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Tag: book

New Book Chronicles True Story of TSA Agent Who Saved Baby’s Life

TSA Agent Cecilia Morales

By Steve Neavling

A new children’s book explores the true story of a rookie TSA agent who leaped over a conveyor belt at Newark Liberty International Airport to save a baby who wasn’t breathing. 

The book, “Baby’s Breath,” was published by J2B Publishing and written by James Brewster. It’s available for $10.99.

The author told Southern Maryland News that he took a creative writing class with his wife at College of Southern Maryland.

The book tells the story of Cecilia Morales, a trained emergency medical technician who joined TSA in late October 2021. She sprung to action when a mother screamed for help. Morales shouted instructions to the mother, “but she was so nervous and I knew if I didn’t get over there, it wasn’t going to be a good outcome.”

“I jumped over the checkpoint conveyor belt rollers and she gave me the baby,” Morales said in a news release at the time “I performed the infant Heimlich maneuver on him.”

Holding the 2-month-old baby to keep his airway open, Morales patted him on the back. After the first effort failed, she did it again, and the baby began to breathe again. 

As an EMT, Morales previously saved adults and children with the Heimlich, but she never tried it on a baby. 

Excerpt from the book:

“The mother looked up at Officer Kate.

“Thank you for saving my baby,” she said. “Thank God you were here. Thank you, thank you!”

Officer Kate thanked God that she had remembered her training for saving the baby. Officer Kate stood up straight and looked the mother in the eye. She gave a quick salute, and said, “Glad to do it!”

Barr Slams Mueller’s ‘Heavy-Handed Criminal Investigation’ in forthcoming Memoir

Former Attorney General William Barr, via Justice Department.

By Steve Neavling

Former U.S. Attorney General William Barr in his forthcoming memoir criticizes the special counsel probe of Russia and former President Trump’s campaign, calling it a “heavy-handed criminal investigation.”

Barr’s book, “One Damn Thing After Another: Memoirs of an Attorney General,” takes aim at special counsel Robert Mueller, calling him “the wrong person to investigate it,” Yahoo News reports.

“But he never seemed to have stopped to examine whether there was an adequate basis for pursuing either a counterintelligence or criminal investigation,” Barr writes. 

According to an FBI agent, Barr says, “after Mueller came in, the office quickly developed a ‘Get Trump’ attitude and began with a preexisting conviction that there must be ‘something criminal.” 

Barr also slammed Mueller for staffing his office with Democrats. 

“The whole purpose of appointing Mueller was to assure the public that partisanship would not be involved in the investigation,” Barr wrote. “Mueller defeated the very purpose of his appointment. His staffing decisions engendered deep distrust in half the country. Based on later information about the way the investigation was conducted, those fears were not wholly unjustified.”

Barr said one “glaring omission” of Mueller’s investigation was failing to examine the credibility of Christopher Steele’s dossier. 

“Even though Mueller was supposed to investigate Russian efforts to interfere in the election, he never seemed to have explored the possibility that Steele’s dossier was used as a vector for Russian disinformation,” Barr wrote.

Near the end of the book, Barr describes Mueller’s “trembling” hands and “tremulous” voice, questioning whether Muller “might have an illness,” The New York Times reports.

Wray told Schiff He’d Resign Before Doing ‘Something That Wasn’t Right’ for Trump

FBI Director Christopher Wray in Atlanta. Photo via FBI.

By Steve Neavling

FBI Director Chris Wray was prepared to step down if then-President Trump demanded he do “something that wasn’t right.”

That’s according to U.S. Rep. Adam Schiff in his new memoir, “Midnight in Washington: How We Almost Lost Our Democracy and Still Could,” Business Insider reports.

“In one of our first meetings, I had warned (Wray) about how many good people the president had chewed up and spat out,” Schiff wrote.

“I don’t need this job,” Wray responded, according to the book. “And I would leave it before I ever felt the need to do something that wasn’t right.”

Schiff described Wray as “one of the few remaining agency heads appointed by Trump who was still willing to speak truth to power.”

Schiff, who was the top Democrat on the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, said Wray “defended the men and women of the bureau, answered questions in a straightforward manner, and never dissembled.”

“He didn’t go out of his way to contradict the president, but he nonetheless maintained a high level of integrity,” Schiff wrote.

Former Trump Press Secretary Reveals Secret Service Nicknamed Melania Trump ‘Rapunzel’

File photo via Secret Service.

By Steve Neavling

The Secret Service nicknamed Melania Trump “Rapunzel” because she rarely left the White House, according to a new book by former press secretary Stephanie Grisham.  

Agents requested working with Melania because it gave them more time to work with their families, Grisham writes in the the book, “I’ll Take Your Questions Now,” The Washington Post reports.

Grisham describes Melania as stubborn and so obsessed with self-care that she donned a robe and slippers as soon as she boarded Air Force One. 

She spent a lot of her time with her son Barron or her parents. 

When Trump’s alleged affair with porn star Stormy Daniel was publicized, Melania tried to embarrass her husband. At one point, she walked arm-in-arm with a handsome military aide during the first State of the Union address because, Melania insisted, the Capitol floors were slippery. 

“I laughed to myself because I’d seen the woman navigate dirt roads in her heels,” Grisham writes.

J. Edgar Hoover’s Former Assistant Reveals Complex Character of FBI’s First Director in New Book

By Steve Neavling

The former assistant of J. Edgar Hoover has written a book about the FBI’s first director. 

“The Director: My Years Assisting J. Edgar Hoover” was written by Paul Letersky, who later became a field agent in Cincinnati and Alexandria, Va.

The book explores Letersky’s two years as Hoover’s assistant and then his time as a field agent. 

“Letersky offers less a historical breakthrough than finer brushstrokes on an American icon, whom the author describes as kind, courteous, formal, thoughtful, fearless, occasionally funny, a perfect gentleman and a devout patriot,” The Associated Press writes in a review of the book. “He also could be vindictive, closed-minded, hypocritical and a holder of eternal grudges who sincerely thought he was serving his country. In his later years, however, Hoover apparently was oblivious to ethical lapses such as bugging the Rev. Martin Luther King’s hotel rooms.”

According to the book, Hoover was a workaholic who dedicated his life to the FBI. He was a tough boss who demanded accountability, and he had no tolerance for out-of-shape agents. 

Black Secret Service Agent Told Trump It Was ‘Offensive’ to Hold Rally in Tulsa on Juneteenth

President Trump at Indiana rally.

By Steve Neavling

A Black Secret Service agent called out former President Trump for scheduling a rally in Tulsa on Juneteenth last year. 

The exchange was detailed in an upcoming book from Michael C. Bender, “Frankly, We Did Win This Election: The Inside Story of How Trump Lost,” Politico reports.

Theagent told Trump that it was “offensive” to hold a political rally on the holiday, which commemorates the day when slaves in Texas learned about the end of slavery.  

According to the book, Trump asked the agent about Juneteenth. 

“Yes, I know what it is,” the agent told Trump.

Later that day, Trump announced on Twitter that he was changing the date of the rally. 

New Book Chronicles Missteps, Successes of Secret Service

File photo via Secret Service.

By Steve Neavling

President Trump sought to remove Secret Service personnel who he believed was overweight or short. 

Vanessa Trump, the ex-wife of Donald Trump’s eldest son, dated a Secret Service agent shortly after her divorce with Donald Trump Jr.

And during the Sept. 11 terrorist attack, Secret Service agents were unable to get Vice President Dick Cheney immediately to safety in an underground bunker because they forgot the S-keys to open the shelter. 

These are some of the takeaways in “Zero Fail: The Rise and Fall of the Secret Service,” a new book by Washington Post reporter and Pulitzer Prize winner Carol D. Leonnig. The book will be released to the public next week. 

The Washington Post obtained an advance copy of the book and wrote that the book “chronicles the successes, missteps and evolution of the agency tasked with protecting the American president.”

“Although Leonnig does depict some heroics by the Secret Service, her 487-page tome largely focuses on the challenges and stumbles — bureaucratic and otherwise — of the agency she describes as ‘spread dangerously thin’ through 11 presidents, starting with the assassination of John F. Kennedy and placing a particular emphasis on the George W. Bush, Obama and Trump eras.”

Former FBI agent Releases Third True-Crime Book in G-Men Series

“The G-Men and The Heiress: The 1934 Alice Speed Stoll FBI Kidnapping Case” by William E. Plunkett

By Steve Neavling

Former FBI Special Agent William E. Plunkett just released his third book in his G-Men series, which brings to life the true story of a tormented, good-looking gangster who kidnapped a beautiful socialite from Louisville. 

In “The G-Men and The Heiress: The 1934 Alice Speed Stoll FBI Kidnapping Case,” Thomas Robinson Jr. masterminds the kidnapping of Alice Stoll and collects a $50,000 ransom, which he uses to fund a cross-country trip to Hollywood.

The story spans three decades and shows how Robinson dodged the death penalty and escaped from prison twice. 

Plunkett’s other books in the G-Men series are “A True FBI Crime Story of the 1930s” and “A 1929 FBI Washington Cold Case.”

Plunkett joined the FBI in 1982 and worked in Albany, Syracuse, Cincinnati, and Washington D.C. He was an original member of the Cincinnati FBI Joint Terrorism Working Group and the bureau’s Joint Terrorism Task Force, which was created in the aftermath of 9/11.