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Tag: Al Sharpton

Rev. Sharpton: FBI Director Was Wrong to Suggest Public Stop Recording Police

camera policeBy Rev. Al Sharpton
for Huffington Post

Last week a federal grand jury indicted officer Michael Slager, who shot and killed Walter Scott in South Carolina, on several charges including violating civil rights laws. During that same week, FBI director James Comey came out with more shocking statements claiming videos are somehow stifling police officers from doing their job and may lead to homicide rates and crime increasing. If Walter Scott’s tragic death were not caught on videotape, officer Slager likely would have never been charged and his family may have never known the truth. Reducing crime and keeping communities safe is what we all want, but if we are to ever separate good cops from the bad ones and reform policing in this country, we must push for more videotaped evidence and transparency (as a start), and not blame videos. New technology should be embraced instead of scapegoated.

While homicide rates have increased in certain places, in cities like New York and many others, they have gone down. There is no conclusive evidence as to what is either causing or decreasing these rates, and definitely no evidence of a so-called ‘Ferguson effect’. For the director of the FBI to even insinuate that such a thing exists is irresponsible, dangerous and unacceptable. Secondly, videotaping police misconduct is adding to the enforcement of law, not taking away from it because police misconduct is in fact a crime. How can anyone say that citizens should not videotape crime and it be used against alleged criminals? When security and surveillance cameras are everywhere in order to catch the bad guys, we should utilize cell phone videos to do the same – even if those bad guys happen to be wearing a police uniform.

To read more click here. 

Rev. Sharpton Admits He Helped FBI: ‘I’m a Cat. I Chase Rats’

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The Rev. Al Sharpton lashed out at critics who are calling him a rat for helping the FBI go after Mafia figures in the 1980s.

At a news conference in Harlem, Sharpton said he “did what was right” when he helped an FBI task force – the “Genovese Squad” – pursue violent mafia members, the New York Daily News reports.

“I was not and am not a rat because I wasn’t with the rats,” he said. “I’m a cat. I chase rats.”

Sharpton said he approached the feds only because his life was threatened by mobsters and had no idea feds were referring to him as an informant.

I don’t know none of that,” Sharpton said. “I know I was threatened. I did what anybody would do…other than a thug. And I cooperated.”

Rev. Al Sharpton Worked As FBI Informant After Getting Caught Talking to Kingpin About Cocaine

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The Rev. Al Sharpton, a civil rights activist and former presidential candidate, began working as a confidential FBI informant in the 1980s after he was caught on tape discussing cocaine deals with a drug kingpin, the New York Post reports.

Sharpton cooperated with authorities and helped the feds bring down the notorious Genovese crime family, according to hundreds of pages of court filings and FBI memos.
Sharpton, who denied in an interview that he was an informant, acknowledged he helped the FBI beginning in 1983.
Records indicate Sharpton used a customized Hartmann briefcase outfield with a recorder, which he used during 10 face-to-face meetings with Joseph (Joe Bana) Buonanno, a Gambino family member.

Sharpton, who was referred to as CI-7 in the reports, also was paid for his help, according to the records.

The information led to wiretaps to bug two Genovese family social clubs, three cars used by mobsters and many of their phones.
Sharpton responded with surprise when reached by the New York Post.

“I was never told I was an informant or I had a number or none of that,” he said. “Whether or not they used some of the other information they got during that period for other purposes, I don’t know.”