict on All Counts

 

Whitey Bulger/fbi

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Jurors in the trial of James “Whitey” Bulger entered the fourth day of deliberations today after a judge urged them Thursday to try to reach a verdict on each of the racketeering counts, the Boston Globe reports.

“You have a duty to attempt to reach agreement on each of the racketeering acts . . . if you can do so conscientiously,” Judge Casper told jurors.

That’s a tall task for jurors considering a 32-count indictment that includes murder, the Globe reported.

One of Bulger’s attorneys, J.W. Carney, Jr., said he’s happy to see thoughtful deliberations.

“All Americans can be proud of this jury,” he said. “They have taken their constitutional role with great seriousness and are clearly looking closely at the evidence, evaluating the credibility of witnesses, and applying the instructions given to them by Judge Casper.”

 

Long-Awaited Trial of James ‘Whitey’ Bulger Begins Today in Boston Courtroom

Updated Bulger photo/wbur

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Opening statements begin today in the long-anticipated trial of James “Whitey” Bulger, who is accused of murder, racketeering, extortion, money laundering, gun stockpiling and drug dealing.

Before his arrest, Bulger was so notorious that he shared the top spot on the FBI’s most-wanted list with terrorist Osama bin Laden, The New York Times reports.

A jury was sworn in Tuesday from a pool of 858 candidates, The Times reported.

Bulger also happened to be a long-time FBI informant.

John Edwards Jurors Say Evidence Wasn’t There But They Thought He Was Guilty of Something

 
 
By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

The jurors in the John Edwards trial told network news stations that prosecutor simply didn’t have enough evidence to convict.

The Wall Street Journal reported that three jurors told NBC’s Matt Lauer the evidence was lacking. Jury foreman David Recchion singled out prosecution witness Andrew Young as a big problem in the prosecution’s case

“That was probably the key part of the miss for the prosecution,” he said.

One juror, Linda Aguaro, said, “I think he was guilty, but like we said, the evidence just was not there for us to prove guilt”

All three said they thought Edwards was guilty of something, but none raised their hand when asked if they thought Edwards was a bad guy.

To read more click here.

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST

The John Edwards Case Just Didn’t Feel Right

Edwards after the trial/ from NBC newscast

 By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Some federal cases are too complicated for jurors. Some may be borderline illegal. And some may end up being a waste of taxpayer money.

The trial against ex-presidential hopeful John Edwards was probably all of the above.  A jury on Thursday acquitted him on one count and deadlocked on five others in a scandal that involved using nearly $1 million  – in what should have been declared as campaign funds — to help hide an extra-marital affair during the 2008 campaign.

It had a lot of gossip appeal, which made for good press, but in the end it seemed to lack the appropriate outrage quotient necessary to get all the jurors to jump into the guilty pool.

Who’s the loser.

The list is long.

For one, Edwards paid some serious bucks for a top-flight legal team.

Additionally, his reputation, which was already pretty poor, got tarnished even more. If you had any doubts that he was a sleaze, the trial helped put those to rest.

And he had to bear responsibility watching his family suffer through the trial.

 

The Justice Department once again looks bad. Granted, federal prosecutors shouldn’t fear losing. They should just worry about standing on solid ground. Some how, this one didn’t ever feel right to me.

The feds should have gone after some hefty civil fines. Edwards has lots of money. He would have gladly paid to make it go away. Maybe the money could have been put to good use.

And then there’s the former U.S. Attorney George Holding, who stuck around in his post to make sure that Edwards was indicted. He’s running for Congress and is expected to win.

But there’s talk of him jumping into the Senate race in North Carolina in 2014. A conviction of Edwards could only have bolstered his political capital. Now, sorry George, no added points for you.

So at this point, the question is: Should the feds go for a retrial?

I say absolutely not. In a case like this, one bite of the apple is enough. It’s not like the Rod Blagojevich case, which was certainly worth going after a second time after Blago was convicted on only 1 of 24 counts. The feds nailed him the second time.

This one is not worth going after again. Was Edwards a sneak? Yes. Is he a sleaze? Yes.

As the Washington Post noted:

“The mixed result in a trial that laid bare Edwards’s sexual indiscretions and serial deceptions came after nine days of jury deliberations.”

There are bigger crimes out there. And he’s paid  for his digressions. Let’s move on, and let’s forget we knew a Presidential candidate named John Edwards.

He is not worthy.

Blago Jury Enters 6th Day of Deliberations

Rod Blagojevich/from his website

Rod Blagojevich/from his website

UPDATE: Wed. 10:46 p.m. — Jurors failed to reach a verdict Wednesday. Thursday will mark the 7th day of deliberations.
By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

No surprise that federal jurors in the Rod Blagojevich corruption trial haven’t reached a verdict yet after five days considering they have 24 counts to sift through.

Wednesday will mark the start of the sixth day of deliberations. Don’t be surprised if a verdict doesn’t come til Friday at the earliest, and more likely, next week.

The Chicago Sun-Times reports that 11 of counts center around an alleged plan to sell the senate seat vacated by President Obama.

Also on Wednesday, attorneys in the case will meet with the judge to talk about the possibility of jurors considering seizing Blago’s property if he’s found guilty, the Associated Press reported.

Meanwhile, Sun-Times columnist Michael Sneed reports that the ex-governor spent Tuesday celebrating his daughter Amy’s 15th birthday.

“The family is being very low key and pretty much staying behind closed doors,”a source said, according to Sneed. “Rod is still jogging, he is not writing a book about his trial experience and other than talking to his lawyers . . . no friends are visiting. After all, all his friends testified against him.”

Experts Say Wiretap Conversations Spell Big Big Trouble For Gov. Blagojevich

Even though he knew he was under investigation by one of the most tenacious U.S. Attorneys in the country, Gov. Rod Blagojevich just kept talking on the phone. That cavalier yapping could prove toxic in trial.

By Kevin Johnson
USA TODAY

If Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich has a chance at combating the conspiracy charges against him, legal analysts say, he must never let a jury hear his own words captured on federal government wiretaps.
The governor was arrested Tuesday on charges that included conspiring to sell the U.S. Senate seat vacated by President-elect Barack Obama.
Notre Dame law professor Jimmy Gurule, a former Justice Department official, describes the tapes as the “breathtaking” centerpiece of the government’s prosecution. “Unless the governor is successful in keeping the conversations out of a future trial, it’s hard to imagine what the defense is,” Gurule says.
Attorney Roscoe Howard, former chief federal prosecutor in Washington, says the recordings represent “the corpus of the crime” that will be difficult to attack if they are admitted as evidence in a courtroom.
“The governor is in deep trouble,” Howard says.
For Full Story

Paper Reports that Businessmen Wanted to Raise $1 million For Ill. Gov to Help Jesse Jackson Jr. Get Senate Seat (AP)

VIDEO OF STATE ATTY Gen. Seeking to Have Governor Removed

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a9KnNM5rWtk