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Tag: Detroit Police

Detroit Police End Relationship with DEA Task Force over Controversial Informant

By Steve Neavling.

By Steve Neavling

ticklethewire.com

Detroit police are pulling out of a DEA task force over the use of an informant who went on a killing spree.

Detroit Police Chief James Craig told The Detroit News that he pulled his officers from a DEA/Detroit police task force after meeting with Keith Martin, special agent in charge of the DEA’s operations in Michigan and Ohio.

“I said during the meeting I felt there was a breach of trust,” Craig said. “Because of this failure to acknowledge ownership that (Kenyel) Brown was signed as an informant working for the DEA/DPD task force, I’m pulling my officers from the task force.”

Detroit police had worked with the DEA for more than 20 years, the chief said.

Martin responded that the DEA is still “committed to working with the Detroit Police Department.”

The controversy involves the DEA’s use of Kenyel Brown, whom the task force paid $150 in October for information about a southwest Detroit gang dealing drugs.

Brown committed suicide by shooting himself in the head Monday as officers prepared to arrest him on allegations he was involved in six homicides, a shooting and two carjackings in Detroit and two suburbs.

Brown was kept out of prison while he was used as a federal informant, despite “multiple violations of his probation,” The Detroit News reported.

ICE Agent Fatally Shoots Detroit Man

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

DETROIT — A federal law enforcement agent shot and killed a man Monday on Detroit’s northwest side , WWJ reports.

WWJ reports that the agent with Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), was part of a joint federal task force that was serving an armed robbery warrant in the 9500 block of Evergreen near W. Chicago around 1 p.m.

WWJ reports that Detroit  Police Chief James Craig said the ICE agent, who  shot the man, about 20, was “responding to a threat.” He did not immediately elaborate. It was unclear if the man was armed.

WWJ’s Russ McNamara reported  that Craig was “trying to calm” neighbors at the scene who were demanding answers. Craig promised a thorough investigation.

“Let us do our job. We’ll do it as quick as we can. I don’t want this to be a two, three-month (investigation),” Craig said.

 

 

Legendary Tony Bertoni, Retired U.S. Marshal and Former Detroit Cop, Dies at 95

Tony Bertoni

By Ross Parker
ticklethewire.com

Anthony (Tony) Bertoni, a legendary law man both at the Detroit Police Department and as United States Marshal, died this past Sunday at the age of 95.

The Bertoni family grew up on the eastside of Detroit during the difficult years of post World War I and the Depression. Like many bright and capable young Irish Catholics of his day, Tony became a policeman in the Detroit Police Department. He was a courageous young officer who also had great people skills. He was well known for being able to solve problems for the people on his beat and precinct. His career was filled with awards and commendations for bravery and service.

His work ethic and recognized ability moved him steadily up through the ranks to the positions of Sergeant, Lieutenant, Captain, Inspector, Precinct Commander, and finally as Superintendant of the Department from 1973 to 1975.

In 1978 he was selected by President Carter to be the United States Marshal for the Eastern District of Michigan and was confirmed unanimously by the U. S. Senate. His selection was supported on a non-partisan basis as evidenced by his re-appointment for two terms by President Reagan. He served until 1990.

There were limited working ties between City and federal law enforcement systems at the time of his appointment, especially above the street level. One of his many accomplishments was to help bridge this gap and encourage cooperation, joint task forces, and constructive dialogue at the management and command level.

Tony quickly became the dean of the federal law enforcement leadership community. He helped U. S. Attorney Jim Robinson establish a Federal Law Enforcement Council, which met monthly to discuss common problems and resolve differences. He also was one of the first to help plan and participate in the Great Lakes Division of the Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Force.

At these and other forums, when Tony talked everyone listened, His counsel was pragmatic, never argumentative of self-aggrandizing, but always with generous common sense and a full understanding of the concerns of everyone involved.

One of his many attributes was a genuine respect for all with whom he came in contact, from the newest Deputy Marshal to every member of the federal bench. You never heard an unkind or critical word about Marshal Bertoni.

In some ways Tony stood for old fashioned morality and values. Ethics and principles were paramount to him, and he had little sympathy for those who had betrayed the public trust or were habitual slackers. Loyalty, hard work, dedication to the positive goals of his various endeavors—these were the unquestioned values in his public service.

But he also recognized the need to overcome historical inequities in law enforcement and to promote progress and more modern methods. Having lived through the events of the summer of 1967 in Detroit as a District Inspector, he supported the advancement of qualified African American officers and deputies.

Likewise, although always the chivalrous gentleman, he was as gender neutral on the job as the most progressive law enforcement managers of his generation. Female AUSAs in particular seemed to like to work with him. Of course, he was the best looking guy in the U. S. Courthouse.

Tony wasn’t all about work. Most of all, he loved his wife, Frances, and his large family of 6 children, 12 grandchildren, and 22 great grandchildren. Like all patriarchs, he fretted over their struggles and was proud of their accomplishments. He was an excellent fisherman and a day on the lake with a family member was a joy to him.

He also was a man of quiet faith and a proud Italian American, who enjoyed talking about their many accomplishments in helping to build the City of Detroit.

For the rest of us, nothing was more enjoyable than eating a slow lunch at Roma’s Café with him. It was common for politicians, businesspeople, and beat cops to stop at his table, pay their respects and share a story or two about the old days. But the best storyteller was always Tony, who had an encyclopedic memory of the people and events in Detroit during the 20th Century. The stories were an oral history of the City, always fun and illuminating. One left these lunches reluctantly but with the feeling that you had chosen right to be part of the law enforcement fraternity with someone like Tony.

It is fitting that Tony’s long and well lived life extended into 2015, the bicentennial year of the first U. S. Marshal in the Michigan Territory, Thomas Roland, appointed in 1815 by President Madison.

Tony Bertoni would have been a lion in any generation. We are so fortunate that he chose ours. He was the epitome of the best in law enforcement, the best counselor and the best friend.

 

Parker: Legendary Tony Bertoni, Retired U.S. Marshal and Former Detroit Cop, Dies at 95

Tony Bertoni

Ross Parker was chief of the criminal division in the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Detroit for 8 years and worked as an AUSA for 28 in that office.
 
By Ross Parker
ticklethewire.com

Anthony (Tony) Bertoni, a legendary law man both at the Detroit Police Department and as United States Marshal, died this past Sunday at the age of 95.

The Bertoni family grew up on the eastside of Detroit during the difficult years of post World War I and the Depression. Like many bright and capable young Irish Catholics of his day, Tony became a policeman in the Detroit Police Department. He was a courageous young officer who also had great people skills. He was well known for being able to solve problems for the people on his beat and precinct. His career was filled with awards and commendations for bravery and service.

His work ethic and recognized ability moved him steadily up through the ranks to the positions of Sergeant, Lieutenant, Captain, Inspector, Precinct Commander, and finally as Superintendant of the Department from 1973 to 1975.

In 1978 he was selected by President Carter to be the United States Marshal for the Eastern District of Michigan and was confirmed unanimously by the U. S. Senate. His selection was supported on a non-partisan basis as evidenced by his re-appointment for two terms by President Reagan. He served until 1990.

There were limited working ties between City and federal law enforcement systems at the time of his appointment, especially above the street level. One of his many accomplishments was to help bridge this gap and encourage cooperation, joint task forces, and constructive dialogue at the management and command level.

Tony quickly became the dean of the federal law enforcement leadership community. He helped U. S. Attorney Jim Robinson establish a Federal Law Enforcement Council, which met monthly to discuss common problems and resolve differences. He also was one of the first to help plan and participate in the Great Lakes Division of the Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Force.

At these and other forums, when Tony talked everyone listened, His counsel was pragmatic, never argumentative of self-aggrandizing, but always with generous common sense and a full understanding of the concerns of everyone involved.

One of his many attributes was a genuine respect for all with whom he came in contact, from the newest Deputy Marshal to every member of the federal bench. You never heard an unkind or critical word about Marshal Bertoni.

In some ways Tony stood for old fashioned morality and values. Ethics and principles were paramount to him, and he had little sympathy for those who had betrayed the public trust or were habitual slackers. Loyalty, hard work, dedication to the positive goals of his various endeavors—these were the unquestioned values in his public service.

But he also recognized the need to overcome historical inequities in law enforcement and to promote progress and more modern methods. Having lived through the events of the summer of 1967 in Detroit as a District Inspector, he supported the advancement of qualified African American officers and deputies.

Likewise, although always the chivalrous gentleman, he was as gender neutral on the job as the most progressive law enforcement managers of his generation. Female AUSAs in particular seemed to like to work with him. Of course, he was the best looking guy in the U. S. Courthouse.

Tony wasn’t all about work. Most of all, he loved his wife, Frances, and his large family of 6 children, 12 grandchildren, and 22 great grandchildren. Like all patriarchs, he fretted over their struggles and was proud of their accomplishments. He was an excellent fisherman and a day on the lake with a family member was a joy to him.

He also was a man of quiet faith and a proud Italian American, who enjoyed talking about their many accomplishments in helping to build the City of Detroit.

For the rest of us, nothing was more enjoyable than eating a slow lunch at Roma’s Café with him. It was common for politicians, businesspeople, and beat cops to stop at his table, pay their respects and share a story or two about the old days. But the best storyteller was always Tony, who had an encyclopedic memory of the people and events in Detroit during the 20th Century. The stories were an oral history of the City, always fun and illuminating. One left these lunches reluctantly but with the feeling that you had chosen right to be part of the law enforcement fraternity with someone like Tony.

It is fitting that Tony’s long and well lived life extended into 2015, the bicentennial year of the first U. S. Marshal in the Michigan Territory, Thomas Roland, appointed in 1815 by President Madison.

Tony Bertoni would have been a lion in any generation. We are so fortunate that he chose ours. He was the epitome of the best in law enforcement, the best counselor and the best friend.

 

Fox2: Off-Duty FBI Agent Almost Shoots Detroit Cop in ‘Lame Brain’ Incident

 By Allan Lengel
Deadline Detroit

DETROIT — Here’s a story that’s very bizarre and dangerous.

Fox2’s Charlie LeDuff reports that an off-duty FBI agent almost shot a Detroit cop on Wednesday at a gas station in Detroit in the Corktown area during a “lame brain” incident.

He reports that the Detroit Police Department was simulating a purse snatching at the station at Michigan Avenue and 11th Street so WDIV could film peoples’ reaction. WDIV was trying to produce an instructive segment to educate the public on safety and crime prevention.

Problem was that an off-duty FBI agent was filling up and witnessed the plain-clothed cop snatching the purse from a WDIV associate. He had no idea it wasn’t real, LeDuff reports. So the FBI agent gave chase to the cop and pulled out a gun, according LeDuff’s report.

The immediate supervisor of these cops had no idea this was happening until they called him.

LeDuff reports:

“The event takes place. The officer takes the purse, runs around the gas station. As he’s running, an off-duty FBI agent is pumping gas. He witnesses the whole thing. He gives chase. He pulls his weapon, and as he turns the corner around the gas station, he’s stopped by another officer, who identifies herself as a police officer and don’t shoot, don’t shoot, this is a scenario,” said Inspector Shawn Gargalino with the Detroit Police Department.

That is the same description of events we got from four other ranking law enforcement officials, including Lieutenant Chuck Flannagan, a 28-year veteran of DPD.

To read more click here.

 

A Twist in ATF Task Force Shooting May Make ‘Friendly Fire’ Issue More Complicated

ATF task force members blocked in suspect's car in Detroit.

By Allan Lengel
Deadline Detroit

DETROIT — Investigators are trying to determine if one of two wounded Detroit cops on an ATF task force was injured as a result of friendly fire in a shootout with a murder suspect last week on the city’s west side.

That may not be easy.

Law enforcement sources familiar with the investigation being conducted by Detroit Police and Michigan State Police say the officer suffered injuries to the head from metal-like fragments that may not be from a bullet. Instead, the fragments may have come from something like metal from a car that was struck by a bullet, sources said.

Authorities say that Matthew Joseph, 23, a murder suspect who was on parole for an armed robbery conviction, opened fire on task force members as they tried to arrest him by blocking his car at Linwood and Hooker shortly after 6 p.m. last Tuesday. Officers returned fire and killed him.

Sources say Joseph had a .40-caliber gun, the same caliber Detroit police use. One officer was shot twice in the leg. The officer who suffered head injuries remains in Ford Hospital in serious condition.

To read more click here. 

2 Detroit Cops on ATF Task Force Shot and Wounded by Parolee

Suspect Matthew Joseph was fatally shot

By Allan Lengel and Bill McGraw
Deadline Detroit

DETROIT — The man suspected of shooting and wounding two Detroit police officers on Tuesday evening following a car chase on the city’s west side, had been on parole since last October after serving time for armed robbery, according to a law enforcement official and public records.

Matthew Renard Joseph, 23, of Detroit, was under surveillance Tuesday for a March 28, narcotics-related homicide, a source said. In the end, he was fatally shot by law enforcement.

The surveillance, which began shortly before 6 p.m. in the 3700 block of 25th Street, turned into a car chase. After police boxed Joseph’s car in at Linwood and Hooker, they got out of the car, law enforcement sources said.

Joseph then opened fire, striking one officer in the head and the other twice in the leg. Law enforcement shot back, killing him, authorities said. Two people in the suspect’s car, a man and a woman, were taken into custody, Detroit Police said.

To read full story click here.

Detroit Police Investigated for Role in Providing Help to Sex Club

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Federal authorities are investigating whether on-duty Detroit police provided limo service and security to a swanky sex club a few blocks from the department’s Central District headquarters, the Detroit News reports.

Citing sources familiar with the probe, the Detroit News wrote that a federal investigation is underway following complaints about police helping the swingers’ club while on duty.

“The feds were asking me about a group of officers who supposedly were giving limo service to people at this sex club while they were on duty,” one Detroit police official told the Detroit News. “The big sticking point they were concentrating on was whether the officers were on-duty when they were driving people to and from this club.”

The probe began following complaints that the Forest Club was selling alcohol without a license.