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Tag: facebook

Senators Want Justice Dept. to Probe Employers Asking for Facebook Passwords

By Leslie Horn
PC Magazine

Two U.S. senators are asking the Justice Department and Equal Employment Opportunity Commission to investigate whether employers asking for the Facebook passwords of job applicants is against the law.

The Associated Press is reporting that the offices of Democratic Sens. Chuck Schumer of New York and Richard Blumenthal of Connecticut announced that they have called for an official probe.

The news follows several reports of companies either asking for job candidates’ Facebook passwords or watching as candidates login to their accounts and click through photos, wall posts, comments, and other items that might otherwise be protected by privacy controls, a practice known as “shoulder surfing.”

To read the full story click here.

FBI Looking for Ways to Better Monitor Social Media

By Danny Fenster
ticklethewire.com

It is no secret that social networks provide riches of info available to the public.

And the FBI is looking for ways to cash in on that and  better monitor info on social networks like Facebook and Twitter,  reports the New Scientist.

A document released on January 19  shows the bureau was looking for companies that might want to build a social network monitoring system for the FBI,  according to the New Scientist.

“The bureau’s wish list calls for the system to be able to automatically search ‘publicly available’ material from Facebook, Twitter and other social media sites for keywords relating to terrorism, surveillance operations, online crime and other FBI missions,” the publication reported. “Agents would be alerted if the searches produce evidence of “breaking events, incidents, and emerging threats”.

That document suggests the FBI wishes to use social media sites to look into specific groups of individuals, allowing agents to “locate bad actors…and analyze their movements, vulnerabilities, limitations, and possible adverse actions,” allowing the FBI to create “pattern-of-life matrices,” or logs of suspects’  daily routines, says the New Scientist.

To read more click here.

Secret Service Investigate Angry Facebook Poster

By Danny Fenster
ticklethewire.com

A failed city council candidate from Carson, Calif. has caught the attention of the Secret Service after posting racist commentary about the president on Facebook, reports the Los Angeles Times.

Jules Manson, who ran in March for city council on the Libertarian platform, called Barack Obama a “monkey,” then called for the assassination of the president and his “monkey children.”

“We are aware of the incident and are going to conduct appropriate followup,” said Secret Service spokesman George Ogilvie, according to the LA Times.

Manson’s post was made in reaction to the controversial National Defense Authorization Act, which permits indefinite detention without trial for some terrorism suspects.

Manson later erased the comment and apologized, saying it was “careless, emotionally driven remarks that had no real substance.” He was, perhaps, not entirely sorry. He went on to write that “Not including my regular friends whom I converse with often or have in the past and always welcome their comments and posts, I do not believe many of you are concerned citizens. Most of you were simply looking for drama to demonstrate your politically correct righteousness.”

To read more click here.

 

Secret Service Investigates Threatening Messages on White House Facebook Page

 By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

There’s a downside to the White House being hip to social media.

The Associated Press reports that the Secret Service is investigating three threatening messages that were posted on the White House’s Facebook page.

The messages, first reported by WNBC in New York, included a photo of Osama bin Laden and said, according to the AP:

The messages included a picture of Osama bin Laden and said, “We’ll come back 11/9/2011 to kill u all.”

AP reported that Secret Service spokesman Ed Donovan said the matter has has been referred to the agency’s Internet threat desk.

 

FBI Helps Hunt Ex-NBA Player Wanted for Murder

Javaris Crittenton/facebook photo

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Javaris Crittenton, who was suspended by the NBA in a gun incident in Washington in 2009, was not the most sought after player in the league.

But now he feels more wanted — by the FBI that is.

The Associated Press reports that the FBI is helping Atlanta and Los Angeles police search for the former NBA player on charges of murder.

AP reports that Crittenton is wanted in the fatal shooting of Jullian Jones, 22, a mother of four who was murdered on Aug. 19 in Atlanta. AP reported that she was not the intended target when Crittention opened fire from an SUV.

Authorities say Jones likely was not the intended target when Crittenton fired shots from an SUV. Authorities say Crittenton was retaliating for an April robbery in which he was a victim.

Crittenton had a limited career, having played a total of 113 games for teams like the Washington Wizards and the Memphis Grizzlies.

In 2010, he pleaded guilty and got probation for a gun possession charge after he and then-Washington Wizards star Gilbert Arenas pulled guns on each other in the locker room over a gambling debts.  Both were suspended, but he never returned to the Wizards.

He eventually ended up playing for the Dakota Wizards, a minor league basketball team.

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST

California “Geezer Bandit” Strikes Again; Has Thousands of Fans Cheering Him On

"Geezer Bandit"/fbi photo

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

On one Facebook fan page, where the California “Geezer Bandit” has 6,798 people who “like this”, fan Carl Randall wrote on Saturday: “So THIS is what happens when the government freezes Social Security COLA raises!! LOL! YOU GO GEEZER BANDIT!!”

Fan Ronnie Israel wrote: “Geezer has the FBI going around in circles, Geezers a pimp!”

The comments came after the elder looking bandit, who appears to be around 70,  hit his 14th bank in the San Diego area on Friday in San Luis Obispo County. The bandit has continued to  dumbfound agents who have been on the hunt since August of 2009.

The bandit, with revolver in tow,  stuck up  the 14th bank — the Heritage Oaks Bank branch in Morro Bay, the FBI said, according to the Los Angeles Times. The Times reported he may have fled in a light-colored, two-door car.

The Geezer Bandit is suspected of robbing 10 banks in San Diego County and one each in Temecula, Bakersfield, Goleta and Morro Bay, the Times reported.

Previously, authorities had said they had not ruled out the possibility that the Geezer Bandit might be a young person wearing a mask to look like a senior citizen.

This would be his 14th robbery since August 2009.

“The agents and detectives who have been working this case since the beginning, strongly believe that this was the work of the Geezer Bandit,” Special Agent Darrell Foxworth of the San Diego FBI office told Fox 5 San Diego.

Six Decades Later, FBI’s Top 10 Most Wanted List Still Hard to Crack

Osama bin Laden

By Allan Lengel
For AOL News

WASHINGTON — In the film “Take the Money and Run,” Woody Allen played a bumbling, publicity-starved petty criminal named Virgil Starkwell. “You know he never made the Ten Most Wanted list,” Starkwell’s wife, Louise, lamented in the 1969 comedy. “It’s very unfair voting. It’s who you know.”

As Allen’s fictitious character learned, getting on the FBI’s Ten Most Wanted Fugitives list is no easy feat. Just being a vicious criminal or a menace to society isn’t always enough.

For one, there has to be an opening. And then there’s the selection process: A committee at FBI headquarters reviews dozens of candidates from FBI field offices — there are 56 in all — before the top brass weighs in with a final decision.

“I’d be lying to say there’s no politics involved” in getting someone on the list, Tony Riggio, a former FBI agent and official, told AOL News.

In 1978, Riggio had the first organized crime figure — Cleveland mobster Anthony “Tony Lib” Liberatore — placed on the Most Wanted list. Riggio said sometimes an extra call to headquarters from a top official in the field helped get someone on the list, adding, “Being a top 10 case agent is really a feather in your cap. I got a lot of respect.”

James Earl Ray/fbi photo

Over the years, the Ten Most Wanted alum have included some of the nation’s most notorious criminals, including escaped Martin Luther King Jr. assassin James Earl Ray, serial killer Ted Bundy and current member, Boston mobster James “Whitey” Bulger, who is wanted in connection with 19 murders. Most stay on until they are captured, a case no longer seems solid or authorities figure the person has died. Osama bin Laden was on the list up until his execution on May 1.

According to the FBI website, the list came about after a reporter for the International News in 1949 told the FBI he was interested in writing a story about the “toughest guys” the FBI was after. The FBI provided the names and descriptions of 10 fugitives — four escaped prisoners, three con men, two murder suspects and a bank robber — and the reporter wrote a story that captured national attention and triggered hundreds of tips.

Earlier this month, the bigger-than-life list, which had long become part of the American vernacular, turned 61. For decades a fixture in post offices and banks, the Ten Most Wanted photos are now more likely to pop up on TV shows, billboards and the Internet through websites and trendy social networks like Facebook and Twitter.

“We recognize the unique ability of the media to cast a wider net within communities here and abroad,” FBI Director Robert Mueller said in a statement marking the 60th anniversary. “The FBI can send agents to visit a thousand homes to find a witness, but the media can visit a million homes in an instant.”

Brad Bryant, chief of the Violent Crimes/Major Offenders Unit at FBI headquarters, says getting on the list is “very competitive.” Field offices are notified at once when an opening occurs.

“The criteria we’re looking for are, first of all, they must be particularly dangerous or be a menace to society or have a lengthy criminal history,” Bryant said.

Often, dozens of recommendations come in to headquarters, Bryant said. Field offices submit packets with information about the case, including a case file, photos and reasons why the person is worthy of joining the list. Some submissions include endorsements from local police chiefs.

The Violent Crimes/Major Offenders Unit also solicits input from the media representatives at headquarters, said Rex Tomb, who was chief of the FBI’s fugitive publicity unit in Washington until he retired from the bureau in 2006.

Boston Mobster Whitey Bulger

“Public affairs personnel like myself were generally asked by the Criminal Division to comment only on whether or not we believed there would be media interest in a fugitive,” Tomb said. “If for some reason there is little or no public interest in a particular case, reporters would generally pass on writing about it. … If there would be little print given to a Top Ten fugitive then there is really little or no reason to put him or her on the list.”

The candidates for the list are reviewed by a committee of agents from the Violent Crimes/Major Offenders unit, who carefully look over the submissions and case files.

“We rank the top four or five in the packet, and we prepare a briefing packet for the assistant director of the criminal division and his boss and the deputy director and the director,” Bryant said. Mueller must then sign off on it.

The tenor of the times has been reflected in the list over the years. In the 1950s, it hosted bank robbers. In the 1960s, some radicals made the cut, and later, organized crime figures and drug traffickers and eventually terrorists, violent gang members and sexual predators were added.

The shortest time anyone spent on the list was two hours. The longest-tenured was Donald Eugene Webb, wanted in the slaying of a police chief in Saxonburg, Pa., in 1980. He stayed on for 25 years, 10 months and 27 days before being removed in 2007. The FBI provided little reason why, only to say he no longer fit the criteria.

The oldest person ever to make the list is mobster Bulger, who got on in 1999 at age 69 and has stayed there ever since.

The list is regarded as a highly successful tool for the FBI. Of the 494 who have appeared on the list, 463 have been captured or located, with 152 of those from a direct result of citizen cooperation, the FBI said.

There are countless stories of citizens’ tips from the Ten Most Wanted Fugitives list resulting in arrests. Two fugitives were even apprehended as a result of visitors on an FBI tour who saw the photos.

Ted Bundy

Retired FBI agent Brad Garrett said that in the end, a $2 million-plus cash award — not the Ten Most Wanted listing — helped bring in information that led to the capture of fugitive Mir Aimal Kasi at a seedy hotel in Pakistan. Kasi opened fire outside CIA headquarters in Langley, Va., in 1993, killing two CIA employees and wounding three others. A few months after the shooting, he landed on the list.

“It’s an incredibly successful and novel idea, and it has captured hundreds of fugitives,” Garrett said of the famous list. “But I think it’s a lot more effective in the U.S. than outside” in places like Pakistan.

“I think the idea of a top 10 didn’t carry a lot of weight” in this case, Garrett said. “The dollar signs after his name carried a lot of weight.”

ATF Investigating Whether VA. Inmate Used Facebook to Threaten Witnesses

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Apparently Facebook isn’t just for chatting it up with old pals or initiating a discussion about the latest Monet art exhibit.

ATF is investigating allegations that a Virginia inmate used Facebook to threaten government witnesses in his upcoming arson case, station WSLS reported.

The station, citing a federal search warrant for his cell, said investigators were trying to determine if inmate John Conner Jr. contacted his girlfriend via phone and mail and had her contact witnesses in his upcoming trial through his Facebook account.

Conner, an inmate serving a six year sentence at the Western Virginia Regional Jail in Salem, Va., is awaiting trial in April on federal charges that he set his ex-girlfriend’s duplex on fire on Nov. 15, 2008 when they were still together, WSLS reported.

The station reported that he set the fire after his girlfriend spit in his face during a spat.