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Tag: fake pot

DEA Extends Ban on “Fake Pot” Products

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

The DEA is continuing to go after “fake pot.”

The agency announced earlier this week on its website that it was extending by six months a ban on five chemicals used to make fake pot, which have been sold at retail outlets and head shops.

The ban, under the DEA’s emergency scheduling authority, makes it illegal to possess or or sell the products.

The initial temporary ban began a year ago. The DEA is moving toward making the ban permanent.

“We continue to address the problems of synthetic drug manufacturing, trafficking, and abuse. Our efforts have clearly shown that these chemicals present an imminent threat to public safety,” said DEA Administrator Michele M. Leonhart in a statement. “This six month extension is critical and gives us the time necessary to conduct the administrative scheduling process for permanent control.”

The DEA said the smokeable herbal products marketed as being “legal” have become increasingly popular, particularly among teens and young adults. The DEA said the products consist of plant material that has been coated with research chemicals that claim to mimic THC, the active ingredient in marijuana.

The DEA said it has received an increased number of reports from poison control centers, hospitals and law enforcement regarding these products since 2009.

Ex-Trashman Makes Killing on Pot-Like High Product

Derek Williams/facebook

By Justin Blum
Bloomberg

Derek Williams was working as a trash-truck driver when his cousin told him about K2, a product made from plant materials and chemicals that provided a legal, marijuana-like high. Williams saw his ticket out of the residential rubbish business: Make a better blend.

He studied compounds that mimic the effects of pot, and almost a year after creating his own brand, Syn Incense, in his home in Kansas City, Missouri, Williams, 29, said he has sold more than $1.5 million worth in at least 10 states. Marketing the product as incense helps him avoid federal regulations, even though he said he knows most customers smoke it.

His ability to stay a step ahead of federal and state authorities underscores the hurdles regulators face as they move to ban chemicals used in such products, which they say may pose serious and unknown dangers. Williams said when his ingredients are restricted, he switches to similar ones.

“It became a money-making machine,” said Williams, adding that he hopes the business will lead to early retirement.

To read more click here.

DEA Cracking Down on “Fake Pot”

Michele Leonhart/dea photo

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

WASHINGTON — The DEA on Wednesday announced it was using its “emergency scheduling authority” to temporarily outlaw  five chemicals used to make “fake pot” products.

The DEA said the move was in response to the increasingly popularity of the products that were harming people.

The DEA said plans to oulaw the products for at least 12 months with the possibility of a six-month extension. They will be designated as Schedule I substances, the most restrictive category.

In a press release the DEA stated: “Over the past year, smokable herbal blends marketed as being ‘legal’ and providing a marijuana-like high, have become increasingly popular, particularly among teens and young adults.

“These products consist of plant material that has been coated with research chemicals that mimic THC, the active ingredient in marijuana, and are sold at a variety of retail outlets, in head shops and over the Internet.”

The DEA said since 2009 it has received an increasing number of reports from poison centers, hospitals and law enforcement about the fake pot products.

“The American public looks to the DEA to protect its children and communities from those who would exploit them for their own gain,” said DEA Acting Administrator Michele M. Leonhart. “Makers of these harmful products mislead their customers into thinking that ‘fake pot’ is a harmless alternative to illegal drugs, but that is not the case.”