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Tag: Homeland Security

West Virginia Homeland Security Officer Critically Shot at Home Near Charleston

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The training coordinator for the West Virginia Division of Homeland Security was shot in the chest and was in critical condition as of late Monday, the West Virginia Gazette reports.

Frank Kennedy was found at his home near Charleston where he apparently shot himself intentionally.

Kennedy underwent surgery Sunday night and remained in critical condition, hospital officials said.

State Homeland Security Director Jimmy Gianato said he couldn’t confirm whether the shooting was intentional.

“At this point he’s in the hospital,” Gianato told the Gazette. “The last we heard he was in the ICU.”

 OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST

Homeland Security Remains without a Leader As Authorities Struggle to Find Nominee

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

With Janet Napolitano out, Homeland Security is without a nomination for a new chief.

Maybe that’s because it’s a thankless job that can spoil a reputation, the Washington Post reports.

“It’s a high-risk job,” one observer told the Post. “If something happens on your watch, you’re done.”

 

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST

Federal Government Can’t Cut Most Homeland Security Employees

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A vast majority of Homeland Security employees cannot be forced off the job because of a government shutdown, the Washington Post reports.

About 86% of the department’s 231,000 employees are considered “essential,” which means they must remain on the job for the “safety of human life or protection of property,” regardless of budget conditions.

One of the most protected components of DHS is the Transportation Security Administration, where 93% of employees are considered essential.

Former Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano Takes Over as UC President

Janet Napolitano

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Former Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano took over as the president of the University of California on Monday, but she’s already facing challenges.

A group of student activists are asking for a “no-confidence” vote to express disapproval over her hiring, the Associated Press reports.

The activists said Napolitano is a bad choice because she’ll be overseeing a campus where protests and residents living in the U.S. illegally are going school, the AP wrote.

“There are a lot of students with some very large concerns centered around her past history in Homeland Security,” University of California Student Association President Kareem Aref said. “Students are concerned that her presidency may be accompanied by a militarization of the UC.”

Off-Duty Homeland Security Agent Arrested For Shooting at Car During Road Rage Incident

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

An off-duty Homeland Security agent is accused of shooting at a car with a 2-year-old child on it during a road-rage incident in Boca Raton, NBC Miami reports.

Police disclosed the Sept. 7 arrest on Thursday, saying Angel Echevarria, 40, claimed he pulled out the gun in an attempt to shoot out a tire after a Toyota struck him and his wife.

The officer at the scene indicated Echevarria did not have a justifiable reason to discharge his gun, NBC reported.

Inside the other car were Alla Juma, 27, Mahde Juma, 18, and a 2-year-old child.

Column: Homeland Security Exposes Constitutional Loop Hole to Conduct Searches

Dale McFeatters
The Eagle-Tribune

The Founding Fathers valued privacy enough to specify in the Fourth Amendment that the people had the right to be secure against unreasonable searches and seizures unless a warrant was issued.

Among other items, they specified “papers.” In a rare moment of shortsightedness, they failed to specify laptops, cellphones and thumb drives. The feds, if they had any clue that these electronic devices might contain incriminating information, could of course go to court and obtain a warrant.

But the Department of Homeland Security has found a way around that constitutional technicality, as in the recent case of David House, who came to the feds’ attention for having raised funds for the defense of secrets-leaker Chelsea Manning, formerly Pfc. Bradley Manning. No telling what secrets House may have had, but it apparently wasn’t worth the hassle of going to court to find out.

Instead, according to the Associated Press: “U.S. agents quietly waited for months for House to leave the country, then seized his laptop, thumb drive, digital camera and cellphone when he re-entered the United States. They held his laptop for weeks before returning it, acknowledging one year later that House had committed no crime and promising to destroy copies the government made of House’s personal data.”

To read more click here.

Homeland Security Tests Robotic Fish Designed to Sniff Out Contraband

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

It’s a like a drone for the ocean.

Homeland Security is testing a six-foot-long robotic fish that is designed to find contraband in a ship’s hull, The Rancher reports.

Equipped with sophisticated sensors, the BIOSwimmer is shaped like a tuna and highly maneuverable.

Serving as the launching ground for the robotic fish is a century-old battleship that saw two World Wars, The Rancher wrote.

“Texas Parks and Wildlife is pleased to make the Battleship TEXAS available to serve the nation in the interests of strengthening port security,” says Andy Smith, TPWD’s ship manager. “The tests underway this week will be instructive in the Department of Homeland Security’s efforts to refine this innovative technology so it may be deployed to make our maritime environment safer. The Battleship TEXAS is showing us that you’re never too old to be of service to your country.”

Senate Panel Explores Effectiveness of Homeland Security Department on Sept. 11 Anniversary

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

How prepared is Homeland Security to handle terrorism threats?

On the 12th anniversary of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, a Senate panel will ask that question as it examines the department and interviews former lawmakers and past DHS officials, including the first Homeland Security secretary, Tom Ridge, the Washington Post reports.

The panel plans to review issues ranging from cybersecurity to disaster preparedness.

DHS was created by President Bush and Congress in 2003 in response to the Sept. 11, 2011, terrorist attacks.