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Tag: Drug War

Guatemalan Drug Enforcement Improves; DEA Standing in the Shadows

By Danny Fenster
ticklethewire.com

Elio Lorenzana, on who’s head the U.S. government placed a $200,000 reward, was peacefully detained after a DEA-supported operation.

The lede of the story, on the website InSight (tagline: “Organized crime in the Americas”), reads: “Guatemala has now captured more top-level drug traffickers in the past two years than in the previous decade, no doubt thanks to pressure from the US.”

Elio Lorenzana was the youngest son of what the report called one of Guatemala’s most influential families–involed in both legitimate and illegitimate businesses, including narcotics running and drug trafficking.

The quiet arrest stands in contrast to five previous attempts, reports InSight; Guatemalan forces began pressuring the Lorenzana clan only after a US court indicted the family for drug trafficking in March of 2009.

The operation was part of a newly implemented strategy, wherein Guatemalan forces use less visible partnerships with the DEA, though the agency still plays a key advisory role.

To read more click here.

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST

AP Report Says Drug War Has Been a Failure

dea photo

dea photo

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

WASHINGTON — No question the protracted drug war America talks so often about has taken its toll on lives and on  urban, rural and suburban America. It’s also wreaked havoc along the Mexican border.

But the Associated Press has written a story saying the war after 40 years is a failure that has cost $1 trillion and hundreds of thousands of lives.

“In the grand scheme, it has not been successful,” U.S. Drug Czar Gil Kerlikowske told The Associated Press. “Forty years later, the concern about drugs and drug problems is, if anything, magnified, intensified.

To read more click here.

Mexican Army Using Torture in War on Drugs

One sure way to lose public support on the war on drugs in Mexico and the U.S. is to use torture. This is something both the U.S. and Mexico need to address if they hope to succeed.

mexico-border-sign

By Steve Fainaru and William Booth
Washington Post Foreign Service
PUERTO LAS OLLAS, Mexico — The Mexican army has carried out forced disappearances, acts of torture and illegal raids in pursuit of drug traffickers, according to documents and interviews with victims, their families, political leaders and human rights monitors.

From the violent border cities where drugs are brought into the United States to the remote highland regions where poppies and marijuana are harvested, residents and human rights groups describe an increasingly brutal war in which the government, led by the army, is using harsh measures to battle the cartels that continue to terrorize much of the country.

In Puerto Las Ollas, a mountain village of 50 people in the southern state of Guerrero, residents recounted how soldiers seeking information last month stuck needles under the fingernails of a disabled 37-year-old farmer, jabbed a knife into the back of his 13-year-old nephew, fired on a pastor, and stole food, milk, clothing and medication.

For Full Story

Violent Mexico Drug Cartels Reaching into Canada

The violent Mexican drug wars are spilling over the border into the U.S., particularly in border states. But now Canada is acknowledging that the violent activities are encroaching on the Canadian landscape. Now the question is: What to do?

COLIN FREEZE AND MARINA JIMÉNEZ
Toronto Globe and Mail
TORONTO — Mexico’s war on the drug cartels has become a national security issue for Canada, say Ottawa officials, as the violent backlash from the syndicates spills across the border into Canada and the U.S.

Security agencies, including the RCMP, the Canadian Security Intelligence Service, and the Integrated Threat Assessment Centre, are concerned an organized-crime problem could turn into a full-fledged national security threat.

One official, who asked to speak anonymously, explained that “it’s all part of this river of drugs – and we’re one of the subsidiary streams.

“It’s going to impact on us,” he said, adding the issue “does receive national attention.”
The Globe and Mail

This week, the RCMP publicly described a series of B.C. gang murders as a Canadian echo of the bloody feuds among the Mexican drug cartels, notorious for beheading their enemies and bribing corrupt local officials.

For Full Story

Related Story

Mexicans and Americans Getting Armor Plated Vehicles in Response to Violence (AP)

Columnist Says U.S. Better Step Up Efforts to Help Mexico In Violent Drug War

Michael Braun

Michael Braun

Some experts say the U.S. better get more proactive and help the Mexican government fight drugs. The consequences of not helping out enough could be devastating.

By Michael Braun
Security DeBrief

After I read Tony Kimery’s outstanding article in HSToday entitled, ‘Savage Struggle on the Border,’ I could not help but dwell on the irony and absurdity of what’s happening in both Mexico and the United States as a result of this war.
I am stunned by the fact that most Americans have paid little attention, if any at all, to the drug related violence in Mexico, and I’m even more concerned that they have not made the connection to the threat that this sustained bloodbath poses to our national security. If the brave Mexican law enforcement, military and security forces under President Calderon’s direction lose this ‘all or nothing’ fight with the cartels, Mexico will certainly become a narco-state, and life as we know it in both Mexico and the United States will change forever.
There were well over sixty beheadings in Mexico last year, yet the brutality being unleashed by the cartels is seldom deemed newsworthy by America’s media. However, if there were a beheading in Iraq or Afghanistan today by a Muslim extremist group, it would receive international coverage and would certainly receive global condemnation.

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