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Tag: economic espionage

FBI Lists Most Significant Cases of 2012

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

From espionage to cyber hacking, the FBI has taken on a lot of significant cases in 2012.

The following list was posted by the FBI.

Insider trading: Charges against seven investment professionals were announced in New York in January alleging an insider trading scheme that netted nearly $62 million in illegal profits. Details

California gang takedown: A total of 119 defendants were charged in San Diego in January with federal racketeering conspiracy, drug trafficking violations, and federal firearm offenses in one of the largest single gang takedowns in FBI San Diego history. The target was the Mexican Mafia gang and its affiliates.Details

Economic espionage: In February, a federal grand jury in San Francisco charged five individuals and five companies with economic espionage and theft of trade secrets in connection with their roles in a long-running effort to obtain U.S. trade secrets for the benefit of companies controlled by the People’s Republic of China. Details

Cyber hackers charged: Several hackers in the U.S. and abroad were charged in New York in March with cyber crimes affecting over a million victims. Four principal members of the hacking groups Anonymous and LulzSec were among those indicted; another key member previously pled guilty to similar charges. Details

Anchorage man indicted for murder: In April, Israel Keyes was charged with the kidnapping and murder of an Anchorage barista. Keyes is believed to have committed multiple kidnappings and murders across the country between 2001 and March 2012. In December, after Keyes committed suicide in jail, the FBI requested the public’s help regarding his other victims. Details

Financial fraudster receives 110-year sentence: In June, Allen Stanford—the former chairman of Stanford International Bank—was sentenced in Houston to 110 years in prison for orchestrating a 20-year investment fraud scheme in which he misappropriated $7 billion to finance his personal businesses.Details

Nationwide sweep recovers child victims of prostitution: The FBI and its partners announced the results of Operation Cross Country, a three-day law enforcement action in June in which 79 child victims of prostitution were recovered and more than 100 pimps were arrested. Details

International cyber takedown: Also in June, a two-year FBI undercover cyber operation culminated in the arrest of 24 individuals in eight countries. The investigation focused on “carding” crimes—offenses in which the Internet is used to steal victims’ credit card and bank account information—and was credited with protecting over 400,000 potential cyber crime victims and preventing over $205 million in losses.Details

Health care fraud: In July, global health care company GlaxoSmithKline pled guilty to fraud allegations and failure to report safety data and agreed to pay $3 billion in what officials called the largest health care fraud settlement in U.S. history. Details

Russian military procurement network: In October, 11 members of a Russian military procurement network operating in the United States and Russia, as well as a Texas-based export company and a Russia-based procurement firm, were indicted in New York and charged with illegally exporting high-tech microelectronics from the U.S. to Russian military and intelligence agencies. Details

FBI Ad Campaign Seeks Public Support Against Economic Espionage

Billboard from new awareness Campaign FBI photo

Shoshanna Utchenik
ticklethewire.com

A new FBI PR campaign seems to emphasize that spies in the modern age ain’t your Coldwar Commie.

The campaign includes billboards in major cities like the one pictured here, asking the public to be vigilant against spies who may be insiders, like the two Dupont employees charged this year for divulging trade secrets to China. China wanted the recipe for Dupont’s TiO2 white pigment for coloring paint, plastic and paper.

FBI Director Mueller just made a pitch to congress to renew FISA which allows the agency to conduct electronic surveillance on foreigners without a warrant, and CNET reports that the FBI is pushing for legislation to force social networks like Facebook and Twitter, email providers and peer-to-peer networks to become “wiretap friendly”.

Now the FBI is asking the public to pitch in. Perhaps you might spend your lunch break surveilling your cubicle mate for shenanigans.

The FBI’s press release for the new campaign offers warning signs to look for in your shifty coworkers.*

  • They work odd hours without authorization.
  • Without need or authorization, they take proprietary or other information home in hard copy form and/or on thumb drives, computer disks, or e-mail.
  • They unnecessarily copy material, especially if it’s proprietary or classified.
  • They disregard company policies about installing personal software or hardware, accessing restricted websites, conducting unauthorized searches, or downloading confidential material.
  • They take short trips to foreign countries for unexplained reasons.
  • They engage in suspicious personal contacts with competitors, business partners, or other unauthorized individuals.
  • They buy things they can’t afford.
  • They are overwhelmed by life crises or career disappointments.
  • They are concerned about being investigated, leaving traps to detect searches of their home or office or looking for listening devices or cameras.

If you suspect someone in your office may be committing economic espionage, report it to your corporate security officer and to your local FBI office, or submit a tip here.


Mass. Man Sentenced for Economic Espionage for Israel

By Danny Fenster
ticklethewire.com

Elliot Doxer has become Massachusetts’ first ever individual prosecuted for foreign economic espionage, according to a statement from the FBI.

Doxer was sentenced to six months in prison and six months of home confinement and electronic monitoring on Tuesday, as well as fined $25,000, after providing trade secrets to an undercover agent posing as an Israeli intelligence officer. Doxer  had previously plead guilty.

Doxer sent an e-mail to the folks at the  Boston’s Israeli Consulate in June of 2006 telling them he worked for the company Akamai Technologies, Inc., in the finance department, and wanted to provide whatever information he could “to help our homeland and our war against our enemies,” according to the statement. Doxer also asked to be paid for the risks he was taking.

A federal agents posing as an Israeli intelligence officer spoke to Doxer in Sept, 2007, establishing a “dead drop” where the two could exchange information. Doxer visited the dead drop at least 62 times between Oct. 2007 and March 2009, leaving information and checking for new communications.

Doxer provided the undercover agent with a list of the company’s customers, contracts with those customers, a full list of the company’s employees, with positions and contact information, and a broad description of the company’s physical and computer security systems. He also said he could travel to Israel or support special operations at home.

“We acknowledge the Government of Israel for their cooperation in this investigation, and underscore that the Information does not allege that the government of Israel or anyone acting on its behalf committed any offense under U.S. laws in this case,” said the FBI statement.