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Tag: databases

Long-Serving Border Patrol Chief to Retire After 25 Years, Reflects on Advances

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com


Chief Enrique “Henry” Mendiola Jr., whose 25 year of service makes him one of the longest-serving agents of the Border Patrol RGV Sector, is retiring, ValleyCentral.com reports.

Mendiola was only 20 years old when he joined the Border Patrol in 1988.

“When I came in we were still doing ink fingerprints, we had no databases, not even computers,” Mendiola said.

A lot has changed since then. The number of agents has increased 500%, and apprehensions have declined, he told ValleyCentral.com.

“We have made a lot of progress.  Apprehensions are well under the million range where they were back then,” Mendiola said.

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FBI Agents Get Leeway to Push Privacy Bounds

city of chester photo

By Charlie Savage
The New York Times

WASHINGTON — The Federal Bureau of Investigation is giving significant new powers to its roughly 14,000 agents, allowing them more leeway to search databases, go through household trash or use surveillance teams to scrutinize the lives of people who have attracted their attention.

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The F.B.I. soon plans to issue a new edition of its manual, called the Domestic Investigations and Operations Guide, according to an official who has worked on the draft document and several others who have been briefed on its contents. The new rules add to several measures taken over the past decade to give agents more latitude as they search for signs of criminal or terrorist activity.

The F.B.I. recently briefed several privacy advocates about the coming changes. Among them, Michael German, a former F.B.I. agent who is now a lawyer for the American Civil Liberties Union, argued that it was unwise to further ease restrictions on agents’ power to use potentially intrusive techniques, especially if they lacked a firm reason to suspect someone of wrongdoing.

To read full story click here.