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Tag: Gulf Cartel

Gunmen Accused in Fatal Shooting of Off-Duty Border Patrol Agent Suspected of Crime Spree

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Two gunmen accused of murdering an off-duty Border Patrol agent in front of his family during a fishing trip in Texas are expected to soon be charged in connection with a series of robberies and carjackings at secluded fishing spots in Cameron County, Fox News reports.

The man are believed to be tied to the Gulf Cartel.

Gustavo Tijerina, 30, and Ismael Hernandez, 40, were charged Tuesday in the murder of Javier Vega Jr. in Willacy County. They also were charged with the attempted murder of Vega’s father, who was shot in the hip.

Border Patrol released this statement on Wednesday:

“Words cannot express our sorrow for the loss of our brother, when we lose one of our own, it feels as if we’ve lost a beloved member of our own family,” said Chief Patrol Agent Kevin Oaks. “I wish to express to his family and friends my deepest condolences. May the peace that comes from the memories of the time you shared together, comfort you now and in the difficult days ahead.

“Prior to joining the Border Patrol, Agent Vega served his country as a Marine. His service in the Marine Corps and in the Border Patrol is a true testament to the type of man he was. His character, work ethic and desire to help others are commendable. His death is not only a loss for RGV Sector and the U.S. Border Patrol, but for our entire community.

“The Kingsville Station is at a loss,” said Kingsville Station Acting Patrol Agent in Charge Arnold Perez. “Not only did Javier strive to be the best agent and K-9 handler, but he also made it a point to develop and truly care about his friendships.”

“In the days that have followed this devastating loss, the impact has been immediate and sorrowful. In the many comments and thoughts expressed by those who knew him best, his family and friends were an obvious priority and focus in his life. His co-workers say he was a good man, devoted to his family, particularly his wife, Paola, and sons, Javier Vega III, Jiovanni, and Jarod. He was a beloved son and brother, and had a passion for life.”

Guilty Verdicts Returned for Mexican Cartel Affiliates

By Danny Fenster
ticklethewire.com

Things did not go the way Gerardo Castillo-Chavez and Armado Garcia had hoped in Laredo, Texas, on Wednesday.

Both men saw guilty verdicts returned on all charges against them, U.S. Attorney Kenneth Magidson announced. Castillo-Chavez, a 25-year-old from Tamaulipas, Mexico, was convicted of “conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute controlled substances, interstate travel in aid of racketeering (ITAR) and possession of a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime or a crime of violence,” according to the Justice Department.

The guilty verdicts were returned unanimously after a four-day trial and six-hours of deliberation.

A Feb. 17, 2010 indictment charged Castillo-Chavez and 33 other individuals with 47 counts of conspiracy to kidnap and murder U.S. citizens in a foreign country, drug conspiracy, kidnapping conspiracy, firearms conspiracy, money laundering conspiracy, use of juveniles to commit a violent crime, accessory after the fact and solicitation as well as substantive money laundering, drug trafficking and ITAR charges, according to the Justice Department. To date, 14 of those charged have been convicted.

Several witnesses in the trial tied Castillo-Chavez to the Gulf Cartel and the Zetas, and implicated Castillo-Chavez, also known as “Cachetes,” in a double murder on April 2, 2006, as well as other attempted murders a violent attacks in Mexico.

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High-Ranking Gulf Cartel Member Extradited to US

By Danny Fenster
ticklethewire.com

Those keeping score can add yet another extradition from Mexico in the fight against the violent drug trade.

This time it’s Aurelio “Yayo” Cano-Flores, of the Mexican Gulf Cartel, also know as “Yankee.” Cano-Flores has been in the custody of Mexican authorities since a June 10, 2009 arrest, and was extradited August 19, authorities said. He remains in federal custody pending trial.

The 39-year-old drug trafficker appeared before U.S. Magistrate Judge John M. Facciola in D.C. on Monday.

He is charged with “conspiracy to manufacture and distribute five kilograms or more of cocaine and 1,000 kilograms or more of marijuana for importation into the United States,” according to a Justice Department press release.

“Cano-Flores was allegedly responsible for ensuring that multi-ton quantities of cocaine, heroin and marijuana were shipped into the United States, and that the illegal drug proceeds were subsequently funneled back into Mexico,” said Assistant Attorney General Lanny A. Breuer in a statement.

Breuer said Cano-Flores was responsible for the Gulf Cartel’s operations in Camargo, Mexico, a colonial town in the east of the state of Chihuahua, and other proximate stretches of the US-Mexico border.

The indictment alleges that Cano-Flores and other defendants used radio communications and Nextel “push-to-talk” phones to evade law enforcement and kept detailed records of shipments, payrolls to traffickers and law enforcement, drug boss identities, and more on laptops and flash drives.

The Justice Department said Cano-Flores worked with partner cartel “Los Zetas” to oversee motor vehicle shipments of marijuana and cocaine into Texas, and from there across the United States, and carried out violent acts against law enforcement and competing traffickers.

The investigation was led by the DEA’s Houston Field Division and the DEA Bilateral Investigation Unit.

Feds Indict Leaders of Mexico’s Gulf Cartel

This is a big indictment which targets some major players. But the money is too good and the smaller fish will only step up to the plate to grab it. The question is: How do you stop that from happening?

mexico-border-sign

By Richard Marosi
Los Angeles Times

Federal authorities announced indictments Monday against the reputed leaders of Mexico’s Gulf cartel and its paramilitary force, the Zetas, accusing them of trafficking tons of cocaine and marijuana from South America through the Texas-Mexico border.

Three of the men are identified as the “triumvirate” that manages the far-flung enterprise, dividing its territories among themselves. Another reputed leader, Miguel Angel Treviño Morales, allegedly controls the Mexican border city of Nuevo Laredo, where the cartel is believed to funnel large amounts of drugs through the busy truck crossing into Laredo, Texas.

Fifteen more alleged cartel lieutenants were charged in the pair of indictments filed in New York and Washington, D.C. The Washington indictment was filed in June but not announced until Monday.

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