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Tag: Detroit

Cigar-Chomping-Mob Fighting Detroit Fed Prosecutor Keith Corbett Calling it Quits

He may not be one of kind, but he’s the last of a kind. Cigar chomping, Notre Dame fan, Corbett was a fixture in Detroit in the fight against the mob.

By David Ashenfelter
Detroit Free Press
DETROIT — The federal prosecutor who helped break the Detroit Mafia is calling it quits.
Keith Corbett, 59, the cigar-chomping assistant U.S. Attorney who ran the office’s Organized Crime Strike Force, said he plans to retire on Jan. 3 because of shifting priorities in the Justice Department and because, well, he’s worn out.
“I don’t want to be one of those old guys sitting around talking about the good old days and telling people how we used to do it,” Corbett told the Free Press. He said he hasn’t decided what he’ll do next.
Coworkers — as well as criminal lawyers who’ve matched wits with Corbett — said they’ll be sorry to see him go.
“He’s as good on his feet as any lawyer who ever walked into a courtroom,” said Detroit criminal lawyer Robert Morgan, a former federal prosecutor.
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Disastrous Real Estate Market Even Hurting Feds Efforts to Sell Seized Properties In Criminal Cases

There’s not much that the disastrous real estate market hasn’t impacted. Now we see it’s even hurting the feds ability to sell seized properties.

By Ed White
Associated Press
DETROIT – Federal prosecutors twice pursued a former autoworker suspected of running a multimillion-dollar drug operation. The first attempt fizzled when Clarence Carson died shortly after an indictment. The second? Blame it on the collapse of Detroit’s real-estate market.
The government recently abandoned a plan to sell nearly three dozen properties – land, houses and strip malls – believed to have been acquired by Carson through heroin, marijuana and cocaine sales.
“The market tanked,” Assistant U.S. Attorney Peter Ziedas said. “If we were able to effectively market these and come up with some kind of return, we would have done it.”
Like any seller, the U.S. Marshals Service, which is in charge of getting rid of assets grabbed by the Justice Department, is finding that location is the key to real estate these days.
“We are dealing with markets that have either declined slightly or tanked in different regions,” said Dave Turner, a Marshals Service spokesman in Washington.

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