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Tag: CIA

Justice Dept. Review of CIA Detainee Abuse to Focus on Small Number of Cases

This will continue to be a political hot potato. But it seems that the Justice Dept. should look into cases in which CIA employees went beyond the guidelines of interrogation.

torture 2

By Carrie Johnson, Jerry Markon and Julie Tate
Washington Post Staff Writers
WASHINGTON — The Justice Department’s review of detainee abuse by the CIA will focus on a very small number of cases, including at least one in which an Afghan prisoner died at a secret facility, according to two sources briefed on the matter.

On Friday, seven former CIA directors urged President Obama to end the inquiry, arguing that it would inhibit intelligence operations in the future and demoralize agency employees who believed they had been cleared by previous investigators.

For Full Story

Ex-Atty. Gen. Gonzales Backpedaling on Support of CIA Probe

Here’s what Alberto Gonzales originally said: “We obviously worked very hard during the Bush administration to establish ground rules to establish parameters about how to deal with terrorists, because we’re a nation of laws, and if people go beyond that, I think it is legitimate to question and examine that conduct to ensure people are held accountable for their actions, even if it’s action in prosecuting the war on terror and trying to protect America.”

Now he’s backpedaling. Not surprising. It seems everyone  in the Bush administration who criticizes the  administration or goes against its policies ends up recanting or clarifying or correcting what they said.

Alberto Gonzales

Alberto Gonzales

By Ben Conery
Washington Times
WASHINGTON — Former Attorney General Alberto R. Gonzales said Thursday that his previous assertion that it was “legitimate to question and examine” charges of CIA abuses of suspected terrorists did not mean he endorsed such an investigation.

“Contrary to press reporting and based on the information that’s available to me,” Mr. Gonzales said during an interview Thursday with The Washington Times, “I don’t support the investigation by the department because this is a matter that has already been reviewed thoroughly and because I believe that another investigation is going to harm our intelligence gathering capabilities and that’s a concern that’s shared by career intelligence officials and so for those reasons I respectfully disagree with the decision.”

Ex-Atty. Gen. Alberto Gonzales Supports Probe of CIA Torture

Alberto Gonzales

Alberto Gonzales

It’s almost shocking that Alberto Gonzales would break ranks with folks like Dick Cheney. But it’s heartening to see that he’s capable of exercising some independence now that he’s not under the thumb of such strong personalities as Cheney.

By Jeremy Pelofsky
Reuters

U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder has been under fire in some circles for naming a special prosecutor to investigate alleged abuses of prisoners by CIA interrogators or contractors, but on Tuesday he got some unexpected support from a former Bush administration official.

Former Attorney General Alberto Gonzales who oversaw the Justice Department or was White House counsel during the period when some of the controversial interrogation techniques were authorized – such as lengthy sleep deprivation and repeated waterboarding – in a radio interview backed Holder’s decision to review the cases that went outside the limits set.

For Full Story

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST

Two Get Life for Las Vegas Bombing (AP)

Fed Prosecutor In CIA Torture Probe Fearless and Highly Ethical

Fearless. Uncompromising Ethics. It sounds like the Justice Dept. has picked the right guy to look into the CIA’s alleged torture tactics.

cia-logo

By Jenna Russell and Shelley Murphy
Boston Globe Staff

He is known for his fearlessness and uncompromising ethics and he became a go-to prosecutor for complex and thankless tasks: investigating federal agents, convicting a former governor, probing the CIA’s alleged destruction of evidence.

Now John H. Durham’s steely sense of justice will be tested again with the assignment given to him Monday by the Justice Department – examining the abuse of prisoners held by the Central Intelligence Agency and deciding whether to recommend a full investigation of the interrogators’ tactics.

For Full Story

(Practice) Drama Breaks Out in Washington Area for Agencies Like Secret Service, FBI and U.S. Marshals

The drama around around Washington, thanks goodness, in these instances is not real. It’s just practice for the different federal agencies. You can never be too ready. You can never practice too much.

istock photo

istock photo

By Laura Blumenfeld
Washington Post Staff Writer
WASHINGTON — Five minutes before his job interview, John Fisher parks at Ace Fire Extinguisher Services in College Park, his window open and his stomach jumpy. He is nibbling on spoonfuls of cottage cheese when shouts erupt from the car next to his.

“Gun! He has a gun!” a man with a Secret Service earpiece yells, riffling through the glove compartment.

“It’s my brother’s gun!” a man in a black ski cap growls. “I didn’t know I had a gun!”

Fisher’s eyes pop. He slides down in his seat, cranking his window closed.

“Hands behind your back,” says the man from the Secret Service, ratcheting his handcuffs.

“Man,” says Fisher, wiping a spray of white flecks from his chin. He crosses the street to his job interview. “Did I pull up to the wrong spot.”

Unwittingly, Fisher had driven into the climactic scene in a secret world of shadow theatrics. The man in the ski cap is a stage actor; the agent with the earpiece is a Secret Service recruit.

Every day, as Washingtonians go about their overt lives, the FBI, CIA, Capitol Police, Secret Service and U.S. Marshals Service stage covert dramas in and around the capital where they train.

For Full Story

Judges Says CIA Committed Fraud in Defending Wiretap Case Against DEA Agent

Between water boarding and withholding info from Congress, the CIA doesn’t really need more bad publicity. But here it is.

Ex-CIA Chief Tenet Could Face Sanctions/gov photo
Ex-CIA Chief Tenet Could Face Sanctions/gov photo

By Del Quentin Wilber
Washington Post Staff Writer
WASHINGTON – A federal judge has ruled that government officials committed fraud while defending a lawsuit brought by a former DEA agent who accused a CIA operative of illegally bugging his home.

In rulings unsealed Monday, U.S. District Chief Judge Royce C. Lamberth wrote that he was considering sanctions against five current and former agency lawyers and officials, including former director George J. Tenet, for withholding key information about the operative’s covert status.

The rulings, issued in recent months, highlighted what the judge called fraudulent work by CIA lawyers in defending a suit that Lamberth said had a lengthy and “twisted history.” Brought in 1994 by DEA agent Richard A. Horn, the suit alleged that the CIA illegally bugged his residence in Rangoon, Burma, while he was serving in the country.

For Full Story

CIA Officer Accused of Rape Claimed to be an FBI Agent At One Point

cia

This guy sounded like big big trouble. Who knows what he got away with when he was overseas.

By Jeff Stein
Spy Talk
WASHINGTON — Andrew Warren, the former CIA officer accused of date rape in Algiers late last year, caused such a ruckus over parking dispute at a Washington, D.C. hotel three years earlier that the matter was referred to the FBI.

Multiple sources said Warren flashed official credentials and claimed to be an FBI agent during the dispute, which took place in late 2004 or early 2005 when he was escorting Egyptian intelligence officials on an official visit to the CIA.

Warren was a senior CIA operative in Egypt at the time, said the sources, which include two senior former spy agency experts on the region, who demanded anonymity in exchange for discussing the matter.

For Full Story

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST

Prosecutors Want Grand Jury Testimony Released For Sentencing To Show Just How Corrupt CIA Official Was

Kyle Foggo/msnbc

Kyle Foggo/msnbc

It seems the public has a right to know. But does that include grand jury material after trial? The prosecutors say yes.

MATTHEW BARAKAT
AP News

Kyle “Dusty” Foggo is the highest ranking officer in the history of the CIA to be convicted of a federal crime, admitting he abused his influence to steer contracts toward an old friend who showered him with vacations, gourmet dinners and other gifts.
But if the public knew the full extent of his misconduct, they would be outraged, prosecutors said Friday as they urged a judge to make public secret grand jury testimony in the case against Foggo.
Foggo was appointed in 2004 to be the agency’s executive director and third-ranking officer under then-director Porter Goss. Foggo resigned in 2006 as he came under investigation.
Prosecutor Jason Forge told U.S. District Judge James Cacheris that the public has a right to know the depth of Foggo’s misconduct and they want the judge to consider the transcripts during sentencing.

For Full Story