Links

Columnists



Site Search


Entire (RSS)
Comments (RSS)

Archive Calendar

September 2021
S M T W T F S
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
2627282930  

Guides

How to Become a Bounty Hunter



Tag: Iraq

FBI’s Chris Briese Who Oversaw Interrogation Team for Saddam Hussein to Head Up Charlotte Division

Chris Briese/fbi photo

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

M. Chris Briese, the deputy assistant director for the FBI’s Critical Incident Response Team at Quantico, and who once oversaw  the interrogation team for Saddam Hussein,  is headed south to take charge of the bureau’s Charlotte Division, the FBI announced Monday.

Briese joined the FBI in 1987 and was first stationed in Los Angeles where he worked bank robberies, interstate theft, foreign counterintelligence and international terrorism matters.

In February 1996, he was promoted to the National Security Division in the Counterterrorism Planning Section at FBI headquarters, the FBI said. He was a founding member of the Weapons of Mass Operations Unit, and specialized in chemical and biological terrorism issues.

Two years later, he transferred to the Minneapolis Division in a supervisory role, and oversaw international and domestic terrorism, foreign counterintelligence programs and the St. Cloud Resident Agency.

He established the Minneapolis Joint Terrorism Task Force, which was responsible for the arrest of Zacarias Moussaoui, who was convicted of crimes related to the 9/11 attacks.

In July 2001, he became the assistant special agent in charge of the Minneapolis Division.

In August 2003, Briese returned to the mothership in Washington as a section chief in the Counterterrorism Division. His duties included oversight of half the FBI’s global terrorism operations, including the FBI’s deployment in Iraq and the Saddam Hussein interrogation team.

In January 2005, he headed up the Pittsburgh Division. The following year, he returned to FBI Headquarters and worked in multiple executive positions within the National Security Branch, the FBI said.

He has a law degree from Louisiana State University Law School. He is married and the father of two teenage boys.

Retired ATF Official Bernie La Forest Pens 2nd Book

Bernie La Forest/facebook

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Bernie La Forest, who headed up ATF offices in Kansas City, Detroit, Phoenix and Los Angeles before retiring, has just penned his second suspense novel —  “In The Red Dragon’s Shadow.

The murder mystery is chock full of international intrigue and involves the ATF, Detroit Police, guns, radical Muslims from Iraq, Iran and China and assassinations. It was just released.

La Forest says the story in his latest book “reboots” a few years after the conclusion of his first book “Shadow Partners”, which was released in 2010.

La Forest, a former Detroit cop, retired from ATF in 1998 and then worked as a contractor for the agency on a gun trace project from 2002 to 2007.

The book is available on Amazon.com.

Filmmaker Michael Moore Defends WikiLeaks Founder and Posts $$$

Michael Moore/m.m. website

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Controversial and seldom-at-a-loss-for-words filmmaker Michael Moore is stepping into the fray and defending WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange — and putting up money too.

In a statement posted on his website Tuesday morning, Moore wrote:

“Yesterday, in the Westminster Magistrates Court in London, the lawyers for WikiLeaks co-founder Julian Assange presented to the judge a document from me stating that I have put up $20,000 of my own money to help bail Mr. Assange out of jail.”

“Furthermore, I am publicly offering the assistance of my website, my servers, my domain names and anything else I can do to keep WikiLeaks alive and thriving as it continues its work to expose the crimes that were concocted in secret and carried out in our name and with our tax dollars.

“We were taken to war in Iraq on a lie. Hundreds of thousands are now dead. Just imagine if the men who planned this war crime back in 2002 had had a WikiLeaks to deal with. They might not have been able to pull it off. The only reason they thought they could get away with it was because they had a guaranteed cloak of secrecy. That guarantee has now been ripped from them, and I hope they are never able to operate in secret again.”

Some Congressional lawmakers have called Assange a traitor and a spy and have demanded that he be prosecuted. Attorney Gen. Eric Holder Jr. recently announced that a criminal investigation into the leaks was underway.

To read Moore’s full statement click here.

Fed’s Cases Against Blackwater “Beginning to Fall Apart”, NY Times Reports

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

WASHINGTON — Blackwater Worldwide, the security firm that became a toxic symbol of America in Afghanistan and Iraq, may be getting a bigger break than it ever imagined.

James Risen of the New York Times reports that after nearly four years the federal government’s investigations and prosecutions against the Blackwater Worldwide workers overseas “are beginning to fall apart, burdened by a legal obstacle of the government’s own making.”

The latest example came Monday when the Justice Department announced it would not seek murder charges against Andrew J. Moonen, who is of killing a guard assigned to an Iraqi vice president in 2006, the Times reported.

To read more click here.

NY Times Editorial: A Reminder to the FBI

spy graphicBy The New York Times
Editorial Page

The day after Thanksgiving, 2002, was a slow day in the Pittsburgh office of the F.B.I., so a supervisor sent a special agent to a rally against the threatened war in Iraq to look for any terrorism suspects who might be there, just to ”see what they are doing.”

The peace rally was sponsored by the Thomas Merton Center, which has opposed violence and armed conflict since the days of Vietnam, and consisted largely of people distributing leaflets.

There was not the slightest indication that there were any terrorists there or even the hint of a connection to terrorism. Nonetheless, the agent kept the leafleteers under surveillance and even took pictures.

It sounds like the paranoid approach to dissent of J. Edgar Hoover’s F.B.I., but this and other abuses took place during the Bush administration. A report on the subject by the Justice Department’s inspector general is a reminder of how easily civil liberties can be cast aside during suspicious frenzies, such as that unleashed after the 9/11 terror attacks.

To read more click here.

Book Review: Justice Dept. Atty. Co-Authors Must Read Book on Abu Ghraib

Ross Parker was chief of the criminal division in the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Detroit for 8 years and worked as an AUSA for 28 in that office.

“The Secrets of Abu Ghraib Revealed—American Soldiers on Trial” by Christopher Graveline and Michael Clemens. The book is available at Amazon.com, barnesandnoble.com and Borders.

abu ghraib book

By Ross Parker
ticklethewire.com

An acquaintance from another country recently posed a question to me: How is it that such an idealistic country as America, whose people are willing to sacrifice so much, is so mistrusted and vilified around the world? We contribute nearly a trillion dollars a year, more than ten times the amount of any other country, as well as the lives of thousands of our best and brightest to attempt to keep world peace. But in the international press and the streets of the Middle East we are, increasingly, the Great Satan.

Historians for my children’s children may be able to explain this complex irony. Hopefully, one of the texts they will study is The Secrets of Abu Ghraib Revealed by Christopher Graveline and Michael Clemens. The book presents a day-by-day factual account of one of the scandals of the Iraq War, one which scarred the image of America in a part of the world where we can ill afford such ignominy.

Graveline, now an assistant U.S. Attorney in Detroit, who was  a JAG prosecutor, and Clemens, a federal agent in Milwaukee, who was an Army investigator, were intimately involved in the eleven successful prosecutions of the military personnel who abused Iraqi detainees at the Baghdad prison in November and December of 2003. The authors present the facts with such detail and objectivity that readers can come to their own conclusions about the questions of cause, blame and responsibility.

In addition to using impeccable scholarship, the book explores the human dimensions of the tragedy and presents the reader with a fascinating and dramatic description of the people and scenes involved.

The heat, dust and danger of Baghdad, as well as the drama of the courtroom, are alive in its pages to keep the reader as engrossed as any good summer beach-read. Beyond the enjoyment of the read, the book presents a study of the rule of law and the rules of war, for generals and taxpayers, Presidents and policymakers, about the complexities of investing young American lives in trouble spots around the world. Its drama and message will appeal to a broad spectrum of readers.

Read more »

Man Pleads to Bribing Iraqi Officials in Oil Contracts

iStock_000006637909XSmallBy Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

A man with Canadian-Lebanese dual citizenship pleaded guilty Friday to participating in an eight-year conspiracy to defraud the United Nations Oil for Food Program and bribing Iraqi officials in connection with the sale of a chemical additive used in the refining of leaded fuel, the Justice Department announced.

Ousama Naaman, 61, of Abu Dhabi, was arrested July 30, 2009, in Frankfurt and extradited to the United States, the Justice Department said. He pleaded guilty to charges including violating the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act.

From 2001 to 2003, acting on behalf of the company Innospec, Naaman paid 10 percent kickbacks to the then Iraqi government in exchange for five contracts, the Justice Department said.

Authorities said Naaman negotiated the contracts, which included a 10 percent price increase to cover the kickbacks, and routed the funds to Iraqi government accounts in the Middle East.

He also admitted that from 2004 to 2008 he paid more than $3 million worth of bribes in cash, travel, gifts, and entertainment, to officials of the Iraqi Ministry of Oil and the Trade Bank of Iraq to secure sales of tetraethyl lead in Iraq, as well as to secure “more favorable exchange rates on the contracts.” the Justice Department said. Naaman faces up to 10 years in prison.

Saudi Man Gets 4 Years and 3 Months for Selling Counterfeit Computer Parts to U.S. Marines

logo_ciscoBy Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

A Saudi citizen residing in Texas was hit with a prison sentence of 4 years and 3 months in Houston on Thursday for selling counterfeit computer parts to the military in Iraq that “could have put our men and woman in uniform at risk”, said U.S. Attorney Jose Angel Moreno.

Authorities said parts sold by the Saudi citizen Ehab Ali Ashoor, 49, were intended to be used by the U.S. Marine Corps for a computer network that transmitted troop movements, relayed intelligence and maintained the security at Al Taaddum, a Marine base just west of Fallujah in Iraq.

Read more »