Links

Columnists



Site Search


Entire (RSS)
Comments (RSS)

Archive Calendar

October 2021
S M T W T F S
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31  

Guides

How to Become a Bounty Hunter



Tag: grenade

Grenade Sought by ATF Exploded, Killed Teen in North Carolina

Grenade sold in North Carolina, via ATF.

By Steve Neavling

The ATF made an urgent public plea in late December for help tracking down a hand grenades that were “thought to be inert” after they were sold to unsuspecting customers at an antique mall in North Carolina. 

Unfortunately the ATF wasn’t able to locate one of the grenades before it exploded and killed a Virginia teenager two days before Christmas.

The grenade were sold at the Fancy Flea Antique Mall in Shallotte. 

The store owners thought the grenade was a dud, the ATF said in a news release. The ATF is asking for the public’s help tracking down the other grenades. 

“The grenades were thought to be ‘inert’ MK2 grenades, a style used during World War II,” the ATF said. “At the time of sale, neither the vendor nor buyer(s) believed the grenades to be functioning or hazardous.”

ATF Searches for Grenade That Could Still Explode After Being Sold at Antique Mall

Grenade sold in North Carolina, via ATF.

By Steve Neavling

The ATF is asking for the public’s help tracking down a grenade that was “thought to be inert” but could still explode after it was sold to an unsuspecting customer at an antique mall in North Carolina.

The grenade was purchased from the Fancy Flea Antique Mall in Ocean Isle Beach on June 13, and it appears the customer believed the grenade was just a decoration. 

“The grenade, thought to be inert, may contain materials that could degrade [and] explode,” the ATF statement said.

Anyone with information on the potential whereabouts of the grenade is asked to call ATF at 704-716-1800. 

The ATF had a similar scare in Durham, N.C., in December 2019, when a thrift store was evacuated after a live grenade was found inside a dresser that had been donated. No one was injured. 

TSA Shocked After Discovering Children with Grenade, Hatchet at Florida Airports

Recovered objects/TSA

Recovered objects/TSA

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

It would have been a shocking discovery no matter who was found trying to carry the potential weapons onto airplanes at two Florida airports.

But the TSA was especially surprised when they found a 12-year-old with a grenade inside a carry-on at Jacksonville International Airport earlier this week, Bay News 9 reports. 

Then on Wednesday, security found a 16-year-old with a hatchet at Orlando International Airport.

“Hatchets, knives, grenades and guns are not permitted in your carry-on bags,” said TSA spokeswoman Sari Koshetz.

Authorities later determined that the grenade was “inert and not dangerous,” Bay News 9 wrote.

Other Stories of Interest

Book: Johnny Carson Helped FBI Arrest Man Who Made Threats with a Grenade

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

We knew Johnny Carson was a comedian? But a brazen cowboy?

In the mid-1970s, Carson found a live grenade with a threat demanding $250,000 in cash. If he didn’t deliver it, a note read, his family would be harmed, Showbizz 44 reports.

So with the help of the FBI, Carson, who carried his .38 revolver with him, delivered the money – “cut up paper stacked and wrapped in 125 bill sized bundles,” according to the recently published book, “Johnny Carson.”

The FBI arrested 26-year German national and his wife. Ended up the grenade wasn’t real.

Wounded Army Veteran Justin Slaby Awarded $75,000 in Damages for Lawsuit Against FBI

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

A U.S. Army veteran who sued the FBI after saying the bureau removed him from a training academy because of his prosthetic left hand was awarded $75,000 in damages Wednesday, the Washington Post reports.

The federal jury in Alexandria determined Justin Slaby, whose hand was blown off by a grenade during a military training accident in 2004, was capable of performing his duties in spite of his disability.

Slaby’s attorney said his client plans to still become a special agent.

“It’s a historical case,” said John Griffin, one of the lawyers who represented Slaby. “A jury has now spoken and said people should be evaluated on their abilities and not on their appearances and not on what happened to them during a war.”

Justin Slaby