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Tag: james comey

James Comey to Publish Two Crime Novels ‘Inspired by Real Work’

James Comey (Twitter photo)

By Steve Neavling

Former FBI Director James Comey is trying his hand at something new and familiar – fiction writing. 

Comey announced Tuesday that he’s set to publish his first of two novels in the spring. 

Comey has a deal to publish two novels for Mysterious Press. 

The first, titled “Central Park West,” features an assistant U.S. attorney who investigates the mafia’s ties to the murder of a local politician. 

“I’m excited to take readers inside fascinating worlds I’ve come to know from my time in government and the private sector,” Comey said in a statement.

“These stories are fiction, but, inspired by real work I’ve done, they will offer a rarely-seen view of interesting people and institutions.”

Comey wrote two nonfiction books, A Higher Loyalty and Saving Justice

IRS Asks Inspector General to Investigate Rare Tax Audits of Comey, McCabe

Former FBI Director James Comey

By Steve Neavling

The head of the IRS asked the Treasury Department’s internal watchdog to investigate the circumstances surrounding the rare, exhaustive and supposedly random audits of former FBI Director James Comey and his then-deputy Andrew McCabe. 

The FBI leaders drew the ire of former President Trump before they were selected for the audit.

“The I.R.S. has referred the matter to the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration for review,” the agency said in a statement. 

The IRS said its commissioner, Charles P. Rettig, “personally reached out” to the inspector general’s office after the audits came to his attention. 

Democrats also called for an internal investigation. 

“Donald Trump has no respect for the rule of law, so if he tried to subject his political enemies to additional I.R.S. scrutiny, that would surprise no one. We need to understand what happened here because it raises serious concerns,” Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., chairman of the Senate Finance Committee, said. 

Comey, McCabe Underwent Rare, Intensive Audit After Tiff with Trump

James Comey (Twitter photo)

By Steve Neavling

Former FBI Director James Comey and his then-deputy Andrew McCabe were selected by the IRS for an intensive, rare and purportedly random audit, The New York Times reports

Comey and McCabe both received letters from the IRS indicating it was conducting National Research Program audits of their tax returns. 

“We must examine randomly-selected tax returns to better understand tax compliance and improve the fairness of the tax system,” the letters state.

The audits drew suspicion because they are extremely rare, and Comey and McCabe had both drawn the ire of former President Donald Trump. 

In fact, the odds of being selected for the audit is about one in every 30,600. 

“Maybe it’s a coincidence or maybe somebody misused the IRS to get at a political enemy,” Comey told The Times. “Given the role Trump wants to continue to play in our country, we should know the answer to that question.”

As a result of the audit, Comey received a $347 refund, and McCabe owed a small amount of money. 

“The revenue agent I dealt with was professional and responsive,” McCabe said. “Nevertheless, I have significant questions about how or why I was selected for this.”

Prospective FBI Agents Are Eligible for a Job If They’ve Used Marijuana No More Than 24 Times

By Steve Neavling

Former pot smokers are now eligible to become FBI agents – as long as they haven’t used cannabis more than 24 times as an adult. 

That’s according to a recently revised policy for would-be agents, first reported by Marijuana Moment.

The FBI began taking a more tolerant approach to marijuana use among would-be agents earlier this year. Under a policy revised in June, job applicants were qualified to become agents if they haven’t consumed cannabis for at least one year. 

The bureau revised the policy again in the past month, this time limiting eligibility to applicants who have not used cannabis more than 24 times. 

It’s one clear why the bureau draws the line at two dozen. 

The updated policy says that candidates who “have used marijuana or any of its various forms (e.g., cannabis, hashish (hash), hash oil, or tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), synthetic or natural), in any location (domestic or foreign) regardless of the legality in that location of use, more than twenty-four (24) times after turning 18 years old is a disqualifier for FBI employment.”

In 2014, then-FBI Director James Comey mentioned a less restrictive employment policy for former marijuana users.  

“I have to hire a great work force to compete with those cyber criminals and some of those kids want to smoke weed on the way to the interview,” Comey said at the time.

Comey Regrets Not Standing Up More to Trump

Former FBI James Comey in previous testimony, via FBI.

By Steve Neavling

FBI Director James Comey said he should have stood up more to former President Trump. 

In an interview with British program, Channel 4 News, Comey said he did “think about some of my encounters with President Trump.”

“For example, when he demanded loyalty and we ended up on this odd compromise where he demanded ‘honest loyalty.’ I should have stood up and said ‘no’ you are not going to get any kind of loyalty from the FBI director, but instead I compromised to avoid a conflict with him,” Comey said. 

“I don’t want to be too tough on myself because I stood up well enough to get fired, but there are things like that I would do differently.” 

When asked if he still believes President Biden should pardon Trump so the country can move forward, Comey also said “it is a close question.”

“On balance, it would be better for the United States if the Department of Justice didn’t prosecute him for his obstructions of justice and his extortions and his other crimes committed while he was president,” he said. “Whether President Biden pardons him is another question.”

Comey added, “I think it’s important that we as a country not give him center stage in our nation’s capital for the next three years which a prosecution would.”

Trump Slammed Comey for ‘Erratic’ Behavior in Previously Unseen Letter

Former FBI Director James Comey.

By Steve Neavling

Just days before President Trump fired James Comey in May 2017, he assailed his FBI director for “erratic” and “self-indulgent” conduct in a four-page letter that was never sent because White House lawyers advised against it. 

The letter was finally made public Monday after ABC News received a copy of its contents.

“Your conduct has grown unpredictable and even erratic – including rambling and self-indulgent public performances that have baffled experts, citizens and law enforcement professionals alike – making it impossible for you to effectively lead this agency,” Trump wrote to Comey.

The letter assailed Comey for “spen[ding] too much time cultivating a public image, and not enough time getting your own house in order.”

About half the letter addressed Comey’s handling of the FBI’s investigation of Hillary Clinton’s private email server. That included Comey’s congressional testimony shortly before the letter was penned. In the letter, Trump called the testimony “another media circus full of unprofessional conjecture, bizarre legal theories, and irresponsible speculation.”

The letter then falsely claimed that Comey’s “strange legal decisions and contradictory public statements” had “sowed confusion” and inspired “a near-rebellion by many rank-and-file agents” within the FBI.

The letter also chided Comey’s “failure” to prevent “rampant leaking. 

“You’ve shown a total inability to control leaks, both within and outside the agency. As a result, intelligence — real and fake – has been weaponized into an instrument of partisan warfare,” the letter said.

Trump concluded, “America needs an FBI director who inspires confidence across all layers of government, and who the public believes to be fair, impartial and beyond reproach.”

Comey: Prosecuting Trump for Inciting Riot Will Give Him Attention He Craves

Former FBI James Comey in previous testimony, via FBI.

By Steve Neavling

Former FBI Director James Comey said federal prosecutors shouldn’t charge President Trump for his role in inciting the Capitol riot because it would give him the attention he craves. 

“The country would be better off if we did not give him the platform that a prosecution would for the next three years,” Comey told the British broadcaster Sky News.

“Instead, turn off the camera lights,” said Comey, whom Trump fired as FBI director in 2017 while he was leading an investigation into possible collusion with Russia by Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign.

“I’d like to see some of the lights go out and he can stand on the front lawn at Mar-a-Lago and shout at cars in his bathrobe and none of us will hear it,” he said.

Trump fired Comey as FBI director in 2017, leading to the appointment of Robert Muller as special counsel overseeing the investigation into Russia’s interference in the 2016 election. 

Comey, 60, said he supports the Senate convicting Trump as part of the House’s impeachment. But, Comey said, a prosecution would further divide the country. 

“The country needs to find a way to heal itself, and the new president needs the opportunity to lead and heal us — both literally and spiritually,” Comey said. “And that will be much, much harder if the Donald Trump show is on our television screens every single day in the nation’s capita

Comey to Begin Teaching at Columbia University Next Month

Former FBI Director James Comey

By Steve Neavling

Former FBI Director James Comey will begin teaching at Columbia University next month, the school announced Tuesday. 

As a leader-in-residence for the spring semester, Comey will teach a new seminar entitled “Lawyers and Leaders” at the Reuben Mark Initiative for Organizational Character and Leadership at Columbia Law School.  

“Comey’s experience represents a broadening of the Mark Initiative’s focus to include leadership of major public institutions, complementing existing offerings relating to corporations and law firms,” the university said on its website

“Very excited to return to teaching at Columbia in the new year,” Comey tweeted.