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Tag: FBI

Paul Keenan, Special Agent in Charge of FBI’s Indianapolis Field Office, Set to Retire

Paul Keenan, special agent in charge of the Indianapolis Field Office.

By Steve Neavling

Paul Keenan, special agent in charge of the FBI’s Indianapolis Field Office, will retire on Nov. 30 after 24 years of service with the bureau. 

Keenan has led the Indianapolis Field Office since June 2020. 

Keenan’s career with the FBI began in 2003, when he investigated violent gangs out of the Los Angeles Field Office. In 2009, Keenan took charge of the Violent Gang Squad and later the High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area Squad, investigating Mexican drug cartels.

In 2012, Keenan became the assistant legal attaché in Panama City, representing the bureau in Panama, Costa Rica, and Nicaragua. While there, he helped capture two of the FBI’s Ten Most Wanted fugitives.

In 2014, Keenan began serving in the Knoxville Field Office in Tennessee as the supervisory senior special agent of the Chattanooga Resident Agency. He led the investigation into a homegrown violent extremist attack on two military installations.

In 2016, Keenan became the assistant special agent in charge of the Operational Support Branch of the Miami Field Office, which included all specialty teams, the Computer Analysis Response Team, media operations, and several other programs.

In 2017, Keenan became ASAC of one of Miami’s criminal branches, where he led investigations of the mass shootings at the Fort Lauderdale airport and at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School.

In 2018, Keenan was named chief of the Investigative and Operations Support Section in CIRG, where he led the National Center for the Analysis of Violent Crime. In addition, he served as an acting deputy assistant director at CIRG.

Before coming to the FBI, Mr. Keenan was a special agent with the DEA. He holds a B.A. in political science from Indiana University.

FBI Special Agent Kerry Inglis Receives Director’s Award for Excellence in Investigation

By Steve Neavling

FBI Special Agent Kerry Inglis of the Indianapolis Field Office received the Director’s Award for Excellence in Investigation for helping take down a drug-trafficking organization. 

Inglis was the case agent on Operation Electric Avenue, which led to a series of raids at two dozen locations in Indianapolis and Phoenix and resulted in the arrests of 25 people, including drug kingpin Richard Grundy III and his organization, the Grundy Crew. 

Grundy, whose drug organization was called the Grundy Crew, was convicted in August 2019 of conspiracy to distribute drugs worth $3.5 million in 2016 and 2017. 

The Grundy Crew distributed more than 400 pounds of methamphetamine and large amount of cocaine, heroin and marijuana. 

Deathbed Statement Revives Search for Jimmy Hoffa’s Body in New Jersey

James R. Hoffa

By Steve Neavling

Here we go again. 

The seemingly endless search for the body of union boss Jimmy Hoffa took FBI agents to a former landfill in New Jersey under the Pulaski Skyway, The New York Times reports.

The search on Oct. 25 and 26 was prompted by a deathbed statement by a man who says he buried Hoffa’s body in a steel drum. 

“F.B.I. personnel from the Newark and Detroit field offices completed the survey and that data is currently being analyzed,” FBI spokeswoman and Special Agent Mara R. Schneider said Thursday. 

Hoffa was last seen outside of a Michigan restaurant in 1975 and was legally dead in 1982. There have been dozens of searches for his body since then. 

Dan Moldea, an investigative reporter who has researched the Hoffa case for decades, said the latest search is “100 percent” credible.

“A very prominent person disappeared from a public place 46 years ago and was never seen again,” Moldea said Thursday. “This case has to be solved.”

The FBI searched the same location in the 1970s but found nothing. 

“They had no idea where to start looking,” Moldea said.

J. Edgar Hover Ordered Bureau to Hide That Witnesses to Malcolm X’s Assassination Were FBI Informants

Former FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover at his desk. Photo: FBI

By Steve Neavling

FBI informants witnessed Malcolm X’s 1965 assassination and were told not to reveal their work with the bureau when talking with police and prosecutors, according to a prosecutor. 

Manhattan District Attorney Cy Vance made the disclosure on Thursday when asking a judge to throw out the convictions of two of the three men convicted in the civil rights murder, The New York Times reports.

“We now have reports revealing that on orders from director J. Edgar Hoover himself, the F.B.I. ordered multiple witnesses not to tell police or prosecutors that they were in fact F.B.I. informants,” Vance said in court.

Based on the prosecutor’s motion to vacate the convictions, Judge Ellen Biben exonerated Muhammad A. Aziz, 83, and Khalil Islam, who died in 2009. Thomas Hagan, who also was convicted in the murder, confessed to the killing during his trial but was adamant that the two other men were not involved. His conviction stands. 

The only men who said they witnessed Aziz and Islam participate in the killing were FBI informants, Vance said. The bureau never revealed that information to the defense.  

A nearly two-year investigation by prosecutors and the Innocence Project found that FBI documents also showed that a description of the assassins did not match Aziz or Islam.

“In short, it is unknown whether the identification procedures used in this case were properly conducted,” the motion to vacate stated, ABC News reports.

In a letter to the bureau’s office in New York one year before the assassination, Hoover asked agents to “do something about Malcolm X,” according to previously disclosed documents. 

2 Men Found Guilty in Malcolm X Killing to Be Exonerated Because FBI, Police Withheld Evidence

Malcolm X. Photo: Wikipedia

By Steve Neavling

Two of three men convicted in the 1965 killing of civil rights leader Malcolm X are expected to be exonerated after authorities said the FBI and police had withheld evidence in the case, The New York Times first reported.

District Attorney Cyrus Vance Jr. said a 22-month investigation revealed that law enforcement withheld evidence in the trial of Muhammad A. Aziz, 83, and Khalil Islam, who died in 2009. Both men have maintained their innocence from the beginning. 

“This points to the truth that law enforcement over history has often failed to live up to its responsibilities,” Mr. Vance said. “These men did not get the justice that they deserved.”

Thomas Hagan, who also was convicted in the murder, confessed to the killing during his trial but was adamant that the two other men were not involved. His conviction stands. 

Malcolm X was delivering a speech when he was fatally shot at New York’s Audubon Ballroom on Feb. 21, 1965. 

FBI’s First Latina to Lead a Field Office Is Named Assistant Director of Insider Threat Office

Special FBI agent Rachel Rojas

By Steve Neavling

Rachel Rojas, who was serving as special agent in charge of the Jacksonville Field Office in Florida, has been named assistant director of the Insider Threat Office at FBI headquarters. 

Rojas’ career with the FBI began in 1996, when she served as an investigative specialist for the New York Field Office.

After completing her academy training in 2000, Rojas began investigating administrative and drug matters in New York. Following 9/11, she investigated financing data and communications linked to the attack. 

In 2005, Rojas was promoted to a supervisory special agent and transferred to the Terrorism Financing Operations Section of the Counterterrorism Division at FBI headquarters. In 2007, she returned to New York to oversee the applicant program before shifting her focus to mortgage and bank fraud. 

In 2012, Rojas became assistant special agent in charge of New York’s Criminal Division, where she was responsible for overseeing financial crime threats, public corruption, civil rights, health care fraud, and other issues. 

The following year, Rojas was named assistant special agent in charge of New York’s Violent Criminal Threat Branch, managing the Safe Streets gang and violent crime task forces, bank robberies, fugitives, human trafficking, and other programs. 

In 2015, Rojas returned to FBI Headquarters to serve as a section chief in the Security Division, where she was responsible for the physical and technical protection of bureau employees, facilities, information, and operations worldwide. 

In 2019, Rojas was appointed to lead the Jacksonville Field Office in Florida, becoming the first Latina special agent in charge. 

Rojas received a bachelor’s degree in communications/journalism from Boston University and a master’s degree in international management/leadership from Manhattanville College in Purchase, New York. 

FBI Arrests Suspected Serial Killer Accused of Fatally Shooting 6 People

Perez Reed, 25. Photo: St. Louis County Prosecutor’s Office

By Steve Neavling

The FBI on Monday arrested a suspected serial killer who may have killed six people and wounded two others in Missouri and Kansas. 

Agents arrested Perez Reed, 25, at a bus station on Friday, The Kansas City Star reports.

According to a special agent’s affidavit, Reed was wanted for shootings that began Sept. 12 in St. Louis County. A .40 caliber Smith & Wesson was used in each shooting, and shell casings matched the same gun. 

During his arrest, Reed was in possession of that handgun, according to the affidavit.  

On Monday, Reed was charged with the murders of two people, and additional charges are pending. 

U.S. Attorney Sayler Fleming said more than half a dozen of law enforcement agencies were involved in a “relentless investigation of these hideous and violent crimes.”

FBI Removes Arizona Fugitive from Ten Most Wanted Fugitives List

Photo: FBI

By Steve Neavling

The FBI removed from its Ten Most Wanted Fugitives List an Arizona fugitive accused of killing his wife and two children before setting their house on fire in April 2001. 

Although Robert Fisher remains at large, the FBI’s Phoenix Field Office said he no longer fits the criteria to be on the list. 

“Because the extensive publicity Fisher’s case received during its nearly 20 years on the list has not resulted in his successful location and/or capture, the case no longer fulfills that requirement,” the FBI said in a statement, Arizona Central reports.

Nevertheless, the FBI said it will continue to investigate his whereabouts. 

Fisher, who would be 60 years old if he’s still alive, is accused of slashing the throats of his 38-year-old wife and their two children, ages 10 and 12. His wife also was shot in the head. 

Authorities say Fisher, a former firefighter, then set his house on fire in hopes of covering up the crimes. 

According to a neighbor, Fisher and his wife were arguing the night before the murder. 

On Wednesday, the FBI announced that the alleged leader of the notorious M-13 gang in Honduras has been added to the Ten Most Wanted Fugitives List