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Tag: FBI

K-9 Named in Honor of Fallen FBI Special Agent Charles W. Elmore

The 1-year-old German shorthaired pointed is named after FBI Special Agent Charles W. Elmore. Photo: Leesburg Police Department

By Steve Neavling

A police department in Virginia named their new K-9 in honor of FBI Special Agent Charles W. Elmore, who was killed in the line of duty on Aug. 9, 1979.

The 1-year-old German shorthaired pointer, Elmore, recently graduated from training in patrol duties and drug detection for the Leesburg Police Department. 

The police department received an anonymous $15,000 donation to cover the costs of purchasing and training the dog. The donor requested that the dog be named in honor of Elmore.

Elmore and Special Agent J. Robert Porter were fatally shot by an assailant while in the FBI office in El Centro, Calif.

Elmore, who became a special agent with the FBI in 1972, was 33 years old. 

“It’s been more than 42 years since the tragic killings of Special Agents Charles Elmore and Robert Porter at our El Centro Resident Agency,” FBI Special Agent in Charge Suzanne Turner said in a statement. “There have been many tributes and memorials throughout the years honoring both men, to include streets in El Centro being named after each of them. We honor them every year on August 9 here in our field office. They are on the FBI Wall of Honor in every FBI field office and at FBI Headquarters and Quantico. This gesture is a very thoughtful and unique tribute to Special Agent Elmore—a tribute which will carry his name and legacy while continuing the fight against crime.”

FBI Special Agent Charles W. Elmore

Leesburg Police Chief Gregory Brown said the K-9 will he helpful. 

“I am excited to welcome Elmore to the LPD family. Working together, K9 Elmore and Officer (Lelia) Brickley will assist in serving and protecting our community through such tasks as locating missing juveniles, as well as locating those experiencing cognitive impairments who become lost,” Leesburg Police Chief Gregory Brown said in a statement.  “I also want the community to know that true heroes are never forgotten.  We honor the memory of FBI Special Agent Charles Elmore through our newest K-9 team member.”

El Chapo’s Wife Sentenced to 3 Years in Prison for Helping Drug Kingpin Run Cartel

‘El Chapo’ Guzman

By Steve Neavling

The wife of convicted drug lord Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman was sentenced to three years in prison Tuesday for helping her husband run his cartel and aiding his 2015 escape from a Mexican prison.

Emma Coronel Aispuro, a 31-year-old former beauty queen, pleaded guilty on June 10 to three criminal counts, including conspiracy to traffic cocaine and money laundering.

Prosecutors said Coronel Aispuro was a co-conspirator in the activities of the Sinaloa Cartel.  

Guzman, the longtime head of the Sinaloa, was convicted in 2019 on drug conspiracy charges and sentenced to life in prison. 

Coronel helped Guzman ship drugs and evade capture and later was the main conspirator in the successful plot to break him out of the Altiplano prison in Mexico.  

The FBI’s Washington Field  Office led the investigation, with assistance from FBI Field Offices, the Drug Enforcement Administration and Homeland Security Investigations. 

FBI: Dayton Mass Shooter Motivated by ‘Enduring Fascination with Mass Violence’

Mass shooter Connor Betts. Photo: Facebook

By Steve Neavling

A gunman who opened fire in downtown Dayton, Ohio and killed nine people and wounded 27 others in August 2019 had an “enduring fascination with mass violence,” according to the FBI’s Behavioral Analysis Unit. 

Connor Betts also likely had mental health issues, the report, which was released Monday, concludes, ABC News reports.  

The FBI found that Betts acted alone and was not acting on behalf of an idealogical group. 

“The FBI’s BAU assessed the attacker’s enduring fascination with mass violence and his inability to cope with a convergence of personal factors, to include a decade-long struggle with multiple mental health stressors and the successive loss of significant stabilizing anchors experienced prior to August 4, 2019, likely were the primary contributors to the timing and finality of his decision to commit a mass shooting in Dayton, Ohio,” the report states.

The shooting came one day after another gunman killed 23 people at a Walmart in El Paso, Texas. 

Although Betts had “suicidal and violent fantasies,” there were no specific signs that he was dangerous to others, the report states that 

“This underscores the importance of bystanders’ attentiveness to more subtle changes an individual may exhibit that could be indicative of their decision to commit violence, such as a change in personal circumstances, an increase in perceived stressors, or language indicating they may be contemplating suicide,” the FBI said.

FBI Offices in Northwestern Pennsylvania Have a New Leader

Photo via FBI.

By Steve Neavling

Jason T. Crouse has been named senior supervisory senior resident agent of the FBI offices in Erie and New Castle, Pa. 

The offices cover seven counties in northwestern Pennsylvania. 

Crouse, a Pennsylvania native and 19-year veteran of the bureau, replaced Supervisory Special Agent Mark Beneski. 

Beneski told the Erie Times-News that Crouse is a good fit for the position.

“He’s definitely a hard-working guy, definitely dedicated to the Erie area,” Beneski said. “He’s been here a long time, and in that time he’s made a lot of great relationships throughout the whole area.”

Crouse received an undergraduate degree in criminal justice from the University of Maryland and a law degree from the School of Law at Wake Forest University. 

Before joining the bureau, he worked as a public defender in Maryland. 

“Law enforcement was always in the back of my mind, something I always wanted to do,” he said. “As I progressed through college and law school, I always viewed the FBI as the pinnacle of law enforcement, so that’s what I set my sights on.”

Crouse’s career with the FBI began in Erie, where he served for seven years as a coordinator for the Erie Area Gang Law Enforcement task force (EGLE) 

For roughly the next decade, Crouse investigated violent crimes against children. 

“While that was my primary focus, based on small number agents we have here and the broad spectrum of investigations we have to undertake, I’ve had experience in all those violations. So I’ve worked counterterrorism investigations, bank robbery, white collar fraud, health care fraud. And not always as a case agent in charge of an investigation but certainly in a supporting role here,” he said.

Crouse said the top priorities at the Erie office are counterterrorism and national security, as well as violent crimes and fentanyl.  

FBI Agent Who Worked Near Russia Has Symptoms Consistent with Havana Syndrome

By Steve Neavling

A former FBI agent said he’s suffering from a mysterious and often debilitating affliction known as Havana Syndrome. 

Now the bureau, which had not previously acknowledged that some of its current or former employees could have the syndrome, is offering access to medical care for agents who have symptoms, NBC News reports.

The former agent was originally denied medical treatment for the syndrome, according to an email from an FBI official that said the bureau “is not authorized to give any medical advice and there are not any medical programs in place for current and/or retired employees” for potential brain injury symptoms. 

The agent said he had suffered from migraines and dizziness about a decade after he served overseas in a country near Russia. 

When NBC News asked the bureau about the email, the FBI said it was “one part of a larger exchange taken out of context and does no reflect the FBI’s commitment to supporting its personnel, both current and former.”

The Havana Syndrome dates back to late 2016, when dozens of American officials and family members who were in Cuba or China reported symptoms consistent with the Havana Syndrome. They include headaches, nausea, vertigo, memory loss, bloody noses, and hearing bizarre sounds. 

Some authorities believe the syndrome is the result of weaponized microwave radiation, while others say it may be from pesticides or a psychological illness. 

The FBI’s statements added that the bureau “does not have the authority to provide direct medical treatment, we now have a process to guide current and former employees to the interagency medical treatment and evaluation options that are available to them.”

“Anomalous Health Incidents is a top priority for the FBI, as the protection, health and well-being of our employees and colleagues across the federal government is paramount.”

Retired FBI Agent Vies for State Senate Seat in Texas

Retired FBI Agent Tim Reid. Photo: Campaign

By Steve Neavling

A retired FBI agent is running for a seat on the state Senate in Texas. 

Tim Reid, a Republican, is vying to replace retiring Sen. Kel Seliger, R-Amarillo, The Amarillo Pioneer reports.

Reid worked as an FBI agent in Amarillo from 1986 to 2005, according to his press release. He now serves as director of athletics and campus safety at Ascension Academy in Amarillo, where he also teaches geopolitics, geography, and crime scene forensics. 

Reid previously served as a member of the Canyon ISD Board of Trustees. 

The primary election is scheduled for March 1, 2022. 

Paul Keenan, Special Agent in Charge of FBI’s Indianapolis Field Office, Set to Retire

Paul Keenan, special agent in charge of the Indianapolis Field Office.

By Steve Neavling

Paul Keenan, special agent in charge of the FBI’s Indianapolis Field Office, will retire on Nov. 30 after 24 years of service with the bureau. 

Keenan has led the Indianapolis Field Office since June 2020. 

Keenan’s career with the FBI began in 2003, when he investigated violent gangs out of the Los Angeles Field Office. In 2009, Keenan took charge of the Violent Gang Squad and later the High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area Squad, investigating Mexican drug cartels.

In 2012, Keenan became the assistant legal attaché in Panama City, representing the bureau in Panama, Costa Rica, and Nicaragua. While there, he helped capture two of the FBI’s Ten Most Wanted fugitives.

In 2014, Keenan began serving in the Knoxville Field Office in Tennessee as the supervisory senior special agent of the Chattanooga Resident Agency. He led the investigation into a homegrown violent extremist attack on two military installations.

In 2016, Keenan became the assistant special agent in charge of the Operational Support Branch of the Miami Field Office, which included all specialty teams, the Computer Analysis Response Team, media operations, and several other programs.

In 2017, Keenan became ASAC of one of Miami’s criminal branches, where he led investigations of the mass shootings at the Fort Lauderdale airport and at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School.

In 2018, Keenan was named chief of the Investigative and Operations Support Section in CIRG, where he led the National Center for the Analysis of Violent Crime. In addition, he served as an acting deputy assistant director at CIRG.

Before coming to the FBI, Mr. Keenan was a special agent with the DEA. He holds a B.A. in political science from Indiana University.

FBI Special Agent Kerry Inglis Receives Director’s Award for Excellence in Investigation

By Steve Neavling

FBI Special Agent Kerry Inglis of the Indianapolis Field Office received the Director’s Award for Excellence in Investigation for helping take down a drug-trafficking organization. 

Inglis was the case agent on Operation Electric Avenue, which led to a series of raids at two dozen locations in Indianapolis and Phoenix and resulted in the arrests of 25 people, including drug kingpin Richard Grundy III and his organization, the Grundy Crew. 

Grundy, whose drug organization was called the Grundy Crew, was convicted in August 2019 of conspiracy to distribute drugs worth $3.5 million in 2016 and 2017. 

The Grundy Crew distributed more than 400 pounds of methamphetamine and large amount of cocaine, heroin and marijuana.