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Tag: FBI

Raul Bujanda Named Special Agent in Charge of FBI’s Albuquerque Field Office in New Mexico

Special FBI Agent Raul Bujanda

By Steve Neavling

Raul Bujanda has been appointed special agent in charge of the FBI’s Albuquerque Field Office in New Mexico. 

Bujanda joined the FBI as a special agent in 2002, when he served in the Portland Field Office in Oregon and investigated violent crime, gang, and Mexican-based drug trafficking organizations.

Bujanda then joined the El Paso Field Office in Texas in 2008 to work on the Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Force strike force, which included members from the DEA, Homeland Security Investigations, and Border Patrol. He also continued to investigate Mexican-based drug trafficking organizations. In 2010, Bujanda was promoted to supervisory special agent of the El Paso strike force.

In 2013, Bujanda became unit chief in the Criminal Justice Information Services Division in West Virginia.

In 2015, Bujanda was tapped to serve as assistant inspector and team leader in the Inspection Division at FBI headquarters. He was promoted in 2016 to assistant special agent in charge of the National Security Branch in the Oklahoma City Field Office before serving as the assistant special agent in charge of Oklahoma City’s Criminal Branch, where he worked criminal violations and administrative matters.

Bujanda was named section chief of the Criminal Investigative Division’s National Covert Operations Section in 2019, managing and overseeing all criminal and national security undercover operations for the FBI.

Before joining the FBI, Bujanda was a special agent in the Immigration and Naturalization Service and a fifth-grade teacher.

Head of FBI’s El Paso Field Office to Leave Post for Promotion in Quantico

FBI Special Agent Luis M. Quesada

By Steve Neavling

Louis M. Quesada, special agent in charge of the El Paso Field Office, will leave his post on Friday to become deputy assistant director of the bureau’s Incident Response Group in Quantico. 

Quesada was promoted to head of the El Paso office in October 2019.

“Both professionally and personally, it has been a fantastic time, a time of growth,” Quesada told the El Paso Times. “I’m not from this area, but it’s been a wonderful experience. It’s a great community and I think that attributes to why El Paso is El Paso. For a major city to have the third least violent crimes and the fifth overall crime, I think speaks a lot to the people in the community and to the relationships that the law enforcement has with each other, which is something that I’ve never experienced in any other office in the last 25-plus years that I’ve been in the FBI.”

Quesada joined the FBI as a special agent in 1995 and began working in the Miami Field Office, where he investigated violent crimes with a focus on bank robberies, extortion, and kidnappings. In 1998, Quesada voluntarily transferred to the San Juan Field Office in Puerto Rico before returning to Miami in 2001 to investigates drugs. In both offices, Quesada served on the SWAT teams.

Quesada was promoted in 2003 to supervisory special agent and began working in the Counterterrorism Division of the Terrorist Screening Center, which manages and operates the nation’s terrorist watch list.

In 2005, he transferred to the FBI Academy in Quantico as a defensive tactics instructor. Quesada returned to Miami two years later as the supervisor of the violent gang and high-intensity drug trafficking area task force. He later became the acting assistant special agent in charge of Miami’s Criminal Branch.

In 2010, Quesada became the assistant legal attaché in Buenos Aires, Argentina, where he promoted FBI interests in Argentina, Paraguay, and Uruguay.

In 2012, Quesada was promoted to a unit chief position in the Criminal Investigative Division at FBI Headquarters in Washington, focusing on counter-narcotics efforts in Latin America and the U.S. Southwest border.

In 2014, Quesada became legal attaché of Sarajevo, Bosnia-Herzegovina, focusing on counterterrorism threats throughout the Balkans and the U.S.

A year later, Quesada became the assistant special agent in charge of the Criminal Branch in the Jackson Field Office in Mississippi. In 2017, he was appointed to assistant section chief in the Training Division, and a year later was promoted to section chief of the division’s Training Services Section.

Quesada earned a bachelor’s degree in liberal studies from Florida International University

FBI Remembers Fallen Agent Barry Lee Bush, Who Died on This Date in 2007

FBI Special Agent Barry Lee Bush

By Steve Neavling

On this date in 2007, an FBI agent was fatally shot while trying to arrest three heavily armed bank robbery suspects in central New Jersey. 

Barry Lee Bush, 52, of the FBI’s Newark Field Office, was killed when another agent’s gun accidentally discharged outside a PNC Bank branch in Readington.  

The agent who mistakenly shot Bush was absolved after an investigation by the FBI’s Office of Professional Responsibility determined the agent was within the bureau’s guidelines for firing his weapon. 

In honor of Bush in April 2008, the bureau’s Newark office was renamed after him.

Bush joined the FBI in 1987 and transferred from the Kansas City Field Office to Newark in 1991. 

At a memorial service on April 12, 2017, then-FBI Director Robert Mueller described Bush as a “dogged investigator” who “loved being part of the action.”

“Barry loved his job,” Mueller said at the time. “But he had two loves in his life. One was the Bureau. The other love—his first love— was his family. He talked about them constantly. They were his pride and joy. No matter how much he loved his work, he loved coming home at the end of the day even more.”

Read Mueller’s full remarks at the memorial service.

How the Disappearance of Ex-FBI Agent Robert Levinson Factors into Alleged Extortion Plot Involving Rep. Gaetz

Former FBI agent Robert Levinson disappeared while in Iran.

By Steve Neavling

The search for former FBI Agent Robert Levinson, who disappeared in Iran 14 years ago, appears to be at the center of an alleged extortion scheme involving a former federal prosecutor and U.S. Rep. Matt Gaetz, R-Fla.

The information came to light earlier this week when The New York Times reported that Gaetz is under investigation for a sexual relationship he allegedly had with a 17-year-old girl.

In an appearance on Fox News on Tuesday, Gaetz claimed former prosecutor David L. McGee, who has been searching for Levinson on behalf of his family, offered to make sex trafficking charges disappear in exchange for money to help in the search for the former FBI agent.

McGee denied wrongdoing, telling the Daily Beast that the extortion allegations are “completely, totally false,” adding, “This is a blatant attempt to distract from the fact that Matt Gaetz is apparently about to be indicted for sex trafficking underage girls.”

The whereabouts and fate of Levinson have been speculated about for years. On the 14th anniversary of his disappearance last month, the Biden administration called on Iran to return Levinson to his family and provide answers about what happened to him. 

Levinson, who would be 73, disappeared while on Kish Island, a tourist spot off the coast of Iran. He worked part-time for the CIA, and U.S. officials believed he died while in Iranian custody. 

He was last seen in a 2010 hostage video. 

Arkansas Man Sentenced to 40 Years in Prison for Death Threats to FBI Agents

FBI’s Little Rock Field Office. (FBI)

By Steve Neavling

An Arkansas man who sent death threats to FBI agents and a former U.S. attorney was sentenced to 40 years in federal prison on Wednesday. 

Clayton Jackson, 35, who was living in Dewitt, Arkansas, at the time, mailed two letters to the FBI office in Little Rock in February 2020 and March 2020, threatening to kill multiple bureau employees. Jackson signed the letters. 

In an interview with the FBI, Jackson admitted sending the letters and repeated his intention to kill the employees. 

After he was indicted, Jackson continued to send death threats to the employees and former U.S. Attorney Cody Hiland. In the letters, he said he planed to escape from prison to kill the employees and Hiland. 

Jackson pleaded guilty on Nov. 2 to three counts of threatening to assault and murder a federal official and two counts of mailing threatening communications. 

 “This defendant’s repeated threats against law enforcement were a failed attempt to intimidate those who have sworn to protect and serve,” Acting United States Attorney Jonathan D. Ross said in a statement. “This lengthy sentence should serve as a warning: threats like these will not be tolerated and will not prevent law enforcement from doing their important work of protecting our communities.”

Jason Van Goor, acting special agent in charge of the Little Rock office, added, “We take any threat against law enforcement seriously, and we believe Mr. Jackson’s 40-year sentence will serve as a warning to anyone thinking about threatening federal agents and officers. As always, we are grateful to our partners at the US Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of Arkansas for their tremendous work on this case.”

DOJ Investigating Rep. Gaetz for Alleged Sexual Relationship with Teenage Girl

U.S. Rep. Matt Gaetz, R-Florida.

By Steve Neavling

The Justice Department is investigating U.S. Rep. Matt Gaetz, R-Fla., for a sexual relationship he allegedly had with a 17-year-old girl, The New York Times reports

The investigation is trying to determine whether Gaetz, a 38-year-old conservative firebrand and close ally of former President Trump, violated federal sex trafficking laws. The probe began under then-Attorney General William Barr. 

Gaetz denied the allegations on Twitter and in media interviews, saying he and his family “have been victims of an organized and criminal extortion involving a former DOJ official seeking $25 million while threatening to smear my name.”

“We have been cooperating with federal authorities in this matter and my father has even been wearing a wire at the FBI’s direction to catch these criminals,” Gaetz tweeted. The planted leak to the FBI tonight was intended to thwart the investigation.”

Gaetz repeated his denials on Tucker Carlson’s Fox News program, which the host later called “one of the weirdest interviews I’ve ever conducted.”

The investigation is part of a broader probe of allegations against Joel Greenberg, a former county official in Florida who was arrested last year on charges of sex trafficking of a minor. 

https://twitter.com/ArtValley818_/status/1377073895421870082

Stanley M. Meador Named Special Agent in Charge of FBI’s Richmond Field Office

FBI Special Agent Stanley M. Meador

By Steve Neavling

Stanley M. Meador has been tapped to serve as special agent in charge of the FBI’s Richmond Field Office in Virginia. 

Meador, a native of Galax, Va., had been serving as chief of staff to the deputy director at FBI headquarters.

Meador’s career with the FBI began in 2002, when he was assigned to the Spokane Resident Agency in Washington, a satellite of the Seattle Field Office. He investigated violent crime, gangs, and Indian Country crimes, worked on intelligence matters, spearheaded the creation of the Safe Streets and Safe Trails task forces, and served as a firearms instructor and crisis negotiator.

In 2009, Meador joined the Las Vegas Field Office to investigate public corruption, violent gangs, and criminal enterprises.

In 2013, Meador was promoted to supervisory special agent and transferred to the International Operations Division (IOD) at headquarters. He was later promoted to chief of the IOD’s Asia Unit.

In 2015, Meador became supervisory senior resident agent of the Wilmington Resident Agency of the Charlotte Field Office, where he oversaw criminal and national security programs.

In 2019, Meador was named assistant special agent in charge in the Philadelphia Field Office, where he led administrative and special operation, overseeing 12 programs and all crisis management matters.

In 2020, he became chief of staff to the deputy director.

Before joining the FBI, Meador served as a special agent with the Virginia Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control. Meador received a bachelor’s degree from Roanoke College in Salem, Va., and a master’s degree from The American University in Washington. 

Meador also received a Declaration of Valor for his response to the Pentagon during 9/11.

FBI Releases Graphic Videos of Most Violent Assaults on Officers During Jan. 6 Riot

Screenshot of attack on officers at U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6.

By Steve Neavling

The FBI on Thursday released 10 videos showing the most egregious assaults on police officers during the Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol and is asking for the public’s help identifying the attackers. 

The FBI has arrested more than 300 people in connection with the riot, including 65 who assaulted law enforcement officers. But as the videos show, some of the most violent offenders have not yet been identified. 

“The FBI is asking for the public’s help in identifying 10 individuals suspected of being involved in some of the most violent attacks on officers who were protecting the U.S. Capitol and our democratic process on January 6,” Steven M. D’Antuono, assistant director in charge of the FBI’s Washington Field Office, said in a statement. “These individuals are seen on video committing egregious crimes against those who have devoted their lives to protecting the American people.”

Anyone with information about the suspects in the videos is asked to call (800) CALL-FBI or submit a tip online at tips.fbi.gov.