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Tag: emails

Brazilian Official Seeks Protection from U.S. Secret Surveillance of Phone, Email Records

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

A top Brazilian official has expressed anger over the U.S.’s secret surveillance of telephone and email conversations in his South American country, The USA Today reports.

Foreign Minister Antonio Patriota said he’d learned that the NSA has subjected Brazilian residents to espionage through the widespread surveillance of phone and email records.

The USA Today wrote that Patriota and others are lobbying the U.N. to establish measures to protect countries from against unwanted surveillance.

The Office of the Director of National Intelligence responded: “The U.S. government will respond through diplomatic channels to our partners and allies in the Americas … While we are not going to comment publicly on specific alleged intelligence activities, as a matter of policy we have made clear that the United States gathers foreign intelligence of the type gathered by all nations.”

New Orleans Man Arrested for Sending Threatening Emails to FBI Agent That Referenced Agent’s Son


By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

We all get annoying emails – but these were apparently way over the top.

Authorities earlier this week arrested a New Orleans man for sending threatening emails to an FBI agent that referenced the agent’s son, according to the New Orleans Times-Picayune.

The paper reported that David Christenson Jr. , 53, was accused of sending the emails to FBI agent Steve Rayes on two occasions within a week

The emails came after Christenson ran into Rayes and his son in the Warehouse District in New Orleans on March 4, the paper reported, citing a police report. Rayes had interviewed the suspect in February over some inappropriate emails to judges and their employees, the paper reported.

The Times-Picayune reported that Christenson walked up to Rayes during the encounter in the Warehouse District “with a ‘wild, glazed look”on his face and tried to ask Rayes about his son, according to the police report. Rayes excused himself and kept walking with his son, the report said.”

The next day, Christenson allegedly sent  Rayes an email, according to l that said: “You have no idea how strange it was to run into you and your son last night … Your son is now connected to this bizarre story. Being connected to me is not usually a good thing. I am sorry. You and your son will be in my prayers.”

On March 11,  he sent another letter that allegedly said:  “You got your son involved. Why? … A lot of people who are connected (to) me are dying … YOU SHOULD ALL BE VERY CAREFUL.”

Justice Says Missing White House Emails Found

Funny how those emails seemed to turn up just at the right time.

By R. Jeffrey Smith
Washington Post Staff Writer
WASHINGTON — A Justice Department lawyer told a federal judge yesterday that the Bush administration will meet its legal requirement to transfer e-mails to the National Archives after spending more than $10 million to locate 14 million e-mails reported missing four years ago from White House computer files.
Civil division trial lawyer Helen H. Hong made the disclosure at a court hearing provoked by a 2007 lawsuit filed by outside groups to ensure that politically significant records created by the White House are not destroyed or removed before President Bush leaves office at noon on Tuesday. She said the department plans to argue in a court filing this week that the administration’s successful recent search renders the lawsuit moot.
Hong’s statement came hours after U.S. District Court Judge Henry H. Kennedy Jr. ordered employees of the president’s executive office — with just days to go before their departure — to undertake a comprehensive search of computer workstations, preserve portable hard drives and examine any e-mail archives created or retained from 2003 to 2005, the period in which e-mails appeared to be missing.
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