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Tag: fentanyl

New Haven Man Accused of Crashing into DEA Agents, Injuring Them During Surveillance Operation

By Steve Neavling

A New Haven man accused of crashing a minivan into a car carrying DEA special agents was indicted on charges of distributing fentanyl and crack cocaine, the Justice Department announced Thursday. 

Dereck Brock, 36, was under surveillance by the DEA’s New Haven Task Force and New Haven Police Department at 5:20 a.m. on Jan. 10 when he was suspected of distributing narcotics. 

When a law enforcement vehicle tried to stop Brock’s vehicle, he allegedly fled at a high-rate of speed through stop sticks that deflated the minivan’s tires before he crashed head-on with the vehicle carrying two DEA agents. 

Brock and the two agents were injured and taken to a hospital. 

The injuries were non-life-threatening. 

Brock faces up to 20 years in prison on one count of possession with intent to distribute fentanyl and crack cocaine. 

Brock remained in custody as of Thursday. 

TSA Reveals Top 10 Most Bizarre Findings at Airport Checkpoints

Cattle prod inside a guitar case at Washington Dulles International Airport. Photo via TSA

By Steve Neavling

From a cattle prod in a guitar case to an inert grenade, the TSA revealed its 10 most unusual findings at airport checkpoints in 2022.

The list is revealed in a video, which counts down to the No. 1 strangest item – fentanyl inside candy wrappers, and each is accompanied with a clever clip. 

Most of the bizarre discoveries were weapons hidden inside everyday items. One was a knife in a laptop, and others were guns hidden in a Play Station, an arm sling, a jar of peanut butter, and even a raw chicken. 

Check out the video here:

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DEA Seized Massive Amounts of Fentanyl in 2022

Rainbow fentanyl pills seized by the DEA. Photo via DEA.

By Steve Neavling

The DEA seized more than 379 million deadly doses of fentanyl this year, enough to kill every American. 

The DEA revealed Wednesday that it had seized 50.6 million fentanyl-laced bills and 10,000 pounds of the synthetic opioid powder, ABC reports

“These seizures – enough deadly doses of fentanyl to kill every American – reflect the DEA’s unwavering commitment to protect Americans and save lives, by tenaciously pursuing those responsible for the trafficking of fentanyl across the United States,” DEA Administrator Anne Milgram said in a statement.

The seizures come at a time when overdoses are reaching alarming levels.  

CBP also announced a record amount of fentanyl was seized at the U.S.-Mexico border in fiscal year 2022. 

In April, the DEA warned of an alarming increase in fentanyl deaths. In the 12-month period ending in October 2021, more than 105,000 Americans died of drug overdoses, and 66% of those deaths were from synthetic opioids such as fentanyl, according to the CDC. More Americans are dying from fentanyl overdoses than gun- and auto-related deaths combined. 

Border Patrol Announces Largest Seizure of Liquid Fentanyl in U.S. History

Border Patrol agents find record amount of liquid fentanyl. Photo via Twitter.

By Steve Neavling

Border Patrol agents seized the “largest” amount of liquid fentanyl in U.S. history, officials said Friday. 

Chief Patrol Agent Gloria I. Chavez of the Rio Grande Valley Sector made the announcement on Twitter. 

“Fentanyl Bust!!! Extremely proud of our #USBP agents & @NuecesCoSo [Nueces County Sheriff’s Office] authorities who worked together, interdicted, & seized largest amount of liquid #fentanyl in the history of the #USA from a traffic stop in Robstown, Texas,” Chavez tweeted.

https://twitter.com/USBPChiefRGV/status/1598814215132909569

About 25 pounds – or three gallons – of liquid fentanyl was found in a compartment inside a gas tank. That’s enough fentanyl to kill 5.7 million people, Chavez said. 

The fentanyl’s value was $1.8 million.   

CBP announced a record amount of fentanyl was seized at the U.S.-Mexico border in fiscal year 2022. 

The seizures come at a time when overdoses are reaching alarming levels. 

In April, the Drug Enforcement Administration warned of an alarming increase in fentanyl deaths. In the 12-month period ending in October 2021, more than 105,000 Americans died of drug overdoses, and 66% of those deaths were from synthetic opioids such as fentanyl, according to the CDC. More Americans are dying from fentanyl overdoses than gun- and auto-related deaths combined. 

DEA’s St. Louis Division Seizes Record Amount of Fentanyl As Overdoses Reach Alarming Levels

Rainbow fentanyl pills seized by the DEA. Photo via DEA.

By Steve Neavling

The DEA’s St. Louis Division seized a record amount of fentanyl in fiscal year 2022 – more than eight times the amount confiscated five years ago. 

The division seized 671 pounds in 2022, compared to 396 pounds in 2021, 180 pounds in 2020, 227 pounds in 2019, and 77 pounds in 2018. 

“Looking at this staggering increase in seizures, there is no question that DEA and its local, state and federal partners have stepped up our efforts to stop fentanyl from reaching our communities,” Special Agent in Charge Michael A. Davis said in a statement Monday. “Unfortunately, the drugs pouring into the Midwest in multiple forms is also a sign that drug trafficking organizations will go to any length to profit from the misery of our citizens. We’ll continue to take down these criminal networks and put out the message that what they’re selling kills.”

CBP announced a record amount of fentanyl was seized at the U.S.-Mexico border in fiscal year 2022. 

The seizures come at a time when overdoses are reaching alarming levels. 

In April, the Drug Enforcement Administration warned of an alarming increase in fentanyl deaths. In the 12-month period ending in October 2021, more than 105,000 Americans died of drug overdoses, and 66% of those deaths were from synthetic opioids such as fentanyl, according to the CDC. More Americans are dying from fentanyl overdoses than gun- and auto-related deaths combined. 

CBP Seizes Alarming Amounts of Fentanyl at U.S.-Mexico Border As Overdoses Continue to Rise

Rainbow fentanyl pills seized by the DEA. Photo via DEA.

By Steve Neavling

A record amount of fentanyl was seized at the U.S.-Mexico border in fiscal year 2022 as overdoses continue to reach alarming levels, according to CBP. 

In the fiscal year that ended on Sept. 30, CBP intercepted more than 14,700 pounds of the synthetic opioid. By comparison, CBP intercepted 11,200 pounds in fiscal year 2021. 

In 2013, when CBP began seizing fentanyl, only 2 pounds were seized. 

The DEA also seized a record amount of fentanyl last year.

Fentanyl seizures and overdoses reached record highs as the DEA tries to crack down on drug cartels that are pushing the drug. 

What makes it even more challenging is that drug users are unwittingly consuming fentanyl, which is being added to street drugs at alarming levels.

In April, the Drug Enforcement Administration warned of an alarming increase in fentanyl deaths. In the 12-month period ending in October 2021, more than 105,000 Americans died of drug overdoses, and 66% of those deaths were from synthetic opioids such as fentanyl, according to the CDC. More Americans are dying from fentanyl overdoses than gun- and auto-related deaths combined. 

“Fentanyl is killing Americans at an unprecedented rate,” DEA Administrator Anne Milgram said in April. “Already this year, numerous mass-overdose deaths have resulted in dozens of overdoses and deaths. Drug traffickers are driving addition, and increasing their profits, by mixing fentanyl with other illicit drugs. Tragically, many overdose victims have no idea they are ingesting deadly fentanyl.” 

DEA, Chinese chemical Manufactures Are Responsible for Deadly Fentanyl Crisis, DEA and DOJ Say

DEA Administrator Anne Milgram. Photo: DEA.

By Steve Neavling

Mexican cartels and Chinese chemical manufactures are to blame for the deadly fentanyl crisis in the U.S., the DEA and Justice Department said this week. 

DEA Administrator Anne Milgram said Tuesday that the Sinaloa Cartel and the Jalisco New Generation Cartel are behind the deadly, synthetic opioids getting across the border.

“These cartels are responsible for virtually all the fentanyl, and they currently dominate the worldwide fentanyl distribution and supply chain. They are sourcing these precursor chemicals from China, that are the building blocks of synthetic and man-made fentanyl,” Milgram said during a Tuesday press conference at DEA headquarters. “They are in charge of the production of the fentanyl that is happening across Mexico. They are operating the transportation networks that are bringing the fentanyl into the United States. They run and oversee the sales of fentanyl on social media and in our cities, our communities, and our towns.”

Milgram said the agency’s “core mission” is to “target those two networks as they operate worldwide, from China to Mexico to the United States.”

Attorney General Merrick Garland pledged to partner with the DEA to combat fentanyl. 

“Every day, thousands of employees and professionals of the Department of Homeland Security, together with professionals across the United States government, including the Justice Department, are working to secure the border,” Garland said Tuesday. “What we’re trying to do at the DEA, as the administrator described, is to take down the cartels that are the cause in the United States, to take down the distributors for the cartels who are working in the United States, and to stop the companies that are providing the precursor chemicals from China.”

DEA Seizes Record Amount of Fentanyl-Laced Pills in California

About 1 million fentanyl-laced pills seized in California. Photo: DEA

By Steve Neavling

The DEA seized about 1 million fake pills laced with fentanyl in Inglewood, Calif., setting a record for the largest seizure of the synthetic opioid in the state’s history. 

Beginning in May, the DEA’s Los Angeles Field Division High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA) Group 48 began investigating a Los Angeles-area drug trafficking organization with suspected links to the Sinaloa Cartel. Agents identified narcotic couriers and stash house managers who were involved. 

The seizure was made while agents executed a search warrant on July 5 at an Inglewood residence. 

The street value of fentanyl was approximately $15 to $20 million, the DEA. 

“This massive seizure disrupted the flow of dangerous amounts of fentanyl into our streets and probably saved many lives,” DEA Special Agent in Charge Bill Bodner said in a statement. “The deceptive marketing coupled with the ease of accessibility makes these small and seemingly innocuous pills a significant threat to the health and safety of all our communities. A staggering number of teens and young adults are unaware that they are ingesting fentanyl in these fake pills and are being poisoned.”

In a letter to local, state and federal law enforcement in April, the DEA warned about a nationwide spike in fentanyl-related mass overdoses.