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Tag: CIA

FBI Issues Bulletin to Law Enforcement Following Release of CIA Torture Report

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The FBI released a bulletin to law enforcement following the disclosure Tuesday that the CIA tortured terrorism suspects.

Here is the bulletin, written by Jeremy W. Francis:

Following the September 11, 2001 attacks on the United States, law enforcement agencies engaged in the Global War on Terrorism. Police officers, along with firefighters and emergency medical personnel, were the first to respond during the largest loss of civilian life from violent acts of terrorism in America’s history. In the decade following, law enforcement leaders agreed that police departments were not as prepared as they could have been to respond to a terrorist attack.

During the initial response to an incident, no level of administration is more important than the local government. State, county, and municipal law enforcement officers will be the first to respond should an event occur. Therefore, law enforcement agencies should be better prepared today than they were before September 11.

In the author’s survey of 31 municipal and county law enforcement organizations, 41.2% of senior executives—chiefs of police and sheriffs—communicated that they are no better prepared to respond to a terrorist attack today. The majority of leaders reported that their agency’s overall readiness was average or above average; however, 22.5 percent of executives stated that their department’s ability to respond to terrorism measured below average or inadequate. This indicates that improvements are necessary to increase the preparedness posture of law enforcement agencies.

Organizational culture and challenges correlate to terrorism preparedness. One mechanism to improve preparedness in law enforcement agencies is to enhance the culture of operational readiness. When leaders apply change through the organization’s culture, the likelihood of positive results increases.

Tangible, overt, or verbally identifiable elements in an organization are called artifacts. The artifacts of law enforcement organizational culture are examined further as 1) processes— communication, planning, and training; 2) resources—spending and equipment; and 3) personnel. These are the most visible and straightforward elements to increase change in the organization.

The author’s research demonstrated that positive organizational culture improves operational preparedness. This inclination enhances an agency’s ability to respond to a terrorist attack. This occurs because organizational change through culture reduces resistance and increases readiness.

To read more click here.

Senate Torture Report Condemns C.I.A. Interrogation Program

By Mark Mazzetti
New York Times

WASHINGTON — A scathing report released by the Senate Intelligence Committee on Tuesday found that the Central Intelligence Agency routinely misled the White House and Congress about the information it obtained from the detention and interrogation of terrorism suspects, and that its methods were more brutal than the C.I.A. acknowledged either to Bush administration officials or to the public.

The long-delayed report, which took five years to produce and is based on more than six million internal agency documents, is a sweeping indictment of the C.I.A.’s operation and oversight of a program carried out by agency officials and contractors in secret prisons around the world in the years after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. It also provides a macabre accounting of some of the grisliest techniques that the C.I.A. used to torture and imprison terrorism suspects.

To read the full story click here.

Former CIA Director Petraeus’ Career Comeback May Be Dashed by FBI Investigation

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

By most accounts, David Petraeus is on the rise after losing his job in the wake of an extramarital affair that forced him to resign as director of the CIA.

But Bloomberg reports that Petraeus, who has secured a job at the private equity firm KKR, is still under investigation by the FBI.

Citing current and former U.S. intelligence officials, Bloomberg wrote that the FBI is still trying to determine whether Petraeus violated the law by providing classified documents to Paula Broadwell, his biographer and former lover.

Authorities said Broadwell received intelligence information that was only available to a handful of senior officials.

“It was inappropriately shared and it should never have been shared,” one former senior intelligence official said.

Despite the investigation, President Obama has defended Petraeus, saying he never endangered national security.

Judge: Jill Kelly May Press Forward with Lawsuit Against FBI Over Invasion of Privacy

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

Jill Kelley may continue pursuing her lawsuit against the FBI over the scandal involving former CIA Director David Patraeus, a judge ruled Monday.

The New York Daily News reports that U.S. District Judge Amy Berman declined to dismiss a case by Kelly, who claims the FBI and Justice Department violated her privacy by leaking personal information about her to the media.

The case came to light when Kelly told the FBI in 2012 that she had been receiving harassing emails, which turned out to be from Paula Broadwell, who was having an affair with Patraeus.

Soon after, the news media obtained personal information about Kelley.

The judge’s decision, however, does not touch the merits of the case.

 

14 Pulitzer Prize Winners Ask Justice Department Not to Jail Reporter

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

More than a dozen Pulitzer Prize winners urged the Justice Department on Monday to stop trying to force New York Times reporter and author James Risen to identify a confidential source, the US News reports.

Risen has said he’d go to jail before testifying at the trial of former CIA employee Jeffrey Sterling, who is accused of providing a tip for Risen’s book, “State of War: The Secret History of the CIA and the Bush Administration.”

Prosecutors allege Risen divulged a CIA scheme to provide flawed nuclear weapons designs to Iran.

Fourteen Pulitzer Prize winners issued a statement in support of Risen.

“Enough is enough,” said three-time Pulitzer Prize winner David Barstow of The New York Times. “The relentless and by all appearances vindictive effort by two administrations to force Jim Risen into betraying his sources has already done substantial and lasting damage to journalism in the United States. I’ve felt the chill firsthand. Trusted sources in Washington are scared to talk by telephone, or by email, or even to meet for coffee, regardless of whether the subject touches on national security or not.”

New Jersey Senator Says He’s Victim of Cuban Plot to Smear Him with False Allegations about Prostitutes

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Sen. Robert Menendez is urging the Justice Department to investigate what he claims was an elaborate smear campaign by Cuban operatives to destroy his reputation with lies about prostitutes, the Washington Post reports.

The New Jersey Democrat, a vociferous critic of Castro’s regime, said Cuban officials created a fake tipster to claim that Memendez was partying with underage prostitutes while vacationing at his Dominican Republic home of a friend.

According to officials familiar with the case, the CIA found evidence that Cuban agents fabricated a tipster.

The allegations came out publicly in November 2012, when a conservative website quoted two Dominican women who claimed to have sex with Menendez.

New York Times Reporter, Author Faces Jail Time If He Refuses to Testify About Book Leak

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A New York Times reporter may face jail time if he refuses to testify about who leaked information to him for a book he wrote on the botched CIA operation in Iran.

The New York Times reports that James Risen, author of “State of War,” has steadfastly refused to testify, but he has run out of legal challenges, leading up to “the most serious confrontation between the government and the press in recent history.”

Reporter James Risen

Risen faces the possibility of prison time if he refuses to testify.

The government’s handling of the case will set a precedent, experts said.

“If the government proceeds and pursues the subpoena, especially if Mr. Risen goes to jail or is fined at some intolerable level, it will deal a withering blow to reporting that runs against the government’s wishes,” said Steven Aftergood, who studies government secrecy for the nonprofit Federation of American Scientists.

New York Times journalist Judith Miller was jailed for 85 days for refusing to testify about a CIA leak in 2005, the last time a reporter was imprisoned for not divulging information.

Feds Prepare Release of Thousands of Investigative Files on Folk Singer Peter Seeger

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Beloved folk singer Pete Seeger was subject to secret FBI and CIA surveillance since the 1940s and was even blacklisted for his political beliefs in the McCarthy era.

Since Seeger’s death in January at the age of 94, the National Archives and Records Administration has been preparing to release thousands of investigative files of Seeger, under the Freedom of Information Act, AlJazeera America reports.

The request for Seeger’s files was so popular that NARA is waiving the administrative fee of at least $2,000.

“As soon as possible, NARA will post this file online,” NARA spokeswoman Miriam Kleinman said. “We are waiting for review to be complete.”