Links

Columnists



Site Search


Entire (RSS)
Comments (RSS)

Archive Calendar

September 2021
S M T W T F S
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
2627282930  

Guides

How to Become a Bounty Hunter



Tag: Heroin

Twin Brothers Plead Guilty to Bribing Cops in an FBI Sting

washington-dc-map2By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

WASHINGTON — Twin brothers pleaded guilty Monday in federal court in Washington to trying to bribe two D.C. police officers to get a heroin case dismissed in the city court.

Larry and Garry Moody, 39, both of Washington, who ended up being busted in an FBI sting, are set to be sentenced Jan. 11.

Authorities said Larry Moody was arrested in February 2009 after an undercover cop saw him preparing to sell heroin to two men in Southeast Washington.

Afterwards, Larry and his brother Gary approached two D.C. cops to see if they would help get the criminal charges dropped, authorities said.

The two cops went to the FBI, which set up a sting with the officers. On March 5, 2009, one of the undercover police officers met with Garry Moody at a restaurant in Northwest Washington and Moody paid the officer $8,000.

More Potent Cheaper Heroin Contributing to Spike in Overdoses, AP Reports

black tar heroin

black tar heroin

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

WASHINGTON — A super-potent heroin being sold by Mexican traffickers is contributing to a spike in overdoses across America, an Associated Press study shows.

AP reports that the heroin, known as “black tar” heroin because of its dark gooey texture — and other forms are causing problems and selling for as little as $10 a bag.

“We found people who snorted it lying face-down with the straw lying next to them,” Patrick O’Neil, coroner in suburban Chicago’s Will County, where annual heroin deaths have nearly tripled – from 10 to 29 – since 2006, told the Associated Press. “It’s so potent that we occasionally find the needle in the arm at the death scene.”

The potency has also enabled people to snort or smoke it and avoid the needle, AP reported.

“That has opened up heroin to a whole different group of users,” Harry Sommers, who heads the DEA in St. Louis told AP.

To read more click here.

Actor Michael Douglas’ Son Messes Up Again After DEA Bust

Michael Douglas
Michael Douglas

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com
Actor Michael Douglas’ son Cameron, who was busted last month by the DEA on charges of drug trafficking, has messed up again.

The New York Post, attributing reports to law enforcement sources, said that Cameron Douglas, 30, who was under house arrest, was taken on Wednesday “from his posh pad that belongs to his mom, Diandra Douglas, and brought to the Metropolitan Correctional Center” in New York after his girlfriend was busted for bringing him an electric toothbrush stuffed with 19 tiny bags of heroin in the battery compartment.

Wire service reports said that the DEA arrrested the girlfriend Kelly Sott and found heroin, crystal meth and marijuana in her room.

A federal magistrate ordered that she be held without bail and get treatment for heroin addiction.

The New York Post reported that Michael Douglas issued a statement saying “the family is devastated and very disappointed.”

Court records show his criminal complaint remains under seal.

N.Y. DEA and Locals Bust Heroin Ring that Hid Drugs in Toy Bears

heroin stuffed in teddy bear/dea photo
heroin stuffed in teddy bear/dea photo

Agents have seen it all when it comes to hiding drugs like heroin. Here’s the latest hide-and-seek game where the dealers lost.

BY Samuel Goldsmith
New York DAILY NEWS
NEW YORK –– They don’t stock this option at your local Build-A-Bear store.

Authorities announced Saturday a massive heroin bust in the Bronx, where dealers were moving millions of dollars in dope inside Build-A-Bear dolls.

The drugs were packaged in tiny glassine bags branded with names like Barack Obama, Swine Flu and Crime 360, a nod to a detective series on A&E.

“The agents walk in and there’s heroin and all the dime bags and the Build-A-Bears just sitting there,” said Erin Mulvey, spokesman for the Drug Enforcement Administration.

State, local and federal law enforcement officers seized 33 pounds of heroin with a street value of about $33 million and arrested 12 people on Friday. The suspects were waiting to be arraigned late Saturday.

For Full Story

Tangled Tale of How Private Spy Firm Helped the Feds Bust An Afghan Heroin Trafficker and Got Screwed

Well, as the old addage goes, No Good Deed Goes Unpunished. In this case, the spy firm, Rosetta Research and Consulting, helped the feds make their case, then got screwed.

Feds Hold Press Conference in 2005 After Arrest of Noorza/dea photo

Feds Hold Press Conference in 2005 After Arrest of Noorza/dea photo

By Richard Leiby
Washington Post Staff Writer
WASHINGTON — After a federal jury in New York swiftly convicted a major Afghan heroin trafficker and Taliban supporter named Haji Bashir Noorzai, the government promptly issued the usual celebratory news release thanking the men and women of the DEA and FBI for their “countless sacrifices” in making the case.
Left out was any credit to the party most responsible for the government’s victory: an unusual three-man private intelligence firm called Rosetta Research and Consulting.
At the instigation of the Drug Enforcement Administration, Rosetta agents lured Noorzai to America and delivered him right into the feds’ hands. He spent 11 days in an Embassy Suites Hotel in Manhattan in 2005, enjoying room service and considering himself a guest of the U.S. government — until he was arrested. He was imprisoned for three years awaiting his trial, which concluded in September. He faces up to life in prison when he is sentenced in January.
For Full Story

D.C. U.S. Magistrate Judge’s Son Pleads Guilty to Being Armed Heroin Dealer

U.S. Magistrate Judge Deborah A. Robinson probably had a little more compassion than usual on Wednesday for a defendant: Her son.

Philip Winkfield/ baltimore police photo courtesy of baltimore city paper

Philip Winkfield/ baltimore police photo courtesy of baltimore city paper

By Van Smith
Baltimore City Paper
BALTIMORE — U.S. District Court magistrate judge Deborah A. Robinson normally presides over matters in her Washington, D.C., courtroom. But on Dec. 3 she sat in the gallery of a federal courtroom in Baltimore to witness her 21-year-old son, Philip Winkfield, admit to being an armed heroin dealer.
Winkfield was a Morgan State University student last April, living in Dutch Village in Northeast Baltimore, when a raid team served a warrant at his apartment and found him with five loaded guns (including an assault rifle), a bullet-proof vest, a digital scale, a drug ledger, cutting agent, and a bunch of heroin, cocaine, and pot.
Despite the broad array of evidence, on Wednesday Winkfield copped only to dealing heroin and to the fact “that one or more of the firearms was used in furtherance of the crime,” according to the plea agreement. “This is not a cooperation agreement,” said U.S. District Court judge J. Frederick Motz after accepting Winkfield’s plea deal, which had been hammered out by prosecutor George Jarrod Hazel and Winkfield’s attorneys, Gregg Bernstein and Robert Mance.
For Full Story