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Tag: facebook

DEA Uses Woman’s Photos, Info to Create Fake Facebook Account in Drug Probe

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Should law enforcement have the right to conduct an investigation by using photos and other personal information to create a fake Facebook page in a real person’s name?

The Justice Department said Tuesday it will examine the after Sondra Arquiett in Watertown, N.Y., filed a lawsuit that claims the DEA used photos, including one of her in a bra and underwear, and other information from her cellphone to create the fake account, the Washington Post reports. The information was gathered during a 2010 arrest for possession with intent to distribute cocaine.

In hopes of finding others involved in the alleged drug ring, police set up the fake account.

The DEA also posted photos of her children.

“The allegations in this case are shocking,” said Mariko Hirose, staff attorney for the New York Civil Liberties Union. “This case illustrates the importance of digital privacy and identity, and the possibility of abuse when law enforcement is able to access the trove of personal information that we store in our devices.”

Facebook’s Facial Recognition System Is Superior to FBI’s Next Generation Identification

RecognitionSource.net

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

When the FBI’s facial recognition system becomes operational this summer, it won’t be as accurate as Facebook’s system, the Verge reports.

The Next Generation Identification, which will store millions of photos, lists a ranking of 50 possible faces with an 85% chance of being correct, according to Verge.

Facebook’s new DeepFace system, by comparison, is more accurate. Give it two photos and it will identify the person with 97% accuracy.

“What will kill these systems is the false-accept rate,” said Shahar Belkin, CTO of FST Biometrics. “I don’t believe we’ll see a solution for that in the next five to ten years.”

Part of the problem is that the FBI is using poor quality photos that don’t show the face straight-on.

Public Face of Anonymous Pleads Guilty in Case That Could Land Him in Prison for 8.5 Years

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Barrett Lancaster Brown became the public face for Anonymous, a hacking collective that has wrecked havoc on computers nationwide.

Now the spokesman-like figure faces up to eight-and-half years in prison for public posts he made on YouTube and Twitter targeting FBI Agent Robert Smith because authorities were threatening to go after his mom for obstruction of justice charges on accusations that she tried to hide one of Brown’s computer’s, CNET reports.

“Robert Smith’s life is over,” Brown said in a YouTube video. “When I say his life is over, I’m not saying I’m going to kill him, but I am going to ruin his life…”

On Tuesday, Brown, 32, pleaded guilty to federal charges of making Internet threats, obstructing a search warrant and being an accessory to unauthorized access of a protected computer.

Brown’s attorneys Jay Leiderman told CNET Brown was protected by his first-amendment rights.

“It looks like he may have a very strong First Amendment defense to this,” Leiderman said. “Barrett engages in a lot of hyperbole, a lot of saber rattling, and he often speaks off the cuff and says sometimes things I don’t really think he means. Without having talked to him it’s hard for me to conceive of this as really a threat, as opposed to posturing, puffery.”

Man Who Impersonated DEA Agent to Impress at Nightclubs Sentenced to 18 Months in Prison

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Benjamin William Mejias seemed to tell anyone who would listen that he was a DEA agent.

He even posted photos of himself on Facebook wearing a DEA insignia and carrying guns and was so brazen that he repeated his story to an Orlando cop while wearing a DEA uniform, a badge and pistol.

On Monday, he was sentenced to 18 months in federal prison for what a judge called “stupid” behavior, the Orlando Sentinel reports.

His defense attorney, Mike LaFay, said Mejias did it to impress his wife and others at Orlando nightclubs.
Meijas apologized Monday: “I’m very shameful.”

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST

 

Judge: FBI Has Right to Access Woman’s Facebook Posts in Lawsuit

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Be careful what you write on Facebook.

In one case, the FBI has the right to access the Facebook posts of a woman who is suing the bureau over what she claims was a misguided 2011 raid, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reports.

Shaquel Adams must turn over pages from her Facebook account, particularly to demonstrate claims that she suffered from severe emotional distress.

“While the Court acknowledges that discovery of such matters is intrusive and regards personal matters which are typically not shared publicly, by asserting claims seeking damages for their emotional distress allegedly sustained during the events of March 3, 2011, Plaintiffs have put their own mental health, therapy and school records at issue in this case,” U.S. District Judge Nora Barry Fischer wrote.

Convicted Felon Shows Off on Facebook with Guns, Leading to Arrests

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Hollis Nunnery didn’t let the fact that he was a convicted felon get in the way of posting pictures of himself holding guns on Facebook, WoodTV.com reports.

Nunnery also happened to be the focus of an FBI investigation into bank robberies.

After spotting Nunnery holding a large handgun with a laster site, another handgun and a pistol-gripped shotgun on Facebook, an FBI task force took action.

Nunnery was charged in federal court with being a felon in possession of a firearm.

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST


Tech Companies Urge Congress to Shed More Light on Secret Information Requests

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

More than two dozen companies and numerous trade groups are endorsing bills that would open more light on the government’s secret information requests, the Verge.com reports.

The businesses and trade groups are showing their support for bills that would allow them to reveal when they receive requests for national security-related data.

Among those who signed the letter to Congressional members are Apple, Facebook, Google, Microsoft and Yahoo.

Those same companies have been forced to turn over information without the ability to disclose it.

The argument is that barring the disclosure of information to users violates free speech rights.

Internet Companies Call For More Disclosure of Surveillance

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Microsoft, Twitter, Google and Facebook are calling for more disclosure of secret requests to hand over date of users, The Guardian reports.

“Permitting greater transparency on the aggregate volume and scope of national security requests, including Fisa orders, would help the community understand and debate these important issues,” Microsoft said in an emailed statement.

The federal government issues national security letters to demand access to computer data.

It’s currently against the law to disclose how many secret requests were turned over under the controversial Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act.