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Tag: facial recognition

FBI Plans to Have 52 Million Photos in Its Facial Recognition Database by 2015

RecognitionSource.net

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

If all goes as planned, the FBI’s facial recognition database will include 52 million photos by 2015, the Verge reports.

That’s an increase of more than three-fold from the 16 million that were in the database in the middle of 2013.

Of those, 4.3 million images were for “non-criminal purposes,” according to documents obtained by the Electronic Frontier Foundation.

What remains unclear is where the non-criminal photos derived and why the FBI is using them.

“Facial recognition technology has the potential to improve services for consumers, support innovation by businesses, and affect identification and authentication online and offline,” the National Telecommunications and Information Administration said in a statement this past February. “However, the technology poses distinct consumer privacy challenges.”

FBI’s Facial-Recognition Technology Could Fail Up to 20% of the Time

Courtesy of RecognitionSource.net

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

The FBI has said its facial-recognition technology is a critical component of fighting the war on terror and other serious threats.

But new records indicate the technology could fail 20% of the time, the National Journal reports.

“An innocent person may become part of an investigation because the technology isn’t completely accurate,” said Jeramie Scott, an attorney with EPIC who reviewed the documents, citing the Boston Marathon bombings as an example. “They’re pushing it forward even though the technology isn’t ready for prime time.”

The FBI could’t be reached for comment.

The technology is part of the FBI’s Next Generation Identification program, which includes iris and fingerprint scans.

 

FBI Begins to Install $1 Billion Face Recognition System

Courtesy of RecognitionSource.net

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

The FBI is preparing its newest weapon against crime – a $1 billion national facial recognition system.

The Next Generation Identification program, which is expected to be rolled out nationwide by 2014, matches surveillance images of known criminals, reports CNET.

The system is designed to compare a photo to the FBI’s database of mugshots to identify suspects.

It’s unclear how accurate the program is, but some civil liberties groups worry the program could add innocent people to the database of mugshots, according to CNET.

FBI: More Local Police to Use Facial Recognition Program

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Local police across the country soon will be using the FBI’s facial recognition software to help identify suspects, reports Government Computer News.

The FBI is extending its facial recognition pilot to other states after Michigan began testing the program in February.

Hawaii and Maryland are planning to sign on to the program. Others expected to include  South Carolina, Ohio, New Mexico, Kansas, Arizona, Tennessee, Nebraska and Missouri, according to GCN.

The software would enable local police to search a repository of about 13 million criminal mug shots.

FBI Unveils New Facial Recognition System

By Danny Fenster
ticklethewire.com

Prepare yourselves for a protracted battle between privacy rights advocates and the FBI this winter. FBI officials told the website NextGov by January they will activate a nationwide facial recognition service, allowing local police in select states to identify unknown subjects in photos.

The Feds are embarking on “a multiyear, $1 billion dollar overhaul of the FBI’s existing fingerprint database to more quickly and accurately identify suspects,” reports NextGov. The upgrade will include the use of  other biometric markers like iris scans and voice recordings.

Often law enforcement authorities will “have a photo of a person and for whatever reason they just don’t know who it is [but they know] this is clearly the missing link to our case,” Nick Megna, a unit chief at the FBI’s criminal justice information services division, told NextGov.

Currently, officers would need the name of an individual to search for mugshots in their database. But, according to NextGov,

“Using the new Next-Generation Identification system that is under development, law enforcement analysts will be able to upload a photo of an unknown person; choose a desired number of results from two to 50 mug shots; and, within 15 minutes, receive identified mugs to inspect for potential matches.”

Sunita Patel, a staff attorney with the Center for Constitutional Rights, has voiced concerns about the new technology.

“Any database of personal identity information is bound to have mistakes. And with the most personal immutable traits like our facial features and fingerprints, the public can’t afford a mistake,” she said, according to NextGov. “The federal government is using local cops to create a massive surveillance system.”

Michigan, Washington, Florida and North Carolina will test out the new systems this winter, before it is unrolled nationwide in 2014, the website reported.

To read more click here.