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Tag: Indianapolis

Herbert Stapleton Named Special Agent in Charge of FBI’s Indianapolis Field Office

FBI’s Indianapolis Field Office. Photo: FBI

By Steve Neavling

Herbert J. Stapleton was tapped to serve as special agent in charge of the FBI’s Indianapolis Field Office. 

Before the appointment, Stapleton was serving as a deputy assistant director of the Cyber Division at FBI headquarters.

Stapleton began working as an FBI special agent in 2004, when he was assigned to the Cape Girardeau Resident Agency under the St. Louis Field Office. He investigated various crimes, including bank robberies, complex financial crimes, public corruption, and child exploitation.

Stapleton transferred to the Chicago Field Office in 2008 to investigate transnational organized crime. 

In 2011, a promotion took Stapleton to the Internet Crime Complaint Center Unit (IC3) under the Cyber Division at headquarters, where he was supervisory special agent. 

In 2014, Stapleton became supervisory special agent at the Cincinnati Field Office. Two years later, he was promoted to assistant special agent in charge in the Cincinnati office, where he oversaw cyber, intelligence, and crisis management programs in southern Ohio.

In 2019, he became section chief in the Cyber Division at headquarters, where he was responsible for cyber-criminal investigations. Last year, Stapleton was promoted to deputy assistant director of the division’s Operational Branch, and he also served as the director of the National Cyber Investigative Joint Task Force.

Before joining the FBI, Stapleton was an attorney. 

He received a bachelor’s degree from Centre College in Kentucky and a law degree from the University of Kentucky.

FBI: FedEx Gunman Not Motivated by Hate. Instead, He Wanted to “Demonstrate His Masculinity’

Brandon Scott Hole

By Steve Neavling

The FBI announced on Wednesday that the Indianapolis gunman who killed eight people at a FedEx facility in April was not motivated by racial bias or ideology. 

At a news conference, the FBI and police called the shooting by Brandon Scott Hole “an act of suicidal murder” inspired by his desire to “demonstrate his masculinity and capability while fulfilling a final desire to experience killing people,” The IndyStar reports.

Hole, who worked at the Fed Ex facility briefly in 2020, planned the shooting for at least nine months, the officials said.  

FBI Indianapolis Special Agent in Charge Paul Keenan said Hole wanted to prove his masculinity after trying to live on his own but failing before moving backing into his old home. In addition, Hole had “almost daily” suicidal thoughts.

“Only the shooter knows all the reasons why he committed this horrific act of violence,” Keenan said. “However, at this time, the FBI is confident that based on the evidence collected, the assessment of the (FBI) Behavioral Analysis Unit is accurate.”

He added that investigators reviewed Hole’s computers, phones and other electronic equipment and found only “an extremely small percentage of overall viewing” of “World War II, Nazi-type propaganda.”

“But there was no indication that there was any animosity towards the Sikh community, or any other group for that matter,” Kennan said.

FBI Investigated Man Who Shot 8 People at Fed Ex Facility

Brandon Scott Hole

By Steve Neavling

The FBI interviewed the 19-year-old man who shot and killed eight people at a FedEx facility in Indianapolis after his mother warned law enforcement in March 2020 that he might try to “commit suicide by cop,” the bureau said. 

Brandon Scott Hole, 19, of Indianapolis, opened fire at a Fed Ex facility late Thursday before turning the gun on himself. 

After authorities received the warning about Hole, a former Fed Ex employee, the Indianapolis Metro Police Department placed him “on an immediate detention mental health temporary hold,” Paul Keenan, the special agent in charge of the FBI’s Indianapolis Field Office, said in a statement. 

Keenan said the FBI joined the investigation after police found a shotgun in Hole’s bedroom. 

“Based on items observed in the suspect’s bedroom at that time, he was interviewed by the FBI in April 2020. No Racially Motivated Violent Extremism (RMVE) ideology was identified during the course of the assessment and no criminal violation was found,” Keenan said in the statement. “The shotgun was not returned to the suspect.”

Nevertheless, Hole legally purchased the two assault rifles he used in the attack several months after the FBI investigated him. 

Operation Legend Nets 3,500+ Arrests in Nine Cities Since It Launched in July

By Steve Neavling

ticklethewire.com

More than 3,500 people have been arrested across nine cities as part of “Operation Legend,” an anti-crime initiative launched by the Justice Department in July, Attorney General William Barr announced Tuesday.

Since the operation began on July 8, federal authorities and their local partners have arrested about 200 murder suspects and seized roughly 1,000 firearms, 19 kilos of heroin, 11 kilos of fentanyl, 94 kilos of methamphetamine, 14 kilos of cocaine, and $6.5 million in drug money, Barr said at a news conference in Milwaukee.

Of those arrested, about 815 have been charged with federal offenses, 440 with firearms offenses, and 300 with drug-related crimes.

The operation involves more than 1,000 agents from the ATF, DEA, and FBI, along with the U.S. Marshals Service, in nine cities: Chicago, Albuquerque, Cleveland, Detroit, Milwaukee, St. Louis, Memphis, Kansas City and Indianapolis. The operation is named in honor of LeGend Taliferro, a 4-year-old boy who was fatally shot while he was sleeping in the morning of June 29 in Kansas City.

To see a breakdown by city, click here.

‘Operation Legend’ Leads to Nearly 1,500 Arrests in 8 U.S. Cities, Barr Announces

Attorney General William Barr, via Justice Department.

By Steve Neavling

ticklethewire.com

Nearly 1,500 people have been arrested across eight cities as part of “Operation Legend,” an anti-crime initiative recently launched by the Justice Department, Attorney General William Barr announced Wednesday.

Since the operation began on July 8, about 217 of those arrests involved federal crimes, most of them drug- and gun-related. ATF agents also seized nearly 400 firearms, Barr said.

“In just a few short weeks, federal investigators working side-by-side with state and local law enforcement have begun to make significant progress towards reducing violence related to illegal firearms, drug trafficking and other crime in our neighborhoods,” U.S. Attorney Justin Herdman said in a news release. “In Cleveland, Operation Legend’s law enforcement operations have already resulted in 32 defendants charged federally with various drug trafficking and firearms violations. These early results show the potential that Operation Legend has to make our cities and communities a safer place for everyone to live.”

The operation involves more than 1,000 agents from the ATF, DEA, and FBI, along with the U.S. Marshals Service, in eight cities: Chicago, Albuquerque, Cleveland, Detroit, Milwaukee, St. Louis, Memphis and Indianapolis. The operation is named in honor of LeGend Taliferro, a 4-year-old boy who was fatally shot while he was sleeping in the morning of June 29 in Kansas City.

Click here for a breakdown of arrests by city.

Wayne G. Davis, One of the FBI’s First Black Agents, Dies at Age 81

Wayne G. Davis

By Steve Neavling

ticklethewire.com

Wayne G. Davis, a 25-year veteran of the FBI who served as special agent in charge of the Detroit, Indianapolis and Philadelphia field offices, died earlier this month.

Davis was 81.

Davis began his career with the bureau in 1963 after becoming one of the first African Americans to graduate from the FBI Academy. His first assignments were in Detroit, Newark and Washington, The Philadelphia Inquirer reports.

After leading the Indianapolis office for two years, Davis became the first Black person to serve as special agent in charge of the Detroit office in 1981.

In 1985, Davis was appointed to head the Philadelphia office.

“Wayne’s promotions to special agent in charge of the Detroit and Philadelphia offices made him one of the highest-ranking Black agents in a well-earned position of authority in the FBI,” Jerri Williams, who served as Davis’ media specialist in Philadelphia, wrote in a tribute. “Considering the times we are living in today, with tensions between the Black community and law enforcement, Wayne Davis’ life and career is something we can all celebrate.”

Davis was born in New York City, where he attended public school before earning a bachelor of science degree in business administration from the University of Connecticut in 1960.

He is survived by his wife, Lois, and his daughters Adrienne and Cheryl, two grandchildren, and a brother.

Paul Keenan Named Special Agent in Charge of Indianapolis Field Office

Paul Keenan, special agent in charge of the Indianapolis Field Office.

By Steve Neavling

ticklethewire.com

Paul Keenan, who was serving as a section chief for the Critical Incident Response Group (CIRG), has been named special agent in charge of the Indianapolis Field Office.

Keenan’s career with the FBI began in 2003, investigating violent gangs out of the Los Angeles Field Office. In 2009, Keenan took charge of the Violent Gang Squad and later the High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area Squad investigating Mexican drug cartels.

In 2012, Keenan became the assistant legal attaché in Panama City, representing the bureau in Panama, Costa Rica, and Nicaragua. He helped capture two of the FBI’s Ten Most Wanted fugitives.

In 2014, Keenan began serving in the Knoxville Field Office in Tennessee as the supervisory senior special agent of the Chattanooga Resident Agency. While there, he led the investigation into a homegrown violent extremist attack on two military installations.

In 2016, Keenan became the assistant special agent in charge of the Operational Support Branch of the Miami Field Office, which included all specialty teams, the Computer Analysis Response Team, media operations, and several other programs.

In 2017, Keenan became ASAC of one of Miami’s criminal branches, where he led investigations of the mass shootings at the Fort Lauderdale airport and at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School.

In 2018, Keenan was named chief of the Investigative and Operations Support Section in CIRG, where he led the National Center for the Analysis of Violent Crime. In addition, he served as an acting deputy assistant director at CIRG.

Before coming to the FBI, Mr. Keenan was a special agent with the DEA. He holds a B.A. in political science from Indiana University.

Gangster John Dillinger’s Body May Rest in Peace After Nephew Drops Suit to Exhume Body

Gangster John Dillinger, via FBI.

By Steve Neavling

ticklethewire.com

It appears the fight over exhuming John Dillinger’s gravesite is over.

Michael Thompson, the nephew of the 1930s American gangster, has withdrawn his lawsuit seeking permission from an Indianapolis cemetery to exhume Dillinger’s gravesite to determine if he’s actually buried there, RTV-6 reports.

Thompson believes he may have evidence that his bank-robbing uncle was not fatally shot by the FBI at a theater in Chicago in 1934. The FBI disputes those claims as fantasy.

Thompson’s plans were thwarted by Crown Hill Cemetery, which refused to give him permission to exhume the body.

Marion County Superior Court Judge Timothy Oakes dismissed the lawsuit in December, saying state law requires a cemetery’s consent to exhume a body.

“The limited question before the Court today is whether disinterment may occur under this section of the statute without cemetery approval. Court finds that the statutory requirements for this section of the statute are clear in that disinterment requires the cemetery owner to give consent before disinterment may occur,” Oakes wrote.

The judge, however, gave Thompson an opportunity to amend the suit, but he has not.

Crown Hill Cemetery released the following statement:

Crown Hill objects to the exhumation of John Dillinger. We have a duty to the families we serve to ensure the safety and integrity of the Cemetery which is threatened by the proposed exhumation. We also have concerns that the complex and commercial nature of this exhumation could cause disruption to the peaceful tranquility of the Cemetery and those who are visiting to remember their loved ones. Additionally, we received notice that not all of Mr. Dillinger’s next of kin agree with the exhumation. We honor the trust placed in us to protect all individuals in our care, and to protect the interests of those who cannot speak for themselves.